Model S

Why does it take months to repair a Tesla?

edited November -1 in Model S
I had my model S broken into in Santa Clara by thieves who not only broke out both rear windows but caused more than $7,000 in damage. Had this been any other car, the repairs would have been completed in 2 weeks or less. The paint work was done in a week but Tesla has been unable to get 1 of the 2 windows or the interior door panel shipped to the only authorized repair shop in Sacramento for more than a month. Another friend who was involved in an accident with his model X had his repairs take 3 months. Both of us are out of pocket now paying for rental cars while Tesla does seemingly nothing to repair our vehicles. I've made several calls to customer support who have absolutely no clue how or when parts will ever be shipped. This is unacceptable. Have any of you been in a similar situation and, if so, what did you do to get Tesla to care?
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Comments

  • JADJAD
    edited November -1
    That is why Tesla is rolling out their own collision centers as stated in the share holders meeting. They have acknowledged the problem and working on the fix.
  • edited June 2017
    And that does the OP what good???
  • Tesla is supposed to be working on the spare parts problem, but until they actually fix it, they really should be providing loaners. Looks like they have plenty of older vehicles in stock to pull from.
  • edited November -1
    The loaners are for the cars in service. They don't always have enough for those who are getting their cars serviced.
  • edited June 2017
    The issue is parts availability, not repair shops to install them. This isn't the first thread complaining about that. Tesla has gotten very good at building the cars but the back end service and repair has not kept pace. Que Model 3.
  • edited November -1
    I have to say that this issue nearly stopped me from purchasing a Tesla and that I'm still very worried about being down for months due to lack of parts or service time, especially with the Model 3 coming out. I knew in advance that EAP didn't work that well and that I would be a beta tester. I'm ok with that. I also didn't buy FSD because there are no FSD features at this point. But parts availability is a different issue and one that may only be solved by changing the culture. If Tesla makes continuous changes each week to parts, it is going to be hard to stockpile enough of them to fix existing cars.
  • edited June 2017
    its sucks big time and noone really knows how much untill their car is in that position. Some wont care because they have more then 1 tesla or have other cars they can drive but for most people this would suck big time. Like getting a flat in a tesla....that sucks too. But it can be fixed in a day or a few hours if you are lucky.

    I feel for the OP and others who have to rent a car when this happens but doesnt the insurance pay for a rental?? i know when i take my mdx to service they just give me a loaner for the day or the weekend if needed for free...even for however long it takes. My friend has an mdx new and has had major issues with it and has been driving a loaner from the dealer for 2 months while they figure out whats wrong...another neighbor bought a new mercedes suv and has had alot of issues so i see her driving a diff new loaner every week for 2 months now.
  • edited November -1
    Insurance pays for rentals for a limited time frame only, usually around thirty days, depending on the policy.
  • edited June 2017
    Tesla's response to this issue has been even slower than their parts supply system. I might have bought my second S if not for this issue.
  • edited June 2017
    i can imagine that model 3 will be even worse in this regard...i mean some idiots will break into model 3 thinking that nice touch screen can be ripped out and sold for $$...or with so many on the road the likelyhood of an accident may be greater n the model 3.
  • edited June 2017
    The next time I am at precision auto I will post a picture of the many Teslas that are actually being worked on. The shop manager said 60% of his business is tesla vehicles and all are being worked in at the moment.

    The problem is not Tesla, it's the body shop from what I've seen. I'm sure a few delays are very real, but it's the body shop causing the delays.
  • edited November -1
    I had my car repaired twice at a body shop - once it took 7 days ($6,000) and once 10 days ($16,000).
  • edited November -1
    @SilverP85plus

    It's not the body shops. Kniesel's in Sacramento has an amazing reputation and they have an entire facility dedicated to Teslas. They used to be able to work directly with the Tesla dealership in Rocklin but corporate changed their policy and are now forcing them to work with Tesla out of the the east coast for some reason (parts depot?) I really miss my car and am starting to get pissed. My insurance company only covered 30 days. I guess Tesla doesn't care that I'll be out of pocket another $2,000 - $3,000 because they can't source a rear passenger window or interior door panel? If I ran my business like this, it wouldn't exist.
  • edited November -1
    I would contact the parts depot in East coast personally to see what the hold up is. Ask the shop for the number.
  • edited June 2017
    Maybe it is time for a new insurance company? My car was in the shop much less than 30 days, but my insurance does not have a limit on the number of days.
  • edited June 2017
    Elroy Jetson | June 20, 2017
    If I ran my business like this, it wouldn't exist."

    Public companies are different since they have professional investors that mainly focus on fueling potential future values opportunities hopes.
  • edited June 2017
    @Elroy - Always disappointing when you can't drive your own car, and worse stuck with a rental.

    If you plan your buying based on accident damage repairs, you should select a low-end high-volume car. They actually get dramatically more accidents, so parts are usually stocked at higher levels.

    If you go the other direction - rare, high value cars (Ferrari, Lamborghini, etc.) you can expect a 5-6 month wait for parts. Many parts are made to order and not stocked.

    For similar competitive cars (high-end BMW, Benz, etc.) wait times are similar - 2 months is not unusual. Now Tesla can clearly do better, but currently parts delivery is similar to other makes.
  • edited June 2017
    TeslaTap.com | June 20, 2017
    For similar competitive cars (high-end BMW, Benz, etc.) wait times are similar - 2 months is not unusual. Now Tesla can clearly do better, but currently parts delivery is similar to other makes."

    Not true for many parts, especially those mfg & distributed by OEM & other hi quality reliable substitutes,
  • edited November -1
    Yes, it's common. It's Tesla's fault. Silver is FOS. Contact Jon McNeill at Tesla. He seems to have a little pull :-)
  • edited November -1
    It's not black and white. It depends on the body shop. :)
  • edited June 2017
    @sp_tesla - I agree for many parts are available quickly from most manufacturers including Tesla. It's the rarer parts that often take far longer to get. It only takes one part out of the 20-30 parts typically needed to repair an accident to delay the repair. Usually the hardest parts to get are non-wear external skin parts from any manufacturer. They are not made by OEMs, and are rarely stocked at service departments.

    I've gotten a number of parts from Tesla (for myself and in annual services). The 99% of the parts were available immediately or within 24 hours. Service even got me a 300 lb DU they didn't have in stock in about 12 hours. The longer delay was one part took a week (the front chrome Tesla "T" that the service department had never ordered before), and I was in no rush for it.
  • edited November -1
    barrykmd, KMA :p
  • edited June 2017
    barrykmd | June 20, 2017
    Yes, it's common. It's Tesla's fault. Silver is FOS. Contact Jon McNeill at Tesla. He seems to have a little pull :-)

    You're suggesting he contacts someone that agrees with me 100%? KMA AGAIN! ;-)
  • edited November -1
    This is so riveting. :)
  • edited June 2017
    I have a Chevy that is a very low production car. Took 2 weeks to get some simple recall parts, then another 2 weeks to get a steering wheel because the leather was peeling. Crash parts on it are months from what I have heard, I have even heard of months for a rim.......

    Drive an oddball vehicle and this stuff happens. I am considering the switch to the Tesla because the "Chevy" is a Holden that just went out of production in April with under 14K on this continent parts will always be bad to get. The Model S is more common and being built at an ever greater rate so long term I am optimistic parts availability will be better than my Chevy.
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