Model S

40 kWh battery will not be produced. It's official

2

Comments

  • edited November -1
    Makes me wonder... Would the 60kW battery be a software downgrade of the 85kW? Nah... April fool's again! :)
  • edited November -1
    WOW, this makes the 40KW model a true bargain. that battery will never get near the full charge and should last very long with its intended range.
  • edited November -1
    @dortor

    I think what Logical is getting at is that you could set your software-limited 60kwh Model S to charge at Max Range rather than Standard on a regular basis and not worry that you're degrading the battery. It is indeed a good deal for those who are getting it.

    According to the article I just read it's only retroactive though, no future 40kwh orders will be taken. (Though the article could certainly be wrong)

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2013/04/01/tesla-motors-model-s-profitable/2041457/
  • edited November -1
    @noel.Smyth, yes, except it is not really of any practical significance for the average user, who will only regularly be using a small fraction of their car's battery capacity anyway.

    However, for 40 kwh purchasers who would have been regularly maxing out their car's battery pack, this is indeed good news.
  • edited November -1
    I hope USA Today is wrong re: no more 40 kwh orders. Well it appears that right NOW you can still reserve a 40kwh on this website... So if you are in the fence, click away and order right now because Tesla will have to honor your reservation.....
  • edited November -1
    This is awesome! Most certainly not an April Fools joke.
  • edited November -1
    Tesla stock jumped $6.64 or more than 17%, to $44.53 on the news early Monday.

    But customers who want to try to jump on the bandwagon to own one of the chic electric cars on the cheap may be in for a disappointment.

    The electric car maker has announced that it's not going to offer its cheapest version of the Model S sedan, the starter model
  • edited November -1
    Just spoke to Tesla.

    Cost to upgraded from
    * 40kw to 60kw down the road will be $11k
    * Cost to upgrade to supercharger down the road will be $2.5k, however you need to have a 60kw to upgrade.

    Total cost of upgrading from 40kw to 60kw with supercharing will be $13.5k vs $12k if you order out right
  • edited November -1
    Any official statement that the 40kwh is called to the few orders that have already been placed? Link?
  • edited November -1
    *capped ( not called)
  • edited November -1
    Whoa, that cost to upgrade is steep. Especially considering the battery replacement option cost.
  • edited November -1
    I'd counter it's not really too steep, considering that the battery pre purchase option is heavily discounted ( likely based on a projection of continued lowering of battery costs per kwh over the next ten years.) The current price to replace the battery is much much higher than the pre-purchase option.

    Additionally, in ten years of the cost to replace the battery has significantly dropped, Tesla will almost certainly drop the upgrade cost to reflect the then- current market, because Tesla is not in the business to create waste (e.g. by encouraging unnecessary battery replacement).
  • edited November -1
    aagh. if, not of. ( Swype, I love and hate you...)
  • edited November -1
    @Logical_Thinker

    "yes, except it is not really of any practical significance for the average user, who will only regularly be using a small fraction of their car's battery capacity anyway."

    For the past three weekends, I've taken trips in my Model S that would not have been possible with a 40 kWh pack. One of the three trips would not have been possible with a 60 kWh pack (at least driving fast enough to keep up with the flow of traffic). Maybe I'm an atypical user, but at least for me the 85 kWh battery is the size needed to make my Model S work for most of my needs (but we'll still take my wife's Acura when we venture too far from the nearest supercharger).
  • edited November -1
    There may still be time for an existing reservation holder to configure a car for 40 kWh, but I suspect that a software-limited 60 kWh battery will not be offered in the future. Too many people would select that option if they knew they could always upgrade later, many more than the 4% who currently select the base model IMHO. By eliminating the 40 kWh car altogether (even the software-limited 60 kWh), TM may lose a few buyers at the bottom end, but will simplify production and marketing, and increase revenues overall.
  • edited November -1
    @Longhorn92 How about "40+"? I'm a glass half full kind of gal.
    Jokes aside, it makes sense to mark them 60 because they'll be carrying the 60 batt packs.
  • edited November -1
    Tesla just announced cost for upgrading from 40 kWh to 60 kWh. It's $11,000 to remove that limited software and $2,500 to activate SC. Total is $1,500 more if you do it in the future instead of now
  • edited November -1
    It would make little sense for Tesla to continue the 40 limited 60 since the battery probably costs them close to the 10k they are charing us.

    The reason for the limitation to 40 is to keep the existing 60 buyers from screaming and to have the possibility of more revenue from the update.
  • edited November -1
    The 60kWh to 85kWh upcharge is only $8k. The 60kWh battery has ~2000 cells less (5000 vs. 7000) so that is $4 per cell. They are probably making a healthy profit for each one, so my guess is they pay around $2 per cell.

    A hypothetical 40kWh battery with the same cells would have around 3300 cells, or 1700 less than the 60kWh battery. Thus the cost would be $3400 less. Since they were going to use one generation older cells, the cost differential would probably have been somewhat larger, on the order of $4-5000 would be my guess.

    So if 50% of the 40kWh owners upgrade in a few years, they will probably break even or profit slighly. This is not counting R&D saved from not designing and building the 40kWh pack.
  • edited November -1
    I have a 60kwh car. I'd really have no problem with TM just giving all 40 kwh buyers a 60kwh car without any limitations, provided this was limited to those that reserved on or before 3/31. We can understand this as part of the growing process. The whole software limitation thing is just annoying. Still, since TM has already announced this contrivance, I'd offer the 40kwh res. holders the option to get a full 60kwh car for $5K additional.
  • edited November -1
    @alfafoxtrot1

    There would be shitstorms. Just last week I changed my reservation from 40kwh to 60kwh for the full $10k.
  • edited November -1
    Just finalized a 40kw car today, so we'll see if they honor the order. If they won't I'll have a choice of getting my deposit back or upgrading to 60kw or 85kw.

    Should be interesting :-)
  • edited November -1
    @alfafoxtrot1: as a 40 kWh reservation holder, I really appreciate your selfless overture; however, that really would be unfair to the existing 60 kWh owners, especially those who upgraded from 40 kWh batteries recently (see @jeffaa's comment above). I think Tesla would need to reimburse all previous 40 kWh reservation holders who recently upgraded to 60 kWh cars, which probably doesn't make financial sense, especially if Tesla is taking a loss on the 40 kWh cars. Plus, all 60's would have a right to be upset.

    Tesla really seems to be going about this the right way (which I haven't said much recently).
  • edited November -1
    I think this sets up for a major Super Charger announcement tomorrow. Entire US roll out by EOY '13, all of North America and key Europe markets by mid '14. The fact that every Model S delivered will be SC capable, makes getting the roll out done sooner that much bigger! Removing the range anxiety and being able to get in the consumers ear now when gas price is a hot topic is huge, and IMO result in the current 20% pop in stock value as only the beginning.

    Go TESLA!
  • edited November -1
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