Model 3

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Cold Weather Range - Model 3

edited November -1 in Model 3
I'm in MN where the Avg. January temp is 23° F - what can one expect for the range during that period?

Comments

  • edited November -1
    Range is a function of the power usage per mile you are getting.

    In the cold, you use more power per mile because of the cold batter and because of running the heat. BUT - there's a big difference between how much power your first mile uses on a cold day than your hundredth mile after the battery is plenty warm.

    That being said, hard to say. You can expect 10-30% drop in max range in most cases but in 2.5 years of Tesla ownership I've never personally driven more than 90% of my max 262 mile range in one single shot so a 10% loss is meaningless. A 30% loss driving up to my in-laws (past/over mountains) in the winter has been typical though, but fortunately, there's a super charger on the way.
  • edited May 2017
    Please excuse my grammar. A bit of a train wreck but you get the point.
  • edited November -1
    For a temperature of 23F, I would expect a 15% drop in highway range based on the numbers on the Tesla site range estimators. The loss is due to the use of the heaters in the car and the higher density of the air.
  • edited November -1
    Keep in mind too that if you warm up your car in the morning before you leave home and before you disconnect it from the charger you should save a fair amount of range loss, at least on that initial part of a trip.
  • edited November -1
    I apologize for my ignorance and I really don't want to be offensive but how do you warm up an electric car, wrap it into blankets?
  • edited November -1
    @LA-Fohlen - On my Leaf I can remotely turn on climate control while it's plugged in and in the garage.

    Similar to a Tesla.
  • edited May 2017
    I thought that Teslas have a battery warmer / cooler that regulates temperature while plugged in. Am I wrong?
  • edited November -1
    @akgolf - thanks for the info!
  • edited November -1
    A couple of different temperature questions I can help with:

    @LA-Fohlen, Quote: "I apologize for my ignorance and I really don't want to be offensive but how do you warm up an electric car, wrap it into blankets?"

    When they say warm up the car, there are a couple of things they are referring to. One is truly warming up the inside of the car so that you're not having to intensely run the heat from the battery when you first start driving to keep yourself warm. The other part is warming up the battery some. Running the cabin heat does this a little bit, but the most direct way of this is charging. If you run some charging for a bit, that actually does generate a decent bit of heat and warms up the battery while you still have wall power and won't have to run the battery heater as much when you start driving.

    @gatorj31, Quote: "I thought that Teslas have a battery warmer / cooler that regulates temperature while plugged in. Am I wrong?"

    You're right, that it does have temperature control systems, but they are used as needed, and there seem to be different acceptable temperature bands that the car uses for when it's just sitting turned off, versus when it is operating. So it will let the car get kind of cold or kind of hot, but will heat or cool if really necessary to keep it from getting to extreme levels that would be harmful to the battery. When you start driving, though, it may run the battery heater some to get it into a more ideal temperature band for better operating performance. So it's kind of both.
  • edited November -1
    Thanks! 30% drop or around 151 miles range then - I've exceeded that in a day - but for the most part I'd be OK - just might need an occasional Super Charge (I live very close to one, so I have that going for me).
  • edited December 2018
    Drove yesterday in 18F temps and range was about 30% less but I was also showing people the car at my destination and used some electricity moving with summon and turning lights on and off etc. Actual driving cost went from .019 to about .03 cents per mile on a round trip of 57 miles. at mostly 70 to 72 mph. I was not expecting to lose that much range in winter. The roads were also dry and clear so when there is snow on the roads range will probably be even less .
  • edited December 2018
    Should add that I preheated the car at my destination were it was not plugged in and only heated the car when I left home (plugged in) for about 5 minutes.
  • edited December 2018
    My experience with my Model S was about a 50% drop in range when the temperature drops below 0F.
  • edited December 2018
    My experience with my Model S was about a 50% drop in range when the temperature drops below 0F.
  • edited December 2018
    I've got a Model 3 in Minneapolis. Range drops have been 30-40% on my daily commute when the weather is below freezing. I imagine a long trip would fair better. The best tip I got was to charge my battery in the morning using the scheduler to have a warm battery in the morning. Yes, the range is a little shocking at first, but for my daily use it has been no big deal. Oh, the other tip is to use the energy graph to predict how much battery you have left, not the gauge. Much more accurate. If it helps, in the summer I was getting over 310 miles range on based on my daily consumption, and AC doesn't have that much of an impact.
  • edited December 2018
    @jakewalz I've been seeing 50% hit below freezing. Probably because I'm comfortable shirt sleeves in the cabin @ 70°F whereas someone like yourself in Minneapolis probably thinks shirt sleeve is 45°F ;-)

    I also agree with both your tip about charging in the morning (I find this doesn't work with 110 volt L1 charger, but does with the 240 volt L2 charger), and using the energy graph (it's consistently within a couple percent of estimate when I arrive).

    I've never gotten 310 miles (but mine is the Performance version)... More like 270 or 280 in the warm weather if I drive like a grandmother...
  • edited December 2018
    Sporadically shutting off the "auto" heat helps. hit the defroster button when frosted windshield becomes too much. Takes me below 300w/mi when in the teens... AWD 19"
  • Model 3 RWD LR 15K miles. Overall, excellent EV! I would fully agree with the posts in this forum. When traveling above 70mph in below zero F temperatures I have experienced 50% range. My 310 getting less than 160 miles of range. Above 80 MPH in COLD weather & you may not make it to the next supercharger! (That’s with preheating the battery, through pre-departure charging & cabin seat heaters only while driving). Looking forward to the new Ultracapacitor impact for acceleration or any other additional positive impact. Thank you Tesla.
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