Model S

Cabin Overheat Protection feature

edited November -1 in Model S
Curious on how they came up with the 105 degree setting? Is that a temp that kids and pets can survive in for extended periods of time? Seems high. I tried to find data on this but came up short.

Thoughts?
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Comments

  • edited September 2016
    it does seem kind of high, but I think it's set that high because it's survivable and will not deplete the battery quickly
  • edited September 2016
    I'm just glad that children of absent minded parents don't have to die.
  • edited November -1
    Also curious if you can lower the setting (understanding the possible drain on the battery)?
  • edited November -1
    Seems way too high.
    Much rather use up some battery than make a pet or child suffer.
  • edited November -1
    This is a Survival feature... the adjustable Comfort version is coming in 8.1

    And by having a relatively high 105 deg set point, Tesla can make the claim that it can run for a year on one battery charge since most of the year will be WELL below 105 and the simple venting will reduce the temp sufficiently at a very cost to energy usage.
  • edited September 2016
    I wonder how venting works for those of us with the solid roof? It opens the driver's and passenger's windows a crack? Say a half inch? Then if it rains, does it close the windows?

    Same question about rain for the panoramic roof. Will it close the pano roof if it detects rain?
  • JADJAD
    edited November -1
    @UnshodBob, I believe the venting is through the HVAC system, not windows and roof. AC compressor only turns on if really needed, usually blowing fresh air through vents is enough.

    Can someone lock their kids in the car in the hot sun and see :)

    Just in case, yes that was sarcasm....
  • edited November -1
    The 12 hour feature of the 8.1 temperature thresholds will be great for car camping. Also nice that the screen stays active for the passenger after the driver leaves.
  • edited November -1
    @JAD - thanks for the clarification. I didn't think of that possibility. Nice not to have to worry about rain coming in through cracked open windows. I used to leave my ICE car windows cracked open at work during hot days, but sometimes it would start pouring (even here in SoCal) and people'd have to run out to close their windows. Being retired, that never happens anymore. :)
  • edited November -1
    105 degrees is the standard setting for hot tubs. Definitely survivable. 8.1 optionality on setting will be better.
  • edited September 2016
    Camping mode for the win! (8.1 temp thresholds + screen dimming, etc)
  • edited November -1
    The idea is that if you *forget* the kids or dog in the car, it will prevent massive overheating and possible death of the occupants. And it only works if you are above 20% SOC, too, so it is no guarantee of anything. You still aren't supposed to *intentionally* leave kids or pets in the car. Isn't it illegal most everywhere to do that? Usually when I read about a case like that, it seems like the parent went in somewhere for alcohol or drugs and lost track of the time. That's insane *and* ludicrous! And a tragedy.
  • edited September 2016
    If the rain sensor indicator were exposed to the API it would make it possible for applications not only to open or close the roof as they do now, but also to close them in case of rain. Venting the roof by opening it seems like a nice idea, but I don't expect Tesla to risk it just because they can.
  • edited November -1
    @Bob
    Hope it's not illegal to leave my dog in an air conditioned Model S. That would cramp my style.
  • edited September 2016
    Someone might break your window to get him out.
  • edited September 2016
    Pungoteague_Dave mentioned that "105 degrees is the standard setting for hot tubs." It is also a few degrees cooler than the standard setting under a shade tree in Phoenix in July. I've heard rumors that people lived in Phoenix before air conditioning was common.
  • edited November -1
    @lil
    That's why I created a sign much to my dismay.
  • edited November -1
    @Bighorn - here's something from the web:

    https://www.animallaw.info/topic/table-state-laws-protect-animals-left-parked-vehicles

    Look up your state. My state, California, has a law. Looks like only about 22 states have a law. I assume children would be better protected than pets, but you never know! :)
  • edited September 2016
    I found a site that lists only about 19 states with a law protecting children. So, I guess we *really* love output pets. :)

    http://www.kidsandcars.org/resources/state-laws/
  • edited November -1
    S/output/our
  • edited November -1
    brec | September 22, 2016
    I've heard rumors that people lived in Phoenix before air conditioning was common.

    Why would anyone do that?
  • edited November -1
    Cool Feature!
    I will disable it as soon as I get back to my car seeing how I don't have kids or pets in my car. I don't want my A/C cycling on & off all day to cool the car for no reason. Wear & Tear.
  • edited September 2016
    MilesMD88 - i live in the Phienix area, and when I am out in the hot months the inside probably gets up to over 150 degrees. This is probably not good for the interior and it sure is not fun getting into that car when I get back. I realize I could ore-condition the car, and have done that at times, but this feature will be a godsend. I won't have to worry about high interior temps any more.
  • edited November -1
    I agree with MilesMD88. I leave my car at the airport for days at a time while I'm away; sometimes unplugged as it was the past two weeks losing about 1% SOC per day. I don't care to waste more energy or utilize components for no reason. But I think the idea is a great one!
  • edited November -1
    Interior temps over 105 are routine here in Fresno. My car will be running a/c a lot to keep it below that when parked in the sun for much of the year.
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