Model S

Air Suspension failure with very unpleasant results

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Comments

  • edited July 2017
  • edited July 2017
    @Tldickerson Hey you misinterpreted my post...I was not suggesting you do these things. I was suggesting TESLA air suspension guy should incorporate this procedure to Solve their problem for you...and save some lemonade. :-)

    Looks to me like they are using trial and error...not an effective approach.
  • edited July 2017
    Here's what they did. Now I'll see if it worked.
    Corrections: Air Suspension - Air Line LF
    Verified air suspension was sagging on both right and left rear. Performed visual
    inspection on rear air line and found no leak. Due to repeat concern recommend replacing
    rear air lines and valve block.
    Part Quantity
    AIR SUSP VALVE BLOCK (1027919-00-B) 1
    AIR SUSP AIR LINE REAR BUNDLE ASY
    (1061812-00-A)
    1
    Parts Replaced or Added
    Corrections: Air Line - Air Suspension - Compressor to Valve Block
    Removed and replaced Valve block and verified proper operation.
    Corrections: Air Suspension - Primary Air Lines Assy
    Removed and replaced air lines and verified proper operation.
    Part Quantity
    AIR SPRING MODULE FR - MS2 DM
    (1067361-25-C)
  • edited July 2017
    Visual inspection? Hmm.
    I agree with jkilch...get a leak detector.
  • edited November -1
    What if it's already fixed?
  • edited July 2017
    @Tdickerson - I had the same issue on my P90D. The right, rear suspension would drop until the wheel well was touching the tire. It took 2-3 days of park time for it to fully sag to this level, but it was reliably reproducible.

    Tesla Service ended up replacing the rear air spring module, after noting the pressure leak tests were inconclusive.

    REAR AIR SPRING MODULE RH - DM
    (6006353-06-C)

    This fixed my issue.
  • edited November -1
    @lagomorph, thank you for your post. If my problem reappears I will tell them about your situation.
  • edited July 2017
    @Tldickerson,

    I attempted to make what I believed was an obvious joke. Guess I was wrong.

    @jkilch was attempting to let you know that the SC approach was what used to be known as the shotgun approach. That is not a professional troubleshooting and repair process. He also suggested a practical method to find and fix the true problem.

    I hope the problem is quickly found and fixed.
  • edited July 2017
    It appears that the new air lines fixed the leak problem.
  • edited July 2017
    Are you suggesting Tesla was able to fix the air suspension without needing to follow some ridiculous procedures posted on the internet by people who have probably never fixed an air suspension?
  • edited July 2017
    Funny isn't it that the service center was really able to do the job their hired to do. Just amazing tes-s
  • edited December 2018
    Sorry to resurrect a sleeping thread.

    Think I have noticed this before but when I got my 2013 home from annual service mid-November noticed the rear was lower than usual. Standard 19" tires, top of left rear is higher than the fender wheel opening. Measured to the ground the left rear is 3/4" to 1" lower than right rear. And right front is way higher. Viewed from the rear the rear tires have visible camber, top tilted in.

    Ran the suspension through all its heights and measured. LR barely rises from next-to highest to highest.

    Emailed the service center with pictures and have not heard a peep.

    Scheduled service. Next available was December 26. But I subscribed tot he Ranger Pickup service and want them to come get it. Guess I'm going to have to wait on hold on the phone for 20 minutes to talk to a human.

    Earlier this year a Ranger changed airbags in my driveway. Gave me his phone number. I texted a request that he stop by and look to tell me if I am insane or not as he lives about 15 miles away and the Service Center is 92 miles. That was Sunday so it has only been 24 hours.

    Doesn't seem to be a leak failure, I don't hear the pump unless I am changing ride height. Seems more of a right height sensor problem. Is this software tunable?
  • edited May 2019
    The air compressor on my 2013 P85+ broke down last week. 90.000 km+ and just over 5 years old.

    Shouldn't this be a warranty repair? It doesn't feel like a quality product if it brakes down this fast? Especially when you hear the service guys who take in your car talking about "ah, another one"....
  • edited May 2019
    @ArieP85+ How many years after the warranty expires do other automakers cover failures? I've always found it's zero, but perhaps you've found that rare automaker that covers failures years after the warranty expires, which would be nice.

    Things break down on every brand car over time. At least Tesla offers an extended warranty if you are concerned about items, although it sounds like you didn't buy that. Personally, I don't think extended warranties are worth it for any items, and save money by just paying for items out of warranty should they go bad.
  • edited May 2019
    Depends on the roads you drive during the life of the vehicle. I know an x owner that had this issue in Ithaca. The roads in Ithaca are insanely awful! The repair was only $250 American.
  • edited May 2019
    @Arie
    You mean six year old car? I’m guessing you didn’t buy it new.
  • Consumer Reports said that the 2017 Model S had air suspension problems. Ours was manufactured in December 2017. I have not read any reports on the 2017 other than Consumer Reports; if so I wonder if the fixed the problem by 12/2017?
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