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Spare Parts for a Tesla

Spare Parts for a Tesla

The other day when parking my MS I accidentally hit concrete curbing in a parking lot with the lower right corner of the front bumper cover. Luckily the clear bra suffered most of the damage, so once I touched up a small paint chip, I had new bra material installed and all is good, EXCEPT:

A very small plastic bracket on the unpainted side of the front bumper cover had its mounting tab broken. It looks like a $15 part but who knows what it really costs. However I was unable to find a way to buy spare parts from Tesla so I eventually bought a used one on eBay. Turns out when I got it, it looked brand new. However the question remains how does one buy parts from Tesla? I am pretty skilled repairing and painting car parts (I built and painted a show quality airplane), so if for example a side view mirror shell was broken how would I go about buying a replacement for me to paint and install? I have never encountered a car manufacturer that would not sell most any spare part to a consumer.

Thanks

TeslaTap.com | 10 January, 2020

Go to the Tesla parts catalog, which has diagrams to help locate a part, and then buy/order at any service center. I've done it a number of times - really easy. Many parts are in stock, but if not, they order it and let you know when it arrives. Longest I had to wait was 7 days, but in most cases, they had the part I needed. Prices were reasonable too, compared legacy automaker dealers.

https://epc.tesla.com/?_ga=2.33348798.1266662604.1540656897-20260775.149...

flickroll | 10 January, 2020

Thank you!

TeslaTap.com | 10 January, 2020

I've also found some used/new eBay parts are as expensive or even more expensive than Tesla's new parts. It pays to check. I've found that Tesla has reduced parts costs over time. Some parts are now 1/2 the cost they were when producing much lower volumes. What car company reduces parts costs :)

Some parts are restricted, so you can't buy them from Tesla. For example, you can't buy a battery pack. It sort of makes sense, as you need a special fixture to remove it, it could crush you if removed improperly, and it could electrocute you with the high-voltages involved. Tesla only wants trained personal to deal with this.