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Battery Range

Battery Range

Hello,

I have a 2019 Model 3 Dual Motor. I've recently tested charging the battery to the max, adjusting to full trip setting, to see what the batter range would say. I've never gotten it to charge beyond 298. I think the car is advertised as having a range 322?

Is this normal? What is the max some of you get when charging yours in full Trip mode?

I've started thinking, maybe it incorporates your driving habits into the average? Or maybe something is wrong with my battery?

FISHED | 26 May, 2020

You are correct that the range shown is affected by charging habits, weather, driving habits, etc. I would highly suggest switching your display to %.

stingray.don | 26 May, 2020

The battery meter range is just an estimate that is influenced by external factors such as temperature. It is also subject to calibration and extrapolation errors. It is not an indicator of battery health.

https://www.tesla.com/support/range

M-A-B-MCMLXXX | 26 May, 2020

No, it does not reflect driving habits, and there is likely nothing wrong with your battery.

Note: the guessometer is subject to calibration errors, and fluctuates.

https://www.tesla.com/support/range

M-A-B-MCMLXXX | 26 May, 2020

quick draw don won that one! haha

stingray.don | 26 May, 2020

One additional note, the 2019 model 3 LR had a rated range of 310 miles. The 322 mile range applies to the 2020 model. Although I don’t know of any difference between the model years that would affect the range, and I suspect they are the same.

bjrosen | 26 May, 2020

There is a free app called TezLab that you might find useful, it display both your level and your guess-o-meter range. Today it's warm so I'm seeing an effective range above the advertised 310, i.e. 238 miles @75% which translates to 317 @ 100%. I don't think that the 323 number that they are claiming now applies to 2019s. In Sandy Munro's teardown of the Model Y he found that the rotor in the motor has changed, it's lighter now which could account for the increase from 310 to 323. Tesla never explained how they increased the range from 310 to 323, we speculated that it was a software improvement but my guess is that it's due to the motor tweaks.

FISHED | 26 May, 2020

WTB edit button so I could pretend I answered that right.

rovo.dean | 26 May, 2020

So if the range is not based on driving habits, the only other thing that seems would have an impact on that number is weather?

even if the 320 number doesn't apply to a 2019 model, shouldn't my model at least show above 300? Close to ~305+?

The temperature here today is 75°F. Do you think that is cold enough to impact my battery?

rovo.dean | 26 May, 2020

...and thanks for the all the insight! really enjoyed reading all the comments.

stingray.don | 26 May, 2020

rovo.dean,

Weather is not the only factor. Some battery degradation is normal and should be expected. Additionally, the battery meter range estimate can experience calibration errors particularly when using short charging cycles. Bottom line is that the battery meter range lacks a high level of precision and accuracy. State of charge is more difficult to calculate precisely compared fuel level. Don’t read too much into small discrepancies. If there is an issue with your battery, the car will notify you.

AmokTime | 26 May, 2020

Here’s a good example of how variable those figures are. Yesterday I started out with 85 miles on the guessometer and 92 miles on the energy graph’s projected range. I drove a 35-mile round trip to pick up groceries. I forgot to make a note of the guessometer range when I arrived home, but my energy graph projected range actually increased to 96 miles. My trip was at 76F, traveling mostly at 60mph on a state highway. My Wh/mi was 166 over the final 30 miles of the trip. The guessometer is a combination of a guess as to total range plus a steady decrement based on an assumed Wh/mi value. The projected range is a better value, but is influenced by weather, elevation change, and driving style.

Another trip I took recently was mostly along I-95. The trip (one-way) was 66 miles, but it used only 52 miles of guessometer range. My 132-mile round trip used only about 104 guessometer miles at 60F and driving 55. At 95% charge before I departed, the guessometer read 216 miles. That makes my true range look like 288 miles, while the guessometer would have shown only about 227 at 100%, an apparent deficit of 13 miles vs. the original rating. The reality is that my true range is somewhere between 227 and 288 depending on how heavy I am on the accelerator.

TeslaTap.com | 26 May, 2020

The range accuracy issue comes up every week now. I wrote an entire article to explain why it can be inaccurate, how to make it a bit more accurate and help understand battery degradation: https://teslatap.com/articles/range-university/

AmokTime | 26 May, 2020

Maybe they should pin the range topic. Can they do that on this board?

Tronguy | 26 May, 2020

@AmokTime: There's exactly one (1) pinned article, and it's the one at the top, originally put there by Tesla. Telsa does very, very little in terms of moderation or much else; hence, the existence of the troll brigade (Fish, Tanya, Howard, etc.) who hang around here.
I concur about the battery range. I have a M3 LR from 2018. These days, at 90% charge, it states that it can go 283 miles, which implies that it has a full range of 314 or so. But at the beginning of a longish trip last summer its 90% charge level was 279; after a couple of long hauls and supercharger runs, that was up to 291; after getting back home, the 90% level was 285, slowly decaying over time. Those three numbers correspond to "full" values of 310, 323, and 316. In reality, the battery likely hasn't degraded at all, it's just the guess-o-meter doing its thing.
We had a service technician come by to fix a minor problem with the car a month or so ago. He, out of the blue, volunteered that not charging the car until it got down to like, 60 miles of range, then charging it back up would give a better (well, probably just higher) range estimate. I'm guessing that the poor guy gets a lot of questions like this, it's not just the forum :).

fazman | 26 May, 2020

@OP, that battery gauge you see really not accurate at all. I have come to realize that this is more of a placebo gauge if anything. Percent gauge might be the best way to use it.

If you want to track the mileage actually driven, use the built in “trip meter cards”. If you want a battery gauge, you have 6 different ways to look at how your range is doing (Energy in the menu and you have 5 mile/15 mile/30 mile and instant/average). When you look at the center of the graph thats the mythical solid line you need to maintain to get the rated Wh/mi rated epa distance. The more realistic rating of range would be the 30 mile and Average selections and look at the far right of the graph for the “realistic range” you could do.

Case in point... I have a 2018 P3D+ with PUP and stock 20” rims. My car is EPA rated for 310 miles on 100% battery ( 73 kwh battery). Real world extreme driving of all freeway, no HVAC, covid lockdown empty freeway during the day time @ 50 mph from the Salinas, CA Supercharger to the Oxnard, CA Supercharger, while BEATING the rated line of 250 Wh/mi
... still required me to do multiple supercharging stops (San Louis Obispo, CA /Madonna Inn with a yellow battery) and doing about 3.7 miles average driven per 1 kwh of battery used.

My total drive to my destination was 280 actual miles (Door to Door) and I used 78 kwh of battery. I also pissed off a lot of 18 wheelers on the 101 South freeway doing 50 mph.

fazman | 26 May, 2020

I have been able to achieve 4 miles driven per 1 kwh of battery used while driving @ 65 mph from Salinas, CA to Palo Alto (Stanford University) and back to Salinas, CA on one full charge (Covid lock down freeway way traffic during the day @ the speed limit using NoA on chill mode, no HVAC, temps about 70°F tires at 45 psi all around, windows rolled up, and and empty car for the entire trip).

But that was only for part of the trip I averaged 4 miles per 1 KWH... at the end of the day when I did the full calc from beginning to end of the trip using the card for “Last Charged” I had averaged 3.7 miles per 1 Kwh of battery used.

fazman | 26 May, 2020

@AmokTime - That would be an awesome idea to have a forum sticky at the top for “range”. It would have helped me a lot in my first year of ownership as I struggled (and still struggle) to understand what is “normal/expected” range in my P3D+ PUP car. From seeing other youtube tesla videos... its seems most are getting in the 300+ Wh/mi range for my spec’ed car... so I know I am driving it correctly if I can maintain and sometimes beat the rated line of 250 Wh/mi but can’t achieve more than 240 usable real world miles. The only way I can achieve a better Wh/mi in my car is when I do ALL local driving under 45 MPH for about 15 miles round trip (7.5 miles each way). When I do, that I have been able to hit like 220 Wh/mi. I’m convinced the only way to get the 310 actual EPA rated miles on this P3D+ PUP would be to drive on a flat road at 70°F temp doing 35 MPH with no traffic (I don’t think I have the patience to do that much testing).