Model 3

Is supercharging really free?

edited April 2017 in Model 3
The quote I got from Tesla PR is: "All Model 3 will have the capability for Supercharging. We haven't specified (and aren't right now) whether supercharging will be free."

Thanks to Mr Boylan at TMC

Update:
The point of this thread was to debunk the repeated claim that unlimited supercharging would be free on the Model 3. As we now know unequivocally, it is not.
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Comments

  • edited April 2016
    198,000 (and counting) are eagerly awaiting the answer.
  • edited April 2016
    Never was, never will be.
  • edited April 2016
    @JT
    There are some amateurs insisting Elon is giving away supercharger access--reason didn't work, so maybe this will quell the debate for awhile.
  • edited April 2016
    If by free you mean there is no added cost for it then yes, it was stated in the reveal (and on the site) that supercharging is included in all models.

    From a completely business point of view, no, it isn't free it's built into the price of the vehicle so you are paying for it, just not as an added line item.
  • edited April 2016
    Guess I need to rewatch the presentation. I took it as included with every model. He was clear about the autopilot being safety features and not the fun ones.
  • edited April 2016
    The debate will go on no doubt, BH, but thanks for the quote from home base. I am convinced it won't be free and unlimited. I hope for one of two versions:
    1. A substantial up-front cost to permanently enable (e.g. at least $3000) or
    2. Enable supercharging on a temporary basis by calling Fremont at, let's say, $200 per week if going on a trip - then disable again
  • edited April 2016
    It's really not that big a deal. Either model, season ticket or pay as you go, would work now. Tesla needed to force everyone to buy the season ticket to build up the network in the begining but that need is much smaller now. Future expansion could just follow people's actual needs and what they are willing to pay.
  • edited April 2016
    Included hardware does not imply either activated or free. Read the OP if you're convinced otherwise--straight from corporate.
  • edited April 2016
    I have no issue paying for SC enabling - but I would rather it be that route than pay-per-use. Given their history, I'd say they'll make it an option that you pay for once and done like they did with the 60. I think $3k is a bit steep, however. Wasn't it $2k with the S?
  • edited April 2016
    @mp
    It was $2000 configured or $2500 after the fact.
  • edited April 2016
    Thanks @bighorn, that's what I thought. I don't think it would be fair to gouge Model 3 buyers for $3k then - and I don't think Elon would do it considering his mission. I'd imagine $2k or maybe even $1.5K would be fair.
  • edited April 2016
    Saying it's supercharger-compatible by itself is meaningless. Why would Tesla ever release a car that is incompatible with its own charging network?? It's not a perk. It's a standard feature of all Teslas.. Consumers know this and interpret the statement as meaning free charging in the base $35K model 3.
  • edited April 2016
    @mos
    Neither the Roadster nor the S40 were supercharger capable/compatible.
  • edited April 2016
    Evolution of the mission?
  • edited April 2016
    I agree with mos6507. In fact I didn't even hear the word compatible in the reveal when he was talking about supercharging. He said all models "will come with supercharging" I take that to mean that they will have complete, free, access to the supercharging network.
  • edited April 2016
    I was listening pretty carefully, and here's the impression I was left with:

    Better performance -- optional
    Full autopilot features -- optional
    Supercharging -- included

    Now, I'm not saying my impression was right, but there are going to be 200,000 irritated people if they have to pay extra for an essential feature that Elon "said" was included.
  • edited April 2016
    Watch the video and read what was on the screen behind him. He was speaking extemporaneously and often says things that are misconstrued. The "capable" vernacular has a specific meaning for Tesla.
  • edited April 2016
    @Bighorn wrote: "Neither the Roadster nor the S40 were supercharger capable/compatible."

    The MS-40 I rented worked just fine at the Culver City Supercharger. So I think you could pay for an upgrade later. Charged super quick too.
  • edited April 2016
    I'd have to agree with BigHorn. Supercharging capability or supercharging included does not infer free supercharging. I read it as being unlocked for a price, much like the additional autopilot features.
  • edited April 2016
    @Uncoiled Being aggravated at Elon or Tesla is something that really does come free with your purchase. :-)
  • edited April 2016
    @Jeffey
    Supercharging a 40 was only possible because they installed 60kWH batteries. They did not offer the option to turn on supercharging unless the owner ponied up an extra $10k to convert it to a 60 first. Then you could pay the up charge to turn on the supercharger hardware. If you had a true 40 with supercharging, that's a real zebra. Have never heard of one before this.
  • edited April 2016
    On a slightly side note, If the 3 is supercharger capable but requires payment to use, how will they take payment for that? The current actual chargers have no mechanism for taking a payment, and it would seem a bit of an oversight to have to retro fit 3500 of them, so I am guessing that if not included it would be an annual or periodic charge, or maybe an in car payment? Any thoughts on that?

    I could see that sort of model working though, you get a basic car, then make a choice based on your anticipated mileage and trips if you want unlimited supercharging for £xxx a year, or pay as you go. Seems fair to me.
  • edited April 2016
    @ian
    We really don't know what capabilities have been built into the Superchargers. They seem to feed Tesla all kinds of info we don't have access to. The handshake before charging might pass all necessary info - we don't know otherwise. Implementing a per-charge fee would be trivial, if Tesla wanted to: Owners set up a charge account with Tesla, and they debit your card - either for each charge or at the end of every month.
  • edited April 2016
    @diegoPasedena - thanks, hadn't really thought about that handshake, but yes, of course, that would make perfect sense.
  • edited April 2016
    Agree the OP seems to infer actual charging may be extra. BTW - pay per use would be a simple software implementation. All the cars talk to the mother ship and it would be easy to count KwH used @ superchargers and charge accordingly. IMO, I think Tesla HAS to start charging at least a nominal fee for SCs at some point...
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