Model 3

Let us be thankful for the Tesla Supercharger network

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Comments

  • Let’s be thankful that 80% of EVs charge at home. I have never needed a SC in 30,000 miles. Have charged at home or office for over 8 years.
  • > @Bighorn said:
    > Thankful for over 350k free supercharger miles.

    You certainly were able to take advantage of Tesla while pursuing your super charger hobby. How much would 350k miles have cost?
  • Not done yet, but about $30,000 at 26 cents per kWh. Still have two cars with free supercharging.
  • That is amazing! How much time do you think you have spent charging?
  • It’s one of the main reasons why I will only buy Tesla for rest of my time. There is no other car to buy. All other EVs are a joke and looking at those independent charging stations covered in weeds as I use the Tesla supercharger only proves the point.
  • No idea. Much more challenging calculation. I don’t have a total number of superchargers used, just unique visits. 986.
  • So, howie: Typical charge on the road is to top off to 80% or so. That takes about 20 minutes. Every couple of hundred miles, or 3-4 hours. That calls for a bathroom break, maybe a cup of coffee, and likely a meal: i.e., refueling the people.
    So, with that short a time with the car peacefully charging whilst the people do their thing, what do we care about the charging time?
    Or are you doing your shortie selling thing, putting down EVs in general?
    Jeez, what an idiot.
  • He spent 2 years building this phony backstory and he blew it all in one month. I think it was the fsd discussions that sent him into the spiral of panic. He had been so careful up to that point.
  • Going cross country, I keep up with most people on the same route. Most people don’t average much more than 60 mph over 1000 miles.
  • @Spuzzz: I think it's a combination of FSD, to which none of the other car manufacturers have a serious answer, the high stock price, meaning that funding new factories isn't a real problem, and the approach (finally!) of competition in the form of BEVs from other manufacturers that are squarely aimed at the model S of a few years ago. Anything, just anything, to knock the stock price down and scare away investors. And it strikes me that this panic might be due to something aimed directly at FISHEV's and howard's pocketbooks: The threat that if they don't make some progress, pronto, they'll be out the door.
  • Thankful for the SuCh'r network - it's a Godsend.

    Not thankful for the .35 kW charge on I-5 in Cali. Practically gasoline prices. C'mon son!
  • > @howard_98305575 said:
    > Let’s be thankful that 80% of EVs charge at home. I have never needed a SC in 30,000 miles. Have charged at home or office for over 8 years.

    Bc you don't travel in your Tesla and phony troll that hates Tesla. One year of ownership and we did two major road trips and as you can imagine used Superchargers to be able to complete them. Future is here and Tesla AP is great on road trips. Something you would never know.
  • > @Tronguy said:
    > So, howie: Typical charge on the road is to top off to 80% or so. That takes about 20 minutes. Every couple of hundred miles, or 3-4 hours. That calls for a bathroom break, maybe a cup of coffee, and likely a meal: i.e., refueling the people.
    > So, with that short a time with the car peacefully charging whilst the people do their thing, what do we care about the charging time?
    > Or are you doing your shortie selling thing, putting down EVs in general?
    > Jeez, what an idiot.

    The metric actually isn't how much time you spend charging on road trips. it's how much time you spend charging the rest of the time, which is of course the few seconds it take you to plug in your car. The "five minute fill up" is a fallacy. From putting on your shoes to finally returning home after a trip down the road to fill up it's always a lot more than five minutes. Not everyone has a gas station on the way to work or near his or her home. Four ten minute stops in a month is the same time as a forty minute Super Charger session.
  • The fact that the Tesla Nav is fully integrated with the SOC and the SC network is amazing.
    Super charger = peace of mind
  • > @Tronguy said:
    > So, howie: Typical charge on the road is to top off to 80% or so. That takes about 20 minutes. Every couple of hundred miles, or 3-4 hours.

    Let's let Tesla do the math for us, shall we? Plugging in several destinations it averages about 6 min of charging time per mile. Denver to LA is 1033 miles and takes 170 min. The longest stop 60 minutes the shortest is 20 min with 5 stops total. Every 200 miles is more like 33 minutes.

    Bighorn's 350k miles if all done at superchargers on average is roughly 58,000 minutes, 972 hours or 41 days.

    > @Bighorn said:
    > Going cross country, I keep up with most people on the same route. Most people don’t average much more than 60 mph over 1000 miles.

    Broomfield CO to Gilbert AZ is a 863 mile trip. I run the trip in under 12 hours at an average speed of 75mph. I have often considered taking the Tesla but it is by Tesla's route planner more like 16 hours and 765 miles taking the most direct slowest route to optimize charging in very good weather. That is 50 miles per hour on average. This is why I don't and would not take a Tesla on a long-distance trip.

    I must say I am passing more and more Telsa's on 25 and 40 so there are a few that enjoy the leisurely drive. From what SC stations I have seen on the route they are not in ideal locations as far as food and activities go. Guess that is why you have all the entertainment options in the car.
  • I call BS.
  • Run the numbers yourself, big guy.
  • Google says 13:28 not including food or fuel stops. Do the math.
  • 13:28 + 30 + 10 + 10 = 14:18

    60.3 mph.
  • No math needed, just facts.

    I average 80-85 on most of 25 and 40. I make one 10-15 min fuel stop and two brief rest stops. Holbrook to Payson to Gilbert is 10 to 15 over for most of the way.

    From a return trip early in the year pulling into the neighborhood.

    https://cubeupload.com/im/TeslaP3D/5955EE57CB7D45D3946B.jpeg
  • @howie: Geez. I bomb up and down the East Coast and out to Michigan on a regular basis. SC's are mostly at rest stops on I-95 between NYC and DC; south of DC and north of NYC they tend to be at shopping plazas or malls just off the various interstates, where there's restaurants and a bit of shopping.
    It's rather the opposite of "hard to find".
    Let's see: Peak charge rates at G2/G3 SC's is around 300-450 miles of charge per hour. That's about 6 miles per minute. Admittedly, that max rate doesn't stick around when one gets up to 50% of full charge; but it really is about 20 minutes to 80%, which is all one really needs. On a M3 LR, 80% of 320 miles is 256 miles; at 65 mph, that's four hours, and most people can't achieve 65 mph constant, anyway, what with lights and such. Leave at 7 a.m., stop at 11 and take a break; pick up again and stop at 3 for lunch; drive 3 more hours, get dinner, and stay for the night or go onto the next stop. The SC's are _that_ common. Check out the map: https://www.tesla.com/supercharger. It looks like an attack of the zits, and more are going in faster than EA can dream of. Check out https://supercharge.info/changes; there's what looks like a couple-three going in, per day, and the rate is accelerating.
  • > @howard_98305575 said:
    > Broomfield CO to Gilbert AZ is a 863 mile trip. I run the trip in under 12 hours at an average speed of 75mph. I have often considered taking the Tesla but it is by Tesla's route planner more like 16 hours and 765 miles taking the most direct slowest route to optimize charging in very good weather. That is 50 miles per hour on average. This is why I don't and would not take a Tesla on a long-distance trip.

    So let’s look at the numbers. 863 miles assuming every inch of it was at 75 MPH would take you 11 hours and 31 minutes and you can do the trip in less than 12, ok let’s say 11:59. That leaves you 28 minutes for 2 gas stops or 14 minutes each. Yup that is possible.

    So in the Tesla let’s also say 75 MPH and let’s leave a big margin and limit the range to 225 miles between charges. That’s 3 stops at 30 min. We will use your same route so the drive time is equal at 11:31, but the charge stops are 90 minutes vs your 28 minutes, so the Tesla is 62 minutes longer.

    Your ICE comes in at 12 hours and the Tesla is 13 hours. So yes Currently an ICE car will get long distances faster than an EV. Refueling is the advantage. The EVs advantage is cost. I suspect it’s roughly 1/2 the ICE cost.

    It’s slower but it’s a lot more fun.
  • I just love you guys. It never ceases to amaze me how far you will go with your outlandish total nonsense defenses of Tesla.
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