Model S

Miles per kwh?

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Comments

  • edited November -1
    13k on my 85 357kw/m on average :( what am I doing wrong? Mostly driving on 405 and pch. Charged at the recommended 90% I also noticed a drop of 7 miles in range... Anyone else experiencing this or is it just calculating from my average energy consumption?
  • edited November -1
    2013 P85 here...

    Lifetime average consumption = 294 Wh/mi
    Total mileage driven: 20,805 miles

    Miles per kWh = 3.4
  • edited November -1
    No offense but who really cares? I am 408 on average, but I drive the hell out of the car, my life not sitting in traffic if worth more than a marginal Wh/mi. My fear is the pansy Prius hyper mileage people drive these like golf carts, as they do the Prius. If you buy this car you have already done your part, do everyone a favor and not be the slow boat like every prius in the world. If you want to save on carbon, get a solar panel system. Slowing down traffic is putting a burden on everyone else and making them consume more fuel and thereby actually increasing carbon emissions. this is not a single person sport, if a big SUV has to brake for your slow arse, you just wasted for society more carbon than you saved.
  • edited November -1
    So far in a P85D the life average with only six weeks and dead of winter is about 360
    On nice days and driving nice I can get it down too the 320s
    Short commutes and using it all and driving it like a sports car gets me into the 550s for two mile or less trips.

    I also want to add that I have been floring it. driving the car with several hundred pounds of load and gear and passangers on road trips, I am work horsing the thing as it is a tool to be used for business and transportation.

    on the above comment before I was using a prius for the same job. and drove it too the max for all its 295 lbs of torque and 115 hp could give, drove it everywhere at 80 to 85mph and it finaly started giving out over 260,000 miles. Needing a battery replacement and burning a quart of oil every fill up. Average of 38 mpg and I drove it to death.
    That car however saved a lot of gas because before that I was driving a 78 corvette with a rebuilt engine built to late sixties specs and that was fun. but the 12mpg and need for repair all the time got annoying. And having a kid put a crimp on the whole sports car two seat life but it was what I could afford when I was in high school and put over 100k miles on the second engin, now on the third.

    Thank goodness for Tesla, I get the best of all worlds. A big family car that can carry a lot, safe, no gas. and preformes better than the old corvette with all the comforts too.
  • edited November -1
    ~3.1 kWh/mi. Varies with weather.

    Stats on this thread:

    Relevant answer: 10
    Inverse of relevant: 10 (did you guys actually comprehend the question?)
    Me too!: 1
    Irrelevant answers: 5
    Explanations of basic math (may have an answer included somewhere): 2
  • edited November -1
    @ brian | February 18, 2015

    <i>No offense but who really cares?

    Lots of MS owners care about Wh/mi <b>whether you like it or not</b>.

    <i>My fear is the pansy Prius hyper mileage people drive these like golf carts, as they do the Prius.

    Really? You <b>fear</b> Prius owners trying to get good mileage!

    I've driven a Prius for several years, getting over 40 mpg for real, with good weather and bad as well as hills and stop lights. On the road, always over the posted speed limit, I've gotten between 45 mpg and 50 mpg, depending on the circumstances. Hell, I've had stretches at about 75 mph getting about 45 mpg. <b>When</b> my Prius waits at a stop light beside another car, 90% of the time I accelerate ahead of the other car.

    I'd be sympathetic with your <b>fear</b> if I believed you. Since I don't believe your post is honest, I'm inclined to think of it as an intentional insult. Would you please help me understand your good intention, if any?
  • edited November -1
    After 10 months and 30k miles...

    330 in summer with summer tires and a lead foot.
    390ish in the winter with Michelin X-ICE3 tires, a lead foot, and a lot of driving around 0 degrees F....

    Trip to work is 140 miles round trip and 1300 feet of elevation change plus 2-3 Bridges in NYC depending on route taken. Around town driving can be a 1200 foot elevation change in 5 miles.

    I reset trip B for the season. Trip A average is around 340 for life of car. I almost never put the car in range mode...

    S85. Mobileye 560 and K40 added aftermarket

    Cheers
    A
  • edited November -1
    @ brian,

    <i>My fear is the pansy Prius hyper mileage people drive these like golf carts, as they do the Prius. If you buy this car you have already done your part, do everyone a favor and not be the slow boat like every prius in the world. If you want to save on carbon, get a solar panel system.</i>

    I'm one of those people. Hi there! Very pleased to meet you. Efficiency is important to me. My lifetime efficiency is at 294 Wh/mi. I care about the pollution that goes into the air. Doing my part doesn't end with buying the car. It never ends. I'm doing my part 24/7/365. Oh yah, and I also have a 14k solar array on my roof. Yep, doing my part... all without being a douche-bag on the road.

    <i>Slowing down traffic is putting a burden on everyone else and making them consume more fuel and thereby actually increasing carbon emissions.</i>

    Actually not true. The most efficient speed for Model S is under 40 MPH. The efficiency of most ICE vehicles is also inversely proportional to speed due to the effect of drag and rolling resistance. So if you were to slow down from 80 MPH to 65 MPH because you are stuck behind a Prius, wipe your tears away with the fact that you are driving more efficiently and those behind you are also increasing their MPG efficiency.

    You seem to think that flooring it and getting to your destination is a more efficient way of driving. What you save in clock ticks you more than lose in efficiency. Your relatively high average 408 Wh/mi consumption speaks to that and undermines the argument you are trying to make at the very end.

    If you ever drive behind me, I certainly hope you have TACC on your car.
  • edited November -1
    @Grinnin'.us.VA and @AmpedRealtor


    My point is simple - driving a car (prius) the most efficient way is not efficient for everyone else and in doing so it actually hurts society and carbon emission more that what was saved.

    We come from different parts of the US, my electricity is produced from either my solar arrays (not so good in the winter) of via hydro/wind, given I live in the NW US and I pay the uplift for green energy with PGE for electricity. I get it, if your electric is produced from dirtier methods you should be more sensitive to your energy usage and therefore your carbon, but I would argue that the vast majority of the "Prius" owners that drive in this manner create traffic jams, because 65 is not ideal that they are the problem on the highway, and actually contribute more to carbon emissions by forcing ICE vehicles to brake and slow up traffic, therefore inducing more traffic jams.
    I can't speak for every place, but in the Portland area, the Prius drivers are the problem with traffic slowing. In the past 10 years, not accounting for growth traffic has slowed considerably. To be honest some of that has to be attributed to texting, but no one can ignore the Prius driver, they are a sincere problem.


    The bottom line is this, if you seek, for yourself, the most efficient energy usage, you are extracting some of that from others on the road. Be a good citizen, and not be the slow person, and be happy that you are better than everyone else.
  • edited November -1
    Model 3 will really shine for Wh/mile. As a comparison the Volt easily gets 4+ miles/kWh.

    I wouldn't be surprised if Tesla Model 3 gets 4.5 mi/kWh on average, relatively spirited driving. It'll be more slippery than a Volt and weigh similar (Volt weighs 3786 lbs).
    That would mean an 85 kWh pack could deliver around 370 miles range and would probably be EPA rated at 5.2 miles/kWh giving an EPA range of around 420 miles.
  • edited November -1
    I've read this entire thread before replying...
    @ brian: the problem with slow traffic and excess consumption of fuel lies in your mirror...or your foolish,boorish driving behavior. You're a danger to your life and mine and any other driver/passenger on the road. Everyone slowing down 5-7 mph will make traffic flow better, resulting in less congestion, less fuel consumption, less death from accidents, lower insurance rate.. ad infinitum. To be sure, distracted driving by others and your aggression is an explosive mix...
  • edited November -1
    @ brian | February 20, 2015

    <i>My point is simple - driving a car (prius) the most efficient way is not efficient for everyone else and in doing so it actually hurts society and carbon emission more that what was saved. ...

    From what you wrote, I'd guess that you think <b>your car</b> gets better mileage at 70 mph than it does at 65. If you believe this, please do a little research and provide an expert opinion that agrees with it.
  • edited November -1
    Another way to look at this is a multiplier: road miles x multiplier = rated miles shown on the dash. I've found a multiplier of 1.2 works pretty well for highway driving (75 mph) in moderate weather, using heat or a/c. This month in Indiana (-7 F) my multiplier has been consistently 1.5. That is, my 49-mile commute consumes 75 miles of rated range.
  • edited November -1
    Coming at this from another direction (RM/kWh) I have found one kWh will be used for each 2.88 RM charged in the S60. This seems very constant and I haven't seen much variance over the 2+ years I have driven my car - approximately 50,000 actual miles.

    The problem, of course, comes in converting this to actual miles. That entails all the calculations above regarding how and where you drive.

    Still, kWh are really based around range miles (RM) expended by your car. Then you need to factor in how your location charges for electricity, but at least one thing is constant in this process.
  • edited November -1
    @Craig
    You might check your math (typo?) as 2.88 rated miles per kWh works out to 347Wh/rated mile. That's not likely, especially in a 60 since my P85+ works out to about 275. 3.88 seems possible.
  • edited November -1
    @ brian,

    <i>My point is simple - driving a car <b>(prius)</b> the most efficient way is not efficient for everyone else and in doing so it actually hurts society and carbon emission more that what was saved.</i>

    There is no data to support such an outlandish assertion. I invite you to provide some.

    <i>I get it, if your electric is produced from dirtier methods you should be more sensitive to your energy usage and therefore your carbon</i>

    I just got done telling you that I have a 14 kW solar array on my roof. My energy is not dirty in any way, shape or form.

    <i>I would argue that the vast majority of the <b>"Prius"</b> owners that drive in this manner create traffic jams</i>

    You're not doing a very good job arguing because you are not presenting any facts outside of your opinion. Your opinion carries no particular credibility here. You know what they say about opinions and buttholes, right?

    <i>because 65 is not ideal that they are the problem on the highway, and actually contribute more to carbon emissions by forcing ICE vehicles to brake and slow up traffic, therefore inducing more traffic jams.</i>

    Stringing a few opinions together that depend upon the previous unsupported opinion being true does not make them facts. It makes for faulty logic. Silly rabbit.

    <i>I can't speak for every place, but in the Portland area, the <b>Prius</b> drivers are the problem with traffic slowing. In the past 10 years, not accounting for growth traffic has slowed considerably. To be honest some of that has to be attributed to texting, but no one can ignore the <b>Prius</b> driver, they are a sincere problem.</i>

    Well this explains everything! The problem is that you're in the Portland area. Just like Seattleites, Portlandians have no clue how to drive. That is a regional issue. Maybe you should move?

    <i>The bottom line is this, if you seek, for yourself, the most efficient energy usage, you are extracting some of that from others on the road.</i>

    Because you've lost your ability to pass a slower car? You keep repeating the same bogus argument expecting a different result. Do you understand the definition of insanity?

    <i>Be a good citizen, and not be the slow person, and be happy that you are better than everyone else.</i>

    Unless everyone on the road is traveling at exactly the same speed all of the time, someone will always be driving slower. I can assure you that from the standpoint of a Porsche driver, you're the pansy.

    And lastly, you really need to get over your obsession with the Prius. It's not healthy. I recommend having your cholesterol and blood pressure checked immediately.
  • edited May 2018
    I burn a lot of gas doing full throttle high speed passes on hyper milling Prius drivers in my old Nova. I love watching them twitch the steering wheel in my rear view mirror when the loud exhaust note jangles their nerves. Any way, driving the Tesla will is at flow of traffic. In this area that is 75 to 80 with the ac on cold because it is 110 degrees outside.
  • edited May 2018
    6400 miles

    286 kWH average
    Using AC
  • On my Tesla Roadster 2 (this car https://guidessimo.com/document/696135/tesla-roadster-2-automobile-116.html).
    Mileage: 4300 miles
    Flow rates: 2.23 miles / kWh
  • edited October 2019
    Tesla model 3 midrange. Mileage ~ 8700. 25.3kWh/100mi or equivalently 15.72kWh/100km.
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