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Electrify America's plan by 2028 is to have only 39 states covered.

Electrify America's plan by 2028 is to have only 39 states covered.

Check this out: https://www.electrifyamerica.com/our-plan

They only are going to have 39 states, and are going no further north than Boston for example.

So anyone who says that this network is a viable option for non Tesla EV owners needs to be corrected. I was on twitter yesterday conversing with a BMW fanatic who thinks the i4 is almost here and that Electrify America is fine for everyone. His response when told that it only will cover 39 states was that for him it was fine. Yup, that is a typical BMW owner.

....And that is what is promised by 2027. I doubt that it will happen.

jimglas | 2 July, 2019

shorter range, less performance, Less charging opportunities, more expensive
yup, I want the BMW

reed_lewis | 2 July, 2019

The guy on twitter posted this diatribe: https://twitter.com/ClarkDennisM/status/1145465995567386624

When I pointed out that it will be at least three years before the car is out, he does not care. When pointed out that the charging network is lacking, he does not care. Talk about blinders..

jordanrichard | 2 July, 2019

This really shouldn't come as a surprise. This whole network is basically court ordered. It was dictated that they spend "X" amount of money on it. I and others have been saying from the beginning that once they meet they minimum requirement of the settlement, they will stop. Many praise this network, like they praise the EV efforts of GM and such, but like many I see it as a hindrance. Half ass produced EVs and a half ass charging network will only further the stigma that EVs are limited cars and clearly are not suitable replacements for one's ICE car. The only upside with this is that Tesla will sell more cars because they and the supercharger network will just stand out even further.

jimglas | 2 July, 2019

Are there any funds set aside for upkeep of the network?

reed_lewis | 2 July, 2019

If you look at the picture on the webpage posted by myself, they do not plan to go into Maine, NH, and Vermont. That is a large chunk of real estate that they are skipping. Meanwhile Tesla is expanding out there.

Pricee2 | 2 July, 2019

I stopped to check out the diesel gate chargers at the Walmart in South Everett this morning and per the info placards on the chargers they are all 50kW. Their web site says they are 350, 125 and 75kW. I am often on my way before I get to down a 50kW rate of charge.

Mike83 | 2 July, 2019

Don't trust this plan. Money wasted IMHO. VW and other fossil fuel interests prefer selling ICE vehicles and make EVs look bad. Didn't the VW guys to to Jail. They need to make amends.
The money should have gone to people having to breathe diesel crap and their doctor bills.

SamO | 2 July, 2019

No. Surprise

Many here have predicted that VW was full of shit and would slow roll this.

Nostra-fucking-damuses.

TeslaTap.com | 2 July, 2019

I thought the original plan was to have it fully built out with 300+ 350 kW chargers across the USA by June 2019. Look like those plans are standard vaporware, like a lot of EVs!

rxlawdude | 3 July, 2019

@TTap, you think the legacy automakers are starting to realize they have to throw in the towel, or actually need to create a VIABLE and RELIABLE DCFC network?

Earl and Nagin ... | 3 July, 2019

@rxlaw,
I think they very well know that they don't have to worry about competition to their ICE sales because nobody is creating a viable and reliable DCFC network. What they hate is that Tesla is creating one.

Tesla-David | 3 July, 2019

Interesting to read this and understand why Tesla clearly has the lead and will continue to with their rapidly expanding and now upgraded SC3 grid. GO TESLA!

dmm1240 | 4 July, 2019

I'm struck by the parallel with rural electrification in the early decades of the 20th century. Power utilities were quick to jump on bringing electricity to cities and decent sized towns; rural communities not so much. By 1930, we had two Americas, one with electric lights and one still using oil lamps. Power companies refused to string wires to small communities saying it was a money loser. Enter the REA (Rural Electrification Agency) as part of the New Deal. The government ran the lines and 99% of America gained access to electricity.

Eventually, we'll have to have a similar type of effort for states like North Dakota with lots of land and not so many people in terms of EV charging stations. State and local governments should be able to handle it, it's not that expensive, but I think the feds will have to get involved some as well.

What I'd like to see is for states to install several EV chargers at rest stops on interstates. Put in A Tesla charger or two, some of the others. Lease 'em out to the various companies with the state taking a cut, too.

NKYTA | 4 July, 2019

I know a guy that can speak to :

“Power utilities were quick to jump on bringing electricity to cities and decent sized towns; rural communities not so much. By 1930, we had two Americas, one with electric lights and one still using oil lamps.”

...as far as telephony...

It’s an interesting read.

NKYTA | 4 July, 2019

Different era, by 30+ years, but probably a similar story.

Tesla2018 | 6 July, 2019

Wish they would make VW put free chargers at all of their dealerships that anyone could use as part of the settlement.

I got lucky a few years ago since Pep Boys were selling cheap minibikes and go karts with Chinese engines that violated pollution regulations. Part of the settlement was that they had to give discounts on electric lawnmovers so I was able to get rid of my 25 year old gas powered one that poured out black smoke. The battery pack isnt made any more but it is just 12v jetski batteries mounted in series or parallel inside of a case to product more voltage. So for $80 every 5 years I can rebuild the battery pack. Less than what I pay for gas and I dont have to run to the gas station and fill up 5 gallon cans and worry about them spilling inside the car.

jordanrichard | 6 July, 2019

Tesla2018, VW dealerships are not owned by VW and nor are they ones that put in the software to cheat the emissions testing.

jbyanda2016 | 6 July, 2019

Enter the REA (Rural Electrification Agency) as part of the New Deal. The government ran the lines and 99% of America gained access to electricity.
Yeap that changed everything. Stood at the top of sand road to our great grand parents farm house / late 1940's. REA was putting in 6 poles up the road to the house. We got electricity. As we watched the workmen, my great-grandfather put his hand on my head, looked down at me and said, "Everything will change now". And it did. Zip on to right-now. Fred Trumpf's kid is in charge so get used to it. Yes I'm older and I can call him a kid. He listened to the Rev. Norman Vincent Peal it NYCs downtown prod/church. The curly haired kid from the dazzle-rich-TV-church paraphrases the Rev.-NVP - he's a cute one and has a lease on a lil jet aero-plane too.. And the kid down the street bought and wears his mega hat. He going to career in fast food service. GED is all he has. His dad is really really sad. We need some of the good-old-days with red quarantine signs on the front doors of homes, TB sanitoriums and people consumed by that un known disease 'consumption'. Grandma was scared of IT and couldn't say the "C" word when her next door neighbor was in the hospital. My dad almost couldn't go into the city catholic hospital to visit his cousin on his death bed. Well, in truth he did; but is was a 5 minute trip as we left for the bar 'to talk'. OK my quarter-rank to over maybe more later in a proper forum.

rxlawdude | 6 July, 2019

@jbyanda, please (a) use paragraphs, (b) don't rant in so many directions that you sound schizophrenic, and (c) learn English.

Roger1 | 7 July, 2019

Electrify America and other companies will deploy the CCS connector and charging standard. Owners of vehicles with a CCS connector will be able to buy power from any CCS station. The charger coverage map for CCS cars will be the combined area of all the different networks. Competition between network operators will drive down prices. Broad coverage and density of charging sites will be marketable advantages for network operators.
Tesla offers a replacement power board for European model S and X cars to allow them to charge from CCS stations. The replacement board comes with a plug adaptor from CCS to European Tesla connector. In Canada, we will need a similar upgrade to use CCS charging stations in places where Tesla Superchargers will not be available in the near future. Unlike the US where the administration has dropped out of the Paris agreement, the Canadian federal government remains committed to reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Some funding is provided for charging stations which will help expand coverage. I expect these stations will all have CCS and CHADEMO connectors.

Tropopause | 7 July, 2019

Name should be changed to "Electrify SOME of America".

NoMoPetrol | 7 July, 2019

@jbyanda
(d) plan to make a point at the end of your post. Then make that point.

rxlawdude | 7 July, 2019

@Roger, they will never be priced anywhere near the net cost of electricity. Everything I've read suggests these DCFC newcomers are charging the equivalent of $.30-.80/kWh.

Earl and Nagin ... | 7 July, 2019

@Roger1,
I took the old Leaf out for a ride today. I fast charged at a Walmart on an EVgo station. It cost me $5.40 for 4.2 kWh of electricity. You do the math and tell me how well your plan is going to drop prices.
The only reason Tesla is using CCS is because the EU prohibits Superchargers. If they wanted competition, they'd allow Tesla to compete.

andy.connor.e | 8 July, 2019

Gotta generate your own electricity.

Roger1 | 8 July, 2019

@rxlawdude, when charging stations are as closely spaced as gas stations the effects of competition will appear, but all cars will need the capability to charge from any station to make this happen.
@Earl and Nagin, the EU wants all charging infrastructure available to all electric vehicles as far as I can tell. Tesla can build all the Superchargers it wants as long as they provide some CCS charging stalls. Tesla customers also want to be able to charge their cars at the non-Tesla charging locations which will outnumber Tesla SC facilities. Tesla puts CCS connectors on the Model 3 for this reason. I expect the upcoming model S/X revamp will include a CCS connector for European markets. The current production S and X with new electronics should be compatible with CCS and only require a physical adaptor. From the customer perspective, one type of charger connection that works everywhere makes sense.

Earl and Nagin ... | 8 July, 2019

@Roger1,
Like all ham-fisted, totalitarian socialist schemes: the approach you describe (which is true) rewards the non-contributers and penalizes those who put effort into making things better like Tesla has.
Its good that Europe finally got on board with EVs but they should be very thankful for the US's capitalistic approach that actually created viable EVs for mankind. It was Tesla, and, to a lesser extent, Renault/Nissan (driven by Israeli capitalists) that broke the lock that the European oil industry's diesel facade had on their EU cronies.
While I'm sure Tesla will succeed because America lets them make money, forcing Tesla to subsidize those who did not help (and even fought them) strikes me as being highly unfair.

SO | 8 July, 2019

@Earl - “While I'm sure Tesla will succeed because America lets them make money, forcing Tesla to subsidize those who did not help (and even fought them) strikes me as being highly unfair.”

Exactly. Just like with the tax credits in the US. They should be date sensitive, not production sensitive. Tesla did all the hard work to prove that EVs can be awesome. They should reap the most benefit for the hard work. Let all manufacturers have the tax credit until 2025. After that, end it and in turn start taxing gas vehicle sales higher.

Earl and Nagin ... | 8 July, 2019

@SO,
Alternately, the subsidy should have dropped for all manufacturers just as they did for the leaders since, obviously, the subsidy was sufficient for a manufacturer to come up with a viable EV solution.
However, I suspect that the administration passing the subsidy assumed the technology wouldn't work.

reed_lewis | 9 July, 2019

greatvalue is SPAM. Please flag!

jimglas | 9 July, 2019

flagged 959