Model 3

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Ceramic coating for model 3 , worth it?

I live in Chicago, do you think ceramic coating and ppf required for model 3?
Any suggestions where we can get it done for lesser price? I am ready to travel to near by place for cheaper price with decent quality.

Comments

  • only you can answer that. I also live part time in Chicago and have no coating. 2018 delivery.
  • I haven't yet received my car, its due for delivery.

    So does the salt or small stones damage the paint? I have heard some of the YouTubers mentioning them.
  • I have no damage at all on my paint. No coating or wraps and use car washes all the time.
  • actually I do have one chip on the hood.
  • Gotcha thanks!
  • I have ceramic coating on all our cars now. For me it’s about ease of wash not the scratch/chip prevention. 7-8 months a year at below freezing temps I can easily wash 3 of my cars in my garage in under 30 min. The dirt just falls off.

    I have ceramic pro gold on our model 3 and my truck. The truck was done almost 4 years ago and was ~$2200. We got the Tesla done ~2.5 years ago, actually had the car delivered to the detail shop and had the ceramic done before we brought it home. The new Tesla was ~$1800 since it didn’t need paint correction/prep.

    Since then I’ve done CQuartz on my self our MB and Subaru. So far the CQuartz is close to the ceramic pro. That said it took 5 days of daily work, the car inside the garage and not driven to prep then apply the coating.

    With a new car I would not hesitate to do ceramic pro again.
  • I'd say no. Got it and it was worn off in 9 months. Top shop and product. They even offered to redo it for free. I take the car to car wash once a week in winter ski season, the do it yourself rinse and soft brush. They said they'd redo it and wash the car once a week by hand if I'd stop going to the car washes. Apparently the ceramic is meant to be babied.

    Having detailer buff the ceramic off and just a good wax twice a year.

    Get full nose PPF. Get rocker cover PPF and mudguards. That's it.
  • I also live in the Chi area and I did a DIY ceramic coating (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s23Dq7I6KLw&t=302s)
    I would not pay for a service doing it but DIY I think it is well worth it, it is just so much easier to wash away road salt/slush
  • I ceramic coated mine myself. It's not hard to apply. Best time is when it's new. You know there's no other coating on it and swirl marks should be minimal. I'd recommend claying the car first.
  • I'd do it if it was less expensive, but it's not worth it to me. It's just a car. It looks great after you wash it (like all cars) and then it gets dirty again (like all cars).
  • > @BHowe said:
    > I ceramic coated mine myself. It's not hard to apply. Best time is when it's new. You know there's no other coating on it and swirl marks should be minimal. I'd recommend claying the car first.
    -You don’t clay a car unless you plan on polishing it. Clay is an abrasive and adds marring and scratches.
  • Living in the Low Country of SC/Ga it’s well worth it. The amount of Live Oak pollen in the spring is really beyond imagination. I washed my car yesterday and went golfing. When I was finished the car wasn’t blue any longer it was a dull green. On the base of the windows it was probably 1/2 MM thick.

    Got home and put the hose on “spray” and the cart was clean in about 5 minutes. Last year it would have required a 20 minute or longer full wash. The ceramic covering means no sticking to the surface at all. Even better the bird droppings clean off just the same.

    One issue, and I’ve posted this elsewhere. The cost at a reputable detail shop is about $450 to $600 plus preparation time of about $60/hour. My detail shop needed 11 hours to prep the surface due to the lousy fit and finish instead of the usual 1-2 hours for most cars. Fortunately he took detailed photos so I knew he was being truthful.

    The result, however, was very well worth the cost. I knew what to expect when I bought the car so no surprises. I paid a lot of money to have a great driving, live action electronic toy. Never entered my mind that I was buying a luxury car. Since buying just before Xmas, I’ve since gotten 2 others to buy. I love my “Blu Goos”.
  • > @Scgo4 said:
    > Living in the Low Country of SC/Ga it’s well worth it. The amount of Live Oak pollen in the spring is really beyond imagination. I washed my car yesterday and went golfing. When I was finished the car wasn’t blue any longer it was a dull green. On the base of the windows it was probably 1/2 MM thick.
    >
    > Got home and put the hose on “spray” and the cart was clean in about 5 minutes. Last year it would have required a 20 minute or longer full wash. The ceramic covering means no sticking to the surface at all. Even better the bird droppings clean off just the same.
    >
    > One issue, and I’ve posted this elsewhere. The cost at a reputable detail shop is about $450 to $600 plus preparation time of about $60/hour. My detail shop needed 11 hours to prep the surface due to the lousy fit and finish instead of the usual 1-2 hours for most cars. Fortunately he took detailed photos so I knew he was being truthful.
    >
    > The result, however, was very well worth the cost. I knew what to expect when I bought the car so no surprises. I paid a lot of money to have a great driving, live action electronic toy. Never entered my mind that I was buying a luxury car. Since buying just before Xmas, I’ve since gotten 2 others to buy. I love my “Blu Goos”.

    11 hours of paint prep on a new car is ludicrous. It would have taken less time to strip it down and re-paint it. When I put ceramic on our old 2004 Mercedes it took me (not a pro retailer) about 4-5 hours of prep: iron remover, clay bar, buffing compound, and even chip painting.

    Like you said On a new car from a professional detailer 1-2 hrs prep max.
  • Doesn't make sense to me spending $2k on ceramic coat. It doesn't protect the paint against rock chips, and as RUSirius noted, it has to be babied to maintain its effectiveness. Have to hand wash, follow maintenance rules, use certain car wash products, have it inspected yearly, recharge if needed, etc.

    If I spent the same amount of time and money to maintain the paint on my car without ceramic, it would stay smooth and shiny too, without the $2k upfront cost.
  • @ Mgoblue19 are they allowing Teslas in Michigan now? /s
  • > @RayNLA said:
    > > @BHowe said:
    > > I ceramic coated mine myself. It's not hard to apply. Best time is when it's new. You know there's no other coating on it and swirl marks should be minimal. I'd recommend claying the car first.
    > -You don’t clay a car unless you plan on polishing it. Clay is an abrasive and adds marring and scratches.
    >

    You would be surprised how much paint residue and other dust is on your car. Take a plastic sandwhich bag and put your hand in it. Then lightly rub the paint surface. Youll be surprised. I preferred getting all those bumps off my paint before ceramic coating, but you do it the way you want. BTW, it wont scratch if you apply liberal lubricant and dont over pressure the clay.
  • I clayed my car when I received it...as BHowe states, just make sure you use plenty of lubricant, go easy on how hard you push, fold often and replace with new clay every panel! I took off a lot of impurities and my car came up spotless!
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