Model 3

Tesla Maintenance Costs?

edited November -1 in Model 3
In addition to obvious tire and brakes & lube maintenance, what type of service schedule and related costs can I expect after purchasing a Model 3?
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Comments

  • edited November -1
    Wind shield wipers and fluid. Your second annual service will run about $600 but they will look over the entire vehicle and correct anything that is wrong under warranty.
  • edited November -1
    For those who already own a Tesla - do they have a pre-paid maintenance option?
  • edited June 2017
    Just tires for me and windshield washer fluid. Brakes and lube not so much ... you don't use your brakes that much due to regenerative braking and there is nothing to 'lube'. Cabin air filter I guess ... I used Tesla service when I came off warranty but not since ... nothing to do.
  • edited June 2017
    This is one of the questions I have also had. EVs are supposed to be relatively low maintenance and cheap to maintain compared to ICE cars. However, when I look at the maintenance plan costs, they are much higher than what I pay to maintain my cars.

    How do I reconcile these numbers with low maintenance costs?
    Is it recommended to NOT get the maintenance plan?
  • edited June 2017
    I think the general consensus is that the plans for the Model 3 will be less expensive. Tesla said they didn't want the service centers to be a profit maker but I'm also sure they didn't want them to lose money either. So, with limited maintenance customers, the cost per customer is higher. With the number of 3's coming out they should be able to charge less and still break even or even make some for expansion.
  • edited November -1
    Are there model S owners here that have not gotten the service plan? What is their experience?
  • edited November -1
    I never got the service plan but pay as I go. Do services annually which works out at $450 ever 28000 miles for me. Services are not mandatory but I recommend them for piece of mind. Have had 5. Did my first 2 at 12500 mile intervals and Tesla told me I didn't need them more often than once a year. Have more than 119000 miles in my good as new classic model S 85
  • edited June 2017
    I didn't buy a plan because I'm only doing services on the even numbered years. Several people do that.
  • edited June 2017
    @Rocky - SAME!

    We spend $0 in the first year of ownership.
    $600 in the second (year 2 maintenance) and got WAY MORE than that out of what Tesla decided to replace on our car just as a preliminary measure.

    No oil changes, emissions testing.
    Far fewer brakes - because there are technically two sets, the ones you'd change regularly are expected to last 100,000 miles.
  • edited June 2017
    Correction. It is $600 per service. You can decrease costs to $475 by buying the plan.
  • edited June 2017
    Don't forget your initial set up cost for a home charging solution. Annual service cost about $600. Annual car detailing expenses depends on the owner.
  • edited June 2017
    When are people going to realize that the "maintenance plans" are optional. Meaning those related costs are not required. Whereas skipping oil changes/ transmission fluid changes are not an option on an ICE.

    Brakes? What brakes. Based on the minimal wear on my brakes after 80,000 miles, I was told that my pads will last upwards of 300,000 miles.

    Now obviously none of us has seen the maintenance/service book for the Model 3, but on the Model S you have 4 things that need to be done. Every 5K, rotate your tires, every 2 years flush/replace brake fluid, every 4 years flush/replace battery coolant and finally, every 12 years, change the ATF in the gear reduction "box".

    Oh if your Model S or X was made after Feb 2017, at the I year mark they want the ATF changed out in the gear reduction box and I believe every 5 years after that.
  • edited June 2017
    18 month owner of the S. $0.
    Granted any car with 25K miles should not be in the shop much.

    @High Plains Drifter yes the home charging solution, good point. I suppose that was around $50 for the cable and breaker and outlet (50 amp).
  • edited June 2017
    They changed the prices of the annual services last year because of realizing this aspect how the even numbered years have actual things that need to be done, whereas the odd numbered years are feel good checkups.
    $400, $700, $400, $900.
    So the total cost works out similarly if you do all four, but it's hard on the people who were planning to just do two at $600 each.
  • edited June 2017
    I am not sure, but for those who plan on getting the extended warranty, isn't meeting every maintenance appointment necessary to keeping the warranty valid? I thought for sure someone said that in another thread.
  • edited June 2017
    Pkalhan: Nope. When Tesla changed their Warranty to allow for 'Infinite Miles' with 85 kWh battery packs and higher, it was retroactive. They removed a prior expectation of regular service/maintenance. I believe that requirement was only in place for those cars that were purchased as part of a 'Guaranteed Buback' program. And that program was ended some time in 2015, three years after it began.
  • edited June 2017
    EV maintenance is a pittance compared to petrol operated vehicles.
  • edited November -1
    gotcha, thanks Red
  • edited June 2017
    Like jordanrichard said the Tesla maintenance plan is optional. Even for ICE car the company can not deny your warranty service unless the issue is directly related to a missing recommended maintenance item. They can not say, for example, that they will not cover you wheel fall off because you did not do the scheduled oil change.
  • edited June 2017
    Just and FYI...I found this on the Tesla Website...

    If I choose not to service my Tesla vehicle, will this void my warranty or Resale Value Guarantee?

    It is highly recommended that you service your Tesla vehicle every 12 months or 12,500 miles (20,000 km), whichever occurs first. If you do not follow this recommendation, your New Vehicle Limited Warranty will not be affected. During the agreement period of the Extended Service Agreement, your coverage may be affected if recommended service is not performed. See the Extended Service Agreement Terms and Conditions for further details. If you are financing your Tesla vehicle through Tesla Financing, you will only be eligible for the full Resale Value Guarantee if your Tesla vehicle is brought in for service per the above recommended timeline.

    It does look like the extended warranty can be effected if the recommended service is not performed. Just something to think about.
  • edited November -1
    Go 4 years or 50,000 miles in an ICE car without an oil change and see if they will still honor the warranty.
  • edited November -1
    @Pkalhan, Quote: "I am not sure, but for those who plan on getting the extended warranty, isn't meeting every maintenance appointment necessary to keeping the warranty valid? I thought for sure someone said that in another thread."

    Yes, that is absolutely true, and I don't know why @Red Sage gave you a wrong answer. I read through the text of the extended warranty when they refined the wording of it several months ago, and it does specifically require you to get all of those recommended annual services. That is another big part of the reason that adds up to it being much more expensive and why I'm not getting it. In addition to just the price of buying it being higher, that's another $800 worth of services I would have to do that I wasn't going to, just to have the warranty in effect.
  • edited November -1
    "... just to have the warranty in effect.", that would apply to the extended warranty.
  • edited June 2017
    Looking at the services performed, I find that $475 (or $600) a bit excessive. Part of that is a result of paying $110 per hour (the Minneapolis rate) for services such as cabin air filter replacement, wiper replacement, and tire rotation, and other "semi-skilled" services. As opposed to the skilled services they provide.

    An ICE vehicle is no better. Take a look at their "regular" services. My Hyundai dealer charges $60 to replace the cabin air filter. A price Tony Soprano would be embarrassed to charge. But most people have no clue how easy it is and pay that price.
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