Model 3

Was the Model 3 reveal just a facade?

edited August 2017 in Model 3
Unless I'm missing something, more than a month in, still not a single owner review of the car. Haven't read one thing indicating that regular customers have been invited to configure their cars?

Was the original release to 30 employees just a facade so Tesla could present the appearance of meeting a deadline for a change, but the car is really not truly ready for production? Seems like if it was, someone would have posted that they've been invited to configure and order their car??

Please correct me if I'm wrong (Oh and I know there's a few of you that will jump at the chance to!! LOL).

Just trying to figure out if this thing is really ready to roll or if we're still several months out before even being able to order? My estimated delivery originally said Oct. 2017. Either that means I'm really, really high on the list and they only need 30 days. But with as many orders as there are, my guess is, if they haven't taken your order yet, October, 2017 isn't happening.
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Comments

  • edited August 2017
    It wasn't a facade... Why do I say that?... Because Tesla is a public company. They have to answer to people much more important than Model 3 buyers; People that work for the SEC, Major shareholders, PUC, etc...
    If they say they have started production, & in reality, have not... That points towards security fraud.
    You may not get your car in October, but that can be attributed to a lot of things.
  • edited August 2017
    I would lean toward the reveal _not_ qualifying as being a real release of the car. More like an internal milestone than an actual release. But they seem to be making adequate progress to get us our cars on time so while I'm a bit impatient I'm not worried.

    Carl
  • edited August 2017
    They have been up front about it for a LONG time especially for Tesla Standards. Current cars aren't mass produced by robots, they are mostly hand made. They said 30 cars for July, maybe 150 in August and the 'dream' (fantasy?) is 20,000 a month in December.
  • I would add that we won't see a single non-employee registration until ALL the employees on the list have gotten their cars. The configurator for us mortals will open before that is done but no one is getting a car until all these employees have been delivered to.

    Also of note, I believe it was opened to SpaceX employees as well as Tesla. Correct me if I'm wrong.
  • *edit: There is way more than 30 employees on that list
  • edited November -1
    They are still delivering cars but only to employees. There have been photos taken/articles written about cars being seen coming out of the factory.

    The initial ramp is small (relatively) - They aren't supposed to start getting to larger numbers until october. I would expect non-employees to start configuring in the next couple/few weeks if the October delivery estimate for non-employees holds true.
  • @KP in NPT: I go park by the Tesla track at lunch a couple of times per week and watch all the pretty Model 3's doing their spin around the track. Pretty exciting.
  • edited August 2017
    @shannon.lgrizzly:
    "I would add that we won't see a single non-employee registration until ALL the employees on the list have gotten their cars."

    I doubt that's true for the simple reason that most employees probably won't want to pay for the long range + premium version. So they'll sell to those employees that _do_ want it then in October sell more of the expensive version to non-employees customers that want it, then only when they start producing the base version will they go back and sell to the rest of the employees.

    Carl
  • edited August 2017
    Its lie having a huse built. Allow an extra 6 months from what you are told. I ordered a Lotus Elise and was toldthey would start delivering in April. Then they found ouf that some parts had to be redesigned to meet regulations so a token car was delivered around July and then people got them starting around September or October.
    If employees find a major design flaw or defect in a part then it will tie up production until a new part canbe redesigned or a new supplier can be found. The estimated delivery thing has increased by a month for me since it started. My neighbor who. has a Model S and.ordered. a long range battery car on 4/1 said he is due about a month ahead of me but doent plan on getting it until. at least January even though his estimate is for November/December.
    Id rather wait than have them rush and screw up and have to have a major recall because a robot messed up a weld or didnt torque a tie rod correctly which results in an accident. On the Lotus the first few batches were Ok but once they increased production they screwed up on the crimps on the oil cooler lines resulting in crashes due to oil getting over the tires andalso engine damage. Had to wait over a month after dropping off the car for the recall since they found out the lfitting on the lines had rusted on to the oil coolers and they did have enough spare ones in stock.
  • edited August 2017
    Was the original release to 30 employees just a facade so Tesla could present the appearance of meeting a deadline for a change, but the car is really not truly ready for production? Seems like if it was, someone would have posted that they've been invited to configure and order their car??
    ----

    No, it was not a facade. Tesla always said that they would release the first cars to employees to "debug" the car and then a few months later, they would release cars to non-employees as they ramp up production. This is exactly what they are doing.

    Also, I think a lot of people misunderstood what the event was. Because the event was broadcast to the public, people assumed that it was the reveal part 2. But the event was always going to be an internal milestone celebration rather than a reveal event. That's why Musk did not talk a lot about the car's features but really just gave a pep talk to the employees before letting them get their cars. The purpose of the event was to celebrate the fact that Model 3 production had started. It was never intended to be a reveal to the public.
  • edited August 2017
    @P90DX - "My estimated delivery originally said Oct. 2017. "
    Really? Or did it say Oct 2017 - Dec 2017.
    There lies the false advertising .....
  • edited August 2017
    OP, have you considered that the current employee owners are almost certainly bound by a NDA? The last thing Tesla will do is allow employees to publicize early production problems.

    Relax. For once, Tesla is achieving their deadlines (so far).
  • edited August 2017
    I just remember with the Model X, they did the reveal / delivery to the first owners, then almost immediately, the car was able to be ordered / configured on line. So I guess I was expecting the same scenario with the Model 3.

    One one hand, glad they're taking the time to make the car right. But would be nice if they would provide a narrower estimate window on when actual production will begin. Have a lease ending on another car, trying to figure out if the Model 3 will come in time or if I need to make arrangements to either extend the lease, but if so, for how long. If it's for a month or two, no big deal, but if it's 6, 8, 10, 12 months, then it doesn't make sense. Also have to think about the other car running out of warranty after the 3 year mark when the lease is up and pay the registration for a full year, etc...

    Just saying, it would be nice if they'd let us know our place in line and a little more specifics so people can plan accordingly.
  • edited August 2017
    @ KP in NPT | August 30, 2017
    http://insideevs.com/tesla-model-3-deliveries-continue/


    According to that article, sounds like we may know more tomorrow by the sales figures they release on "Friday". The article only confirms 9 cars ready. Hopefully the sales figures released tomorrow reveal that they met their target of 150 vehicles delivered this month.
  • edited November -1
    Only 100 were expected for Aug. 1500 for Sep.
  • edited August 2017
    @hoffmannjames:
    "Tesla always said that they would release the first cars to employees to "debug" the car and then a few months later, they would release cars to non-employees as they ramp up production."

    Tesla did not "always" say that. Sure that's what appears to be happening now but it's not accurate to say that Tesla has said that from the beginning.

    Carl
  • edited November -1
    Things seem to be progressing in much the same way as it did after the Model S first deliveries ceremony. It is just employees getting invitations instead of Signature reservationists this time.
  • edited November -1
    Just a facade? Too early to know, I'd say.

    The Model X initial delivery event was clearly a facade. Six hand-built cars delivered to insiders, and then nothing for months. It was the better part of a year before any semblance of volume production took place. The term "production hell" was coined, apparently meaning "Holy crap, we better figure out how we're gonna produce this thing!"

    For Model 3, delivering 30 hand-built cars to insiders obviously means nothing, unless the production ramp is really underway and going A LOT faster than Model X did. Elon is exhibiting great confidence, so either things are going well, or he's learned to lie with conviction.

    I suppose we won't really know for a few months. If we start to see thousands of cars produced weekly and delivered with high quality, then it was not just a facade. If Elon keeps tap dancing about S-curves and unreliable suppliers and how you actually need all of the parts to build a car, then we'll know it was a sham.

    I really can't even guess. I'd give it about 50-50. But I hope it's for real.
  • edited August 2017
    I don't think the 30 model 3's were hand built. The line is in place. I am sure that every part that a robot is supposed to do was done by that robot. They were just being very careful to inspect everything to confirm things are correct, or to make corrections where needed.

    My understanding in the auto industry is that "hand built" refers to using non-production, low volume tooling to make cars.
  • edited August 2017
    I have been part of many automotive launches, major automotive manufacturers Take about 4-6 weeks to reach full production after the 1st saleable vehicle produced.
  • edited August 2017
    My brother is an engineer for GM and has a hand in getting new products out to market. He told me that at GM those 30 cars given out employees would be considered 'pre-production' . Until you see regular joe reviews I dont consider the car 'out.' That being said, I do believe that the model 3 was designed to be much easier to produce than previous models, and that Tesla has learned a lot. Im optimistic that they can meet their delivery schedule.
  • edited August 2017
    Tesla is a publicly traded company. It's not a facade. If it was it would be security fraud. When they published 30 in July, 100 in August and 1500 in September those would be minimum numbers. They learned the hard way with the major FU with the MX.
  • edited August 2017
    @ramihanna616 agreed, but they are calling them saleable vehicles.

    It usually works like this:

    Hand built mules, during this process you start to identify what your assembly process, tooling requirements,manpower needs,and quality

    Non-Saleable 1 start of verification of assembly process, tooling dial in

    Non-saleable 2 validate process, tooling, cycle time, quality

    Saleable 1 captured fleet....employee vehicles

    Saleable 2 sale to general public
  • edited August 2017
    Just watching my stock it would be nice if they could meet deadlines and get the cars delivered to owners. We own a model S and we are still at the back of the line contrary to what was stated. This really sucks this process of delivery or non delivery.
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