Model 3

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NEW 2021 MODEL 3 SR+, BATTERY DROPPING FAST

Hi there, I have just picked a Giga Shanghai 2021 model 3 sr+ in Australia, on the first day I drove 35km, the battery drop from 100% to 75%, the second day I drove 55km, battery dropped from 100% to 68%. I did not drive wildly, but with auto A/C all the time. I am not comfortable with this real world rang, so I went back to the store, had the battery checked with no issues. I was told that the new car needs few weeks to learn about the driving habit and charging habit, then it will get the normal range. And also I should not charge the car to 100% every day, but only charge when it falls to 50%-90%。

Is this the case? Thanks in advance.
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Comments

  • Before you jump to any conclusions or freak out too much I would charge it to 100% and drive normally until you get the battery down to approximately 5%. Then, see how many km you're able to go. The first bit of driving always takes the most amount of range because regenerative braking doesn't work until you deplete the battery a little bit.
  • This topic gets posted several times per week. Just go back and read any one of the numerous threads.

    Go to the energy graph on the car’s display. If you match the rated efficiency then you should get very close to the rated range. Your driving speed and style is the biggest factor in actual range. Additionally, when on a trip, the navigation will tell you where to stop and charge. If you are coming up short, the car will tell you to slow down and provide you with a recommended speed to arrive at your destination.

    As far as charging, this is covered in the owner’s manual. Charge to no more than 90% unless you need max range for a long trip. Leave the car plugged in whenever possible.


    https://www.tesla.com/support/range
  • Those numbers does not seems right...
  • Cars made in China uses LFP batteries which is known to lower efficiency but cheaper so expected and also Tesla range is way overrated.
  • I get the concern about having a bad battery but a lot of new owners suddenly obsess over numbers. Does the car do all of the daily driving you need on a single charge? Can you recharge it to 90% by morning? If yes to both, what is the range problem?
  • edited March 11
    > @JoyBoy said: I was told that the new car needs few weeks to learn about the driving habit and charging habit, then it will get the normal range. And also I should not charge the car to 100% every day, but only charge when it falls to 50%-90%"

    The car needing to "learn habits" is totally bogus as Tesla shows the range based on RATED range (the EPA, EURO 5 etc.).

    Tesla does show real world range via the Projected Range in the Energy/Consumption graphic and that does take your last 30 miles of driving and gives you the Projected Range which is typically 10-30% less than Rated Range. Rated Range is shown on the graphic so you can see how far off Rated Range is from Projected (actual) Range.

    On charging everyday at L2, it won't hurt anything. Tesla used to recommend leaving it plugged in 24/7.

    You should only charge between 10% and 85% per basic Lithium ion battery tech.

    https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

    Basics on EV range.

    1. Take off 10% for real world conditions, mostly driving faster than 100km
    2. Take off 25% for 10-85% daily charging.
    3. Take off 10-20% for winter driving as battery begins to lose range at 50F.

    If you get TeslaFI.com it can show you each drive and how energy is getting used so you can look at how and where you drive to use range extending driving techniques, shades of Prius hypermiling.

    https://imgur.com/1uh5hTT
  • > @RUSirius said:
    > ...
    > Tesla used to recommend leaving it plugged in 24/7.

    Did Tesla change that recommendation? When / where?

    > You should only charge between 10% and 85% per basic Lithium ion battery tech.

    A lot of people say that, but remember that those papers are talking about single cells without the benefit of an advanced BMS system. 10% as reported by a Tesla's screen is _not_ the same as what would be considered 10% when measuring the voltage of a cell directly so you can't apply the same rules in exactly the same way to cars. This is particularly true on the low end, where what is reported as 1% by the car would necessarily have to be far, far higher than 1% at the cell level.

    The short version: you probably don't have to worry about the battery when driving your car at low SOC levels. The only thing you should worry about at low SOC is running out of charge and needing to be towed. If your car does get to a low SOC you of course want to charge it as soon as possible to keep it from dropping even lower due to vampire drain.
  • edited March 11
    > @"Carl Thompson" said: > A lot of people say that, but remember that those papers are talking about single cells without the benefit of an advanced BMS system."

    Not sure who is "a lot of people" but the tech on Lithium ion batteries is kind of old tech and basics have not changed. Lithium ion batteries have a definitive life span and the more full charge/discharges and the faster the charges, the faster the battery wears out.

    Tesla goes a bit closer to the max rating on batteries/range so the effects are bit more pronounced on Tesla's vs. Audis or Hyundais which tend to understate it.

    To this topic, the range "dropping fast" is more the owner getting "in service" on the limits on EV range.
  • @RUSirius so crazy. There used to be a guy around here who constantly linked to battery university, always promoted the energy graph, always said that "rated range" was on that graph (even though no ranges at all are), always promoted third party apps, and liked to show pictures of those apps, and lived in Oregon. The similarities to you are uncanny.
  • > @jallred said:
    > @RUSirius so crazy. There used to be a guy around here who constantly linked to battery university, always promoted the energy graph, always said that "rated range" was on that graph (even though no ranges at all are), always promoted third party apps, and liked to show pictures of those apps, and lived in Oregon. The similarities to you are uncanny.

    Sounds a little fishy
  • Next thing will be that RUSirius says he likes to ski, lives on a houseboat, likes to take jaunts to the coast during the summer and really really wants a CCS adapter.
  • > @RUSirius said:
    > ...
    > Not sure who is "a lot of people" but the tech on Lithium ion batteries is kind of old tech and basics have not changed. Lithium ion batteries have a definitive life span and the more full charge/discharges and the faster the charges, the faster the battery wears out.

    My point is that you are mistakenly assuming that 10% as reported by the car's screen is the same as 10% at the lithium ion cell level and applying rules of thumb meant for individual cells to the car as a whole.

    And as far charge cycles go restricting the charge range in which you are willing to use a battery does not at all change the total number of complete cycles used if you are doing the same amount of work. Depleting a lithium ion cell from 100% to 0% is the exact same number of cycles as depleting a cell from 75% to 25% twice.

    There is some small benefit to restricting the charge range in which you use the battery but it has nothing to do with lowering the cycle count because it _doesn't_ lower the cycle count. But for Teslas the benefit of restricting the used charge range appears so small it's not worth the inconvenience as long as you try to keep things under 90%.
  • > @"Carl Thompson" said: > My point is that you are mistakenly assuming that 10% as reported by the car's screen is the same as 10% at the lithium ion cell level and applying rules of thumb meant for individual cells to the car as a whole."

    Well yes but I don't know of any other percentage of charge indicator we can other than the Tesla itself.

    What other indicator of per cent of range are you suggesting to use? Miles can't be used as one day 100 miles is 30% of battery, the next day 50%.

    Only thing we have is the car's report on per cent of charge. It seems to be fairly accurate.
  • > @RUSirius said:
    >
    > Not sure who is "a lot of people"
    >
    Odd you don't understand this? This is a trolling technique you have used for years...countless posts of yours mention "many people have said..." and "so many cases of..." and "a large amount of owners complained..."

    Eat it Fish!
  • I have been tracking my M3 SR+ energy consumption for the last three months using the https://www.fleetcarma.com/ ODBII device. It measures energy consumption, efficiency, trip miles, ambient temperature, average speed, and more for every trip.
    Bottom line, driving in an average temperature of 32oF (0 Celsius), with heater on 72oF (22C) and seat heater on medium, normal driving (about 5mph over speed limit), the efficiency is about 300Wh/mi.
    So the total range of the M3 SR+ would be about 160miles (260Km).
    Practically speaking since no one wants to drive down to 0%, the range would be about 140mi (230km).
    I don't have hard data on my summer driving, but in the summer with no AC running, normal driving (no hard acceleration or breaking), 200Wh/mi (or 250mi range) is possible.
    I have the spreadsheet if any one is interested.
  • > @OMB said: > Bottom line, driving in an average temperature of 32oF (0 Celsius), with heater on 72oF (22C) and seat heater on medium, normal driving (about 5mph over speed limit), the efficiency is about 300Wh/mi. So the total range of the M3 SR+ would be about 160miles (260Km). Practically speaking since no one wants to drive down to 0%, the range would be about 140mi (230km)."

    That sounds right and the proportion for deration would apply to all the models with different ranges.
  • Public Service Announcement:
    RUSirius is a known troll of several years standing and several user names who pushes an anti Tesla narrative. Please take his opinions with a grain of salt, avoid any advice he may suggest, and do not let him implant any Fear, Uncertainty, or Doubt about Tesla or your car into your own opinion.
  • > @RUSirius said:
    > > @OMB said: > Bottom line, driving in an average temperature of 32oF (0 Celsius), with heater on 72oF (22C) and seat heater on medium, normal driving (about 5mph over speed limit), the efficiency is about 300Wh/mi. So the total range of the M3 SR+ would be about 160miles (260Km). Practically speaking since no one wants to drive down to 0%, the range would be about 140mi (230km)."
    >
    > That sounds right and the proportion for deration would apply to all the models with different ranges.
    >

    Deration??? This tool is just inventing words now!
  • We actually taught him that deration is a malapropism, but he’s uneducable about science and English. Everything, really.
  • > @RUSirius said:
    > > @OMB said: > Bottom line, driving in an average temperature of 32oF (0 Celsius), with heater on 72oF (22C) and seat heater on medium, normal driving (about 5mph over speed limit), the efficiency is about 300Wh/mi. So the total range of the M3 SR+ would be about 160miles (260Km). Practically speaking since no one wants to drive down to 0%, the range would be about 140mi (230km)."
    >
    > That sounds right and the proportion for deration would apply to all the models with different ranges.
    >
    Misuse of “deration” again - confirmation that RUSirius is FISHEV, our resident doctor/solar panel installer.
  • I think I’ve said this in many other threads. I almost always beat the rated range. I make frequent 130-mile round trips on the interstate here (I-95) and I beat the rated range numbers on all but the coldest winter days. During the summer I get in the range of 170 - 180 Wh/mile. During the coldest winter days it’s about 30% less if I don’t do my final charging just before I leave to ensure the battery is warmed up. During the summer I have a 200-mile round trip to the beach I make maybe 6 or 7 times a season on which I beat rated range by quite a bit - my 2019 SR+ gets 270 miles or better.
  • > @AmokTime said:
    > I think I’ve said this in many other threads. I almost always beat the rated range. I make frequent 130-mile round trips on the interstate here (I-95) and I beat the rated range numbers on all but the coldest winter days. During the summer I get in the range of 170 - 180 Wh/mile. During the coldest winter days it’s about 30% less if I don’t do my final charging just before I leave to ensure the battery is warmed up. During the summer I have a 200-mile round trip to the beach I make maybe 6 or 7 times a season on which I beat rated range by quite a bit - my 2019 SR+ gets 270 miles or better.

    Complete lie achieving 170-180 Wh/mile. Post picture to prove.
  • “Complete lie achieving 170-180 Wh/mile. Post picture to prove.”

    LOL. How about 110 wh/mi? Here’s the proof.

    https://electrek.co/2018/05/27/tesla-model-3-range-new-hypermiling-record/
  • My 10 mile drive to town is 125 Wh/m because of the 400 foot drop.
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