Model S

How Much Battery Charge Does Your Model S Lose Per Day?

edited November -1 in Model S
Since the last 2 firmware updates, my 70D battery seems to diminish faster than normal when parked. Before it was an average of 3 miles overnight, sitting in the basement parking. Lately, it has gone up to 6 miles! That's double!

And not always overnight, sometimes it could be during the day while parked outside my workplace.

Today around 2pm I returned to work with 189 miles of charge. I came back to my car at 9pm and my battery was at 183 miles.

I've tried manually powering the car 'off' when it's parked, but that doesn't help as the next day my battery has diminished 6-7 miles. I keep thinking maybe my valet drivers drove my car around outside overnight while I was in bed but my odometer proves me wrong.

This morning it diminished only 3 miles. But during the afternoon, like I stated above, the battery went down 6 miles while parked outside for 6 hours! (That's a 9 mile loss just parked!) I know Los Angeles weather has been a bit cooler lately but it hasn't been so cold as to affect the battery that much, has it?

I've turned off cabin-overheat protection and the 'always-connected' feature. The car is also in range mode.

At this diminishing rate, if I go away on a holiday for say a month, and leave my battery at 90%, my battery would be dead or nearly dead by the time I get back.

What could be eating up the battery faster? :-( Help..!
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Comments

  • edited November -1
    I'm gettin battery life anxiety.
  • edited December 2016
    There is an option to keep your car Always Connected, if you disable it your battery will not drain as much. My 85D loses about a mile a day. By disabling that option, it might take a little longer to connect with the app, and also the car might take a couple of more seconds to wake up after a long park, Hope that helps!
  • edited December 2016
    Sorry, disregard my last comment. I didn't notice that you had already disabled that option.
  • edited December 2016
    I think it has to do with ambient temperature. Tesla has an active heating and cooling system that results in vampire drain. You are observing the drop in temperature which results in more energy spent heating and conditioning battery pack
  • edited November -1
    Re-check the cabin overheat protection setting to make sure it's still disabled. If you installed an update after you turned it off, it might have turned back on again.
  • edited November -1
    yes, i've re-checked overheat protection and it's off. I did notice when I 'shut down' the car (by stepping out, reaching over and pressing 'power off') that the car doesn't turn off all the way. I can still hear the ringing sound from the battery heating/cooling system.

    Tesla told me months ago that it was normal. I told them that the ringing never stops though....and they said that's normal too. But when I drove their loaner P85+ the ringing would turn on when I drove the car aggressively, and later when I came back to the car the ringing would be off. So the heating cooling system only turns on when it's needed.

    Does anyone here with 2016 Model S here the ringing sound of the battery cooling system and is it always on? Even when you're parked or stopped at a parking light?

    Thanks!
  • edited November -1
    *hear
  • edited November -1
    *stop light. Ugh, sorry for my bad grammar--I was rush-typing while getting ready for work.
  • edited November -1
    Well, for starters, where are you located?. I am guessing somewhere where it still gets hot because you messed with the cabin temp setting.

    The car's BMS is always working. If you are indeed in hot climate, and the temperatures just so happened to go up, it may very well be the BMS doing its thing.

    Do also keep in mind that if the car is plugged in and the range drops by 10 miles, the charging will start up again and charge it back up to the original SOC.

    I have had my S85 for nearly 3 years now and never paid attention the any range loss during the day. I have noticed the difference between what the miles are when I get the "Charging complete" notification and what it says in the morning, but typically that is only 2- 3 miles off.
  • edited December 2016
    I've never noticed what I would describe as a "ringing" sound coming from my 2016 S85; I've only heard what sounds like a fan, which sometimes runs briefly after I turn off the car.

    I lose about 2-3 miles/day when my car is parked, both before and after installing 8.0. My car is usually parked in my garage in south FL, so there's not much fluctuation in temperature throughout the year. The "always connected" setting hasn't made much of a difference in how much I lose daily.
  • edited December 2016
    Okay, it happened again this morning. Last night, in the basement parking garage at 1am, I 'powered-off' my car at 171 miles.

    This morning, it started at 165 miles. It is not cold or hot in my apartment's basement garage.

    Sigh...

    And maybe that slight ringing sound is the fan but it never turns off. Sometimes it's louder sometimes it's faint, but I can always here some sort of ringing. I'll call Tesla and see what they make of the battery drain.
  • edited November -1
    My gosh, this is 12 miles depleted within 18 hours.... called Tesla a few times this morning. No one's picking up. Gr8.... dontcha hate leaving voicemails?
  • edited November -1
    @dpena23 - you reference turning off cabin overheat, but what about the smart pre-conditioning? That's a separate feature and could be trigging the HVAC system to turn on based upon thinking you're going to be leaving for work in the morning or return home in the evening. I know I tried enabling it when my MS 90D was new, but after going into the garage one evening and hearing the AC running after I'd been home several hours, I decided to disable that feature.

    Is there also any chance you are leaving the app open on your phone or other tablet device such that this is continuing to communicate with the car? Or by extreme chance, are you using a program like VisibleTesla to record data from your MS? Either of those might be preventing your car from fully going to "sleep". I know the first day or two I was using VisibleTesla I saw upwards of 5-10 mile parasitic loss and then dug in and realized how I can configure it to allow the car to go to sleep while still monitoring some data at a reduced rate.

    Also, do you have an idea what the temperature is in your basement garage? I find that even with temperatures in the 45-50 degree range battery cold soaks enough that I am starting to see more of a vampire drop.
  • bpbp
    edited November -1
    I've had my car parked since Sunday while we're on a long trip. The car is outside in a parking lot - temperatures have been in the 40s to 60s - and I'm seeing about 10 miles of range lost per day.

    For past trips, when the car has been parked in a garage, in higher temperatures, the loss was closer to 3 miles per day.

    Unless 8.0 has re-introduced the vampire drain problems we were seeing before "sleep mode" was introduced, the increased loss rate is more likely due to colder outside temperatures and having to periodically run a heater to keep the battery pack within its operating range.
  • edited December 2016
    bp - I am hoping it is just the extreme cold we are experiencing here - i don't remember these drops that I am seeing in my car right now though compared to last year. I would hope though that it is not 8.0 - but if it is, how would Tesla know? Do we need to ask them about it? Again, i am not saying it is the version 8.0 and it may be normal I just don't remember the numbers being so drastic from last year :)
  • edited February 2017
    My 3 weeks old X60D HW1, loose 30 km (18 miles) range in 24 hours. Hear blowing fan sound from the parked car. Energey saving on, and always connected on. If I disable always connected, looks like the range loss is considerably less. With out always connected on, the app does not connect with the car & there is no way to remotley see how much charge is left or any other settings with the app. Talked to the service, but no help. If I leave the car without charging for a week in the airport parking, may risk dead battery!!!
  • edited November -1
    I had S75D before and the range loss was negligible.
  • edited November -1
    I had S75D before and the range loss was negligible.
  • edited February 2017
    Having "always connected" turned off does not stop you from connecting to the car. It just takes longer for the connection to complete.
  • edited November -1
    @nrao - how cold is it where you keep the car? The noise you describe sounds like the battery management system doing its job. Keeping it plugged in will allow it to top off the battery periodically. Try turning Range Mode ON but if the car is in freezing temps it may not help. (I'm in California and have no experience with truly cold conditions.)

    I also have Always Connected off and can connect to my car from the app. It just has to wake the car up first.
  • edited November -1
    There is no way to open up the battery to see the charge visually. An electric vehicle uses a battery management system to know how much charge its batteries have while it is being used and when it is being charged. The way to get an accurate reading of how much charge a battery has is to stop using the battery, in other words measure it when the car is off. While the car is in use other less accurate algorithms are used to guess how much the battery is being drained. Once you turn on your car the number on your dash is updated with a more accurate number. I am not saying this is what is exactly going on but it is my guess from my understanding as an electrical engineering student.
  • edited March 2017
    I let my car sit for 1 week unplugged, and it lost 13% charge, which is just under 2% per day.
    That corresponds to just under 5 miles range per day. (100% = 255 miles).
    2012 P85
  • edited November -1
    How much battery charge does my S lose per day? Goodness !! Lose? Lose you say? I bought this thingamajig on the Internet that pulls electricity out of the air and packs it in my battery. Well anyway, when I forgot and leave the domaflache in the trunk, it wirelessly connects to the charge port and pumps more electricity into the car faster than I can use it.

    I have to be careful where I drive. If I don't drive faster and further than the whatcacallit pulls electricity and sucks it into the charge port, I wind up almost to my destination or home and have too much juice. It makes the car swell up and look bigger than normal. (Or maybe that's just my head?) When I have too much electricity I have to remember to open the charge port to let the excess juice squeeze back out and into the air. I wish there was a notification on the Tesla app that would remind me when there's too much electricity so I would not have to wait for it to dribble out when I get back to the car before I can head home. Oh woe is me, for the complexities of owning a wonderful EV.
  • edited November -1
    Too much Maui Wowie, akikiki :-\
  • edited November -1
    It can be a significant issue. I would think that for somebody who drives only 2500 miles per year, vampire loss could raise the cost per mile significantly. Of course if you look at actual dollar amounts it would still be very small, and more cost effective than an ICE, but if you get down to somebody who drives only 600 miles a year, and ICE might be more cost effective.
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