Model Y

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PSI during warm days

For the past couple of days the weather has been warmer than expected, and this has raised the PSI on the tires from 42 (recommended setting) to 48/49 as I drive the car. Should I be concerned about tires exploding, or anything else, with this high PSI? Is it recommended to let some air out on warmer days to compensate? Thank you in advance.

Comments

  • I find it VERY hard to believe that weather would make such a difference. Can you tell us exactly when and how you are checking PSI? I am assuming you are using the onboard TPMS display. Please confirm. And, are you checking that pressure in early AM as you drive the car for the first time, or after driving many miles (which warms up tires and increases pressure). and how many miles at what speed? And, how much has the weather temp changed for you?
  • This is exactly what I was surprised to see. I recently took my car in for heater servicing and Tesla themselves topped up the PSI to 42. However, the weather started warming up (from -20 celsius to -2 celsius and now around +4 celsius). When I hop in the car in the morning the PSI from the onboard display shows 44, and then when I drive it on the highway for 20-25 minutes, it shows 48 and even reached 49 yesterday. Today it was hovering around 48 on all tires.

    So should I reduce the pressure manually and then reinflate when the weather goes cold again??
  • For reference it is 2 psi for every 10 degrees.

    So if you set your tires to 40 psi when it is 30 deg and then we get a warm day where it goes up to 55 deg you can easy see your pressure rise to 45 psi.

    I typically let it ride as I can't be changing my pressure the way our weather has been.
  • For every 10f degree temp change, PSI will go up/down about 2psi.

    Our temps in Fort Worth, TX went from single digits to 80f in just 4 days. I allowed the PSI to drop to 35, and it's now hovering around 44-45. I'll adjust it back down (I prefer 39-40 with my ContiProContact 19")


    Highway PSI might go up, but IMO, not as much as you're seeing. Which tires are on your car?
  • > @pianewman said:
    > For every 10f degree temp change, PSI will go up/down about 2psi.
    >
    > Our temps in Fort Worth, TX went from single digits to 80f in just 4 days. I allowed the PSI to drop to 35, and it's now hovering around 44-45. I'll adjust it back down (I prefer 39-40 with my ContiProContact 19")
    >
    >
    > Highway PSI might go up, but IMO, not as much as you're seeing. Which tires are on your car?

    I've got the 20" induction winter wheels from from Tesla.

    So it sounds like my PSI is too high and I should let some air out then.
  • Which TIRES do you have? Also, check the very fine print on the sidewall of your tire, close to the rim. You'll need proper light to read the info. It will tell you the maximum PSI that your tire is designed to run on.
  • Tire pressure is always checked cold without having driven to heat them up. So, whatever increase in psi happens during driving doesn't matter and is not concerning.

    I've set my tires to maximum psi on the sidewall for over 13 years and over 250,000 miles. It maximizes mileage, handling, tire wear, but a little rougher ride. Only Oldsmobile Brougham drivers care about a soft ride.
  • leatcrows - thanks for the details. Everyone else - thanks for educating me about the influence of weather. Guess i have been living too long in moderate weather Bay Area, CA. Grew up in snow country, but left it 43 years ago! So, i agree leatcrows - time to let the air out in the morning to get the pressure down to 42.
  • 42 is too high anyways.....it's a rough ride. until the air suspension option comes out the MY is considered by most to be best at 38-40 PSI cold
  • > @mislead said:
    > 42 is too high anyways.....it's a rough ride. until the air suspension option comes out the MY is considered by most to be best at 38-40 PSI cold

    Agreed. It's amazing the difference between 40psi and 42psi.
  • To answer OP's original question about tires exploding, there's no need to worry. I decided to overinflate one to make sure I could get home safely with a screw stuck in it, and was surprised to find the max allowable pressure was 150PSI!! That limit may vary by tire model but I wouldn't worry about a few PSI extra.
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