Model 3

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Tesla model 3 (New) RWD 2020 only gets around 110 miles or 190 km on full charge.

Hey,
Last december i bought a new M3 rwd from Tesla's inventory. And i tried everything but could not get more than 110miles of range. I have tried pre heating it (didt work for some range but it took around 9% of my battey).
My car is in constant chill mode. The A/C is set on a low temperture. I only use the seat heater. I dont go above 100km/h and my acceleration is normal. I get about 163 wh/km. So can some one tell me what am i doing wrong here? (And yes its around 2 degrees celcius where i live.)
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Comments

  • Odd. I have the P version, have cabin temp set to 70f, drive like I stole it, do lots of short trips and get over 200 miles. I will let others that do more analysis on their mileage in cold weather give you advice. The >200 miles I get is fine for my needs so I don't bother even checking that often. Don't even look at wh/km. On longer trips I get more mileage of course. My car is always garaged.
  • Driving Tips to Maximize Range
    You can maximize your driving range using the same driving habits you use to conserve fuel in a gasoline-powered vehicle. In addition to driving habits, energy consumption depends on environmental conditions (such as exceptionally cold or hot weather and driving on roads with steep hills).

    To achieve maximum range:
    • Slow down your driving and avoid frequent and rapid acceleration. Consider using Chill Mode (see Controls on page 136) and Speed Assist (see Speed Assist on page 134) to assist in controlling your acceleration and speed.
    • If safe to do so, modulate the accelerator pedal instead of using the brake pedal when gradually slowing down. Whenever Model 3 is moving and you are not pressing the accelerator pedal, regenerative braking slows down Model 3 and feeds surplus energy back to the Battery (see Regenerative Braking on page 69).
    • Set Stopping Mode to HOLD to gain the benefit of regenerative braking at low driving speeds (see Stopping Mode on page 70).
    • Keep tires at the recommended inflation pressures (see Tire Care and Maintenance on page 188), ensure tire alignment is within specification, and tires are rotated when needed. Rotating tires will reduce uneven tread wear, increasing your vehicle's efficiency (see Maintenance Schedule on page 186).
    • Lighten your load by removing any unnecessary cargo.
    • Fully raise all windows.
    • Limit the use of resources such as heating, lights, and air conditioning. Using seat heaters to keep warm is more efficient than heating the cabin using climate controls.
    • Precondition the vehicle while it is plugged in to ensure the cabin is at a comfortable temperature and windows are defrosted (if needed) before your drive. Use the mobile app to precondition your vehicle by touching Climate > Turn On Climate and customizing your preferences (see Mobile App on page 174).
    • Features such as Sentry Mode, Headlights After Exit, and Cabin Overheat Protection can impact range. Disable features that are not needed.
    • To prevent an excessive amount of energy consumption while the vehicle is idle, keep the vehicle plugged in when not in use.
    • Minimize the use of DC chargers (such as superchargers) for optimal Battery health. The power meter on the touchscreen and the Energy app (see Energy App on page 80) provides feedback on energy usage. With this feedback, you can become familiar with how driving habits and environmental conditions impact how much energy Model 3 is using.

    Factors Affecting Energy Consumption Several factors can affect your vehicle's rate of energy consumption, including:
    • Uphill travel: Driving uphill requires more energy and depletes range at a faster rate. However, driving downhill allows your vehicle to regain a portion of its expended energy through regenerative braking (see Regenerative Braking on page 69).
    • Customized settings: Energy is consumed by accessories like lights, heating and cooling, media player, Sentry Mode, etc.
    • Short trips: It takes energy to bring the cabin and Battery to a specified temperature when starting the vehicle. You may see a higher average consumption when the vehicle is used for very short trips while climate controls are enabled.
    • Temperature and weather conditions: In colder weather, precondition the vehicle before driving (see Cold Weather Best Practices on page 86).
  • > @NorthValley said:
    > Odd. I have the P version, have cabin temp set to 70f, drive like I stole it, do lots of short trips and get over 200 miles. I will let others that do more analysis on their mileage in cold weather give you advice. The >200 miles I get is fine for my needs so I don't bother even checking that often. Don't even look at wh/km. On longer trips I get more mileage of course. My car is always garaged.

    Thanks that would be great, 200 miles for me should also be great for my needs but i am not even coming close atm.
  • > @WW_Icefree said:
    > Driving Tips to Maximize Range
    > You can maximize your driving range using the same driving habits you use to conserve fuel in a gasoline-powered vehicle. In addition to driving habits, energy consumption depends on environmental conditions (such as exceptionally cold or hot weather and driving on roads with steep hills).
    >
    > To achieve maximum range:
    > • Slow down your driving and avoid frequent and rapid acceleration. Consider using Chill Mode (see Controls on page 136) and Speed Assist (see Speed Assist on page 134) to assist in controlling your acceleration and speed.
    > • If safe to do so, modulate the accelerator pedal instead of using the brake pedal when gradually slowing down. Whenever Model 3 is moving and you are not pressing the accelerator pedal, regenerative braking slows down Model 3 and feeds surplus energy back to the Battery (see Regenerative Braking on page 69).
    > • Set Stopping Mode to HOLD to gain the benefit of regenerative braking at low driving speeds (see Stopping Mode on page 70).
    > • Keep tires at the recommended inflation pressures (see Tire Care and Maintenance on page 188), ensure tire alignment is within specification, and tires are rotated when needed. Rotating tires will reduce uneven tread wear, increasing your vehicle's efficiency (see Maintenance Schedule on page 186).
    > • Lighten your load by removing any unnecessary cargo.
    > • Fully raise all windows.
    > • Limit the use of resources such as heating, lights, and air conditioning. Using seat heaters to keep warm is more efficient than heating the cabin using climate controls.
    > • Precondition the vehicle while it is plugged in to ensure the cabin is at a comfortable temperature and windows are defrosted (if needed) before your drive. Use the mobile app to precondition your vehicle by touching Climate > Turn On Climate and customizing your preferences (see Mobile App on page 174).
    > • Features such as Sentry Mode, Headlights After Exit, and Cabin Overheat Protection can impact range. Disable features that are not needed.
    > • To prevent an excessive amount of energy consumption while the vehicle is idle, keep the vehicle plugged in when not in use.
    > • Minimize the use of DC chargers (such as superchargers) for optimal Battery health. The power meter on the touchscreen and the Energy app (see Energy App on page 80) provides feedback on energy usage. With this feedback, you can become familiar with how driving habits and environmental conditions impact how much energy Model 3 is using.
    >
    > Factors Affecting Energy Consumption Several factors can affect your vehicle's rate of energy consumption, including:
    > • Uphill travel: Driving uphill requires more energy and depletes range at a faster rate. However, driving downhill allows your vehicle to regain a portion of its expended energy through regenerative braking (see Regenerative Braking on page 69).
    > • Customized settings: Energy is consumed by accessories like lights, heating and cooling, media player, Sentry Mode, etc.
    > • Short trips: It takes energy to bring the cabin and Battery to a specified temperature when starting the vehicle. You may see a higher average consumption when the vehicle is used for very short trips while climate controls are enabled.
    > • Temperature and weather conditions: In colder weather, precondition the vehicle before driving (see Cold Weather Best Practices on page 86).

    I have tried almost all of this but still doesnt even make an difference.
  • Service center visit and see what they tell you?
  • > @WW_Icefree said:
    > Service center visit and see what they tell you?

    Did call them and they said that they checked my battey and that there was nothing wrong with it. (Idk how but they checked it via wifi).
  • 110 mile is 177 km.
  • > @Sasteslaexperience said: > I have tried almost all of this but still doesnt even make an difference. "

    Tesla did a lot of software limiting on range and charging with the Model 3. You should make service appointment with Tesla to make sure there is no software lock on your car's range.
  • @Sasteslaexperience - Battery easy to check remotely for problems by Tesla. Works both by WiFi or Cellular. These are connected cars!

    Perhaps I missed it, but what model do you have and how many miles today? For example, the 3 SR is rated for 220 miles, when new, running at 65 mph, flat, 70F, zero wind, with 18" tires and rim inserts. Change any of these and you'll get fewer miles. Were your 110 miles from 100% SOC to 0% SOC? Few of us drive down to 0% SOC since you could be stranded, but it's no difference on how ICE cars are rated for range down to zero fuel remaining.
  • > @"TeslaTap.com" said:
    It was from 95% to 4%. Its the SR rwd. I get that 220 miles is almost unreachable but 200 to 190 miles isnt too much to wish for is it? (It also has the 19 inch wheels) ik that uses more but stil 110 miles max is a bit low.
  • > @FISHEV said:

    Wait, are u for real? If thats so i hope that is the problem.
  • > @Sasteslaexperience said:
    > > @FISHEV said:
    >
    > Wait, are u for real? If thats so i hope that is the problem.

    No he is not for real, FISHEV is a known Troll. Most of what he posts is wrong. Often, like in your case, deliberately wrong just to cause problems with Tesla. He may also be a short seller.
  • I agree with others, somehow get tesla to look into this further. I picked up my sr+ dec 21 and get Around 240 miles range. I cant believe any bad driving style could limit range that much. It has been around 35 F in winter here. I keep heat at 71 and seat heater on.
    Stampee
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > > @Sasteslaexperience said: > I have tried almost all of this but still doesnt even make an difference. "
    >
    > Tesla did a lot of software limiting on range and charging with the Model 3. You should make service appointment with Tesla to make sure there is no software lock on your car's range.
    >
    >

    Just outright lies.
  • > @Sasteslaexperience said:
    > Last december i bought a new M3 rwd from Tesla's inventory. And i tried everything but could not get more than 110miles of range. I have tried pre heating it (didt work for some range but it took around 9% of my battey).

    It sounds a bit like battery calibration. What are your charging habits? How do you charge? What percentage and how often? What temperatures are you driving in right now? Which M3 do you have? SR, SR+, LR, ect...
  • > @Sasteslaexperience said:
    > > @"TeslaTap.com" said:
    > It was from 95% to 4%. Its the SR rwd. I get that 220 miles is almost unreachable but 200 to 190 miles isnt too much to wish for is it? (It also has the 19 inch wheels) ik that uses more but stil 110 miles max is a bit low.

    Some additional questions:

    Is your 110 miles in a single drive, or is it over multiple drives with stops along the way? If multiple drives (even a single round trip), is Sentry Mode activated while parked?

    And yes, the 19" wheels are less efficient than the 18" tires. With that and considering the energy that would go to warming the battery at 2C, even with minimal heater usage, you can consider a 15-20% reduction (5% for the tires, 10-15% for cold temps). Also, when it's that cold, you don't have access to the full storage of the battery.
  • > @Sasteslaexperience said: > Wait, are u for real? If thats so i hope that is the problem."

    Early RWD models had larger battery but were software reduced range with lower price.

    Many who purchased 250 mile range never saw it as Tesla did not "reset" the software on the car. Yours is over a year old so that may be the issue.

    Look at the cars window sticker and see what the Rated Range is on the sticker. If 250 and you only see 190 at full charge for rated range, the software lock may be the problem though 30% range loss in winter is the norm but that doesn't show in Rated Range.
  • > @hokiegir1 said:

    The 110 miles is 2 trips of 31 miles and one of 50 miles so only parked the car three times. I disabled sentry mode already. But still, 0,85 x 190 ml = 161,5 and still we dont even come close to that
  • > @HAL2001
    I have the tesla model 3 SR+, i normally charge from 9% to around 90% i almost never charge to 100%

    I dont plug it in everyday, only if it gets close to 10% battery, because electrcity is pretty expensive on commercial charging stations.
  • > @Sasteslaexperience said:
    > > @hokiegir1 said:
    >
    > The 110 miles is 2 trips of 31 miles and one of 50 miles so only parked the car three times. I disabled sentry mode already. But still, 0,85 x 190 ml = 161,5 and still we dont even come close to that

    There are other losses while parked than Sentry mode -- that's jus the most common. There are traditional "vampire" losses, as they are generally referred to, that are a result of the car uploading/downloading data to the Tesla servers and also battery heating/cooling that takes place between trips. Additionally, your usage will be higher for individual trips as any warming that needs to occur will have to happen 3 different times.

    You haven't said what your wh/m or wh/km are, and I forgot to ask that earlier. I believe the SR is rated at 219 wh/m. I'm not exactly sure how that translates to km (or if that's how it's displayed where you are?).
  • > @Sasteslaexperience said:
    > > @FISHEV said:
    >
    > Wait, are u for real? If thats so i hope that is the problem.

    Fish is long time troll and lier. Don't believe what he says.
  • Thank you for clearing up that it was 3 separate drives. If you go for long trip without stops you will get very close to what Tesla advertises unless you are very inefficient driver.
  • Or driving uphill in the rain with head winds.
  • While speeding 80 miles per hour
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