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Navigation query

Just got my new M3 standard range.

I’m playing with navigation and route planning. My question how come when I navigate a route that is 196miles and I have a battery level of 245 does it say I will arrive with -4% battery. I understand the routing is accurate to terrain etc but that’s shedding 50miles? Just seems odd?

Comments

  • Probably because they know that nobody realistically gets the range their battery range claims it can get. If you open the Energy tab, it should tell you your estimated range, and that should be a more realistic representation of your range.
  • Real routes are rarely as efficient as EPA testing. Speed, terrain, and weather, headwinds in particular, can markedly reduce achievable range. Slowing down is always an option to extend your range.
  • Shame if the range is constantly over optimistic. My old Hybrid BMW 530e would tend to be conservative so when I got into a steady motorway cruise the range would creep up not down. Shame if Tesla tends to do it the other way!
  • Forgot to say. Thanks all.
  • > @Tim_Jones2021 said:
    > Just got my new M3 standard range.
    >
    > I’m playing with navigation and route planning. My question how come when I navigate a route that is 196miles and I have a battery level of 245 does it say I will arrive with -4% battery. I understand the routing is accurate to terrain etc but that’s shedding 50miles? Just seems odd?

    Changes in elevation, temperature, headwinds, etc. can affect range. The biggest factor is speed. If the speed limit is 70 mph or greater, then you will not achieve rated range unless you are going downhill or have a nice tailwind. The nav takes into account elevation changes and speed along the route. The rated range is determined by the EPA (in the US) and is a mix of highway and city driving.
  • Hybrids can not be compared to EVs. They carry a massive energy reserve. EVs carry the equivalent of 2-3 gallons of gas, so anything that robs you of energy has an outsized effect be it an electric heater or overcoming drag at high speed. Read it. It’s been written about hundreds of times here.
  • Read up.
  • @Tim_Jones2021 - I've learned a lot about range reduction from @Bighorn, who I think has the most experience of anyone on the subject. Besides the electric heater (turn it off and use the seat heater if you need to) I recently learned that a cold rain may be even worse than an even colder dry drive. The water effectively holds the car back through increased drag, as well as carrying more heat energy away through conduction vs. radiation. I'm not really sure which effect is greater, although Bighorn thinks it is the drag (and he has more experience). Also, from multiple sources, if you just slow down a little on a highway (I think the EPA highway estimate is at 65 mph) you will find much greater range when you need it.
  • @RAR
    I’d say it’s both the drag of the rain in the air, and the increased rolling resistance. Slush is killer.
  • I can speak to slush being a killer. Just after I’d got comfortable with wind and rain, it reared its ugly head on the way to Custer.
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