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Living in apartment and owing Tesla

Living in apartment and owing Tesla

We live in apartment and so far does not owe any house in US. Please suggest as to how can we charge the car at night? Does it have any provision of installing charging system in apartment unit with long cables till parking? Any insight is appreciated. Thanks.

mcchen | 27 July, 2017

When I lived in an apartment, I charged my car at the local train station or city hall. They had free charging overnight, but I had to wake up early and remove my car before they towed or ticketed for parking too long.

JeffreyR | 27 July, 2017

Use Chrome and search. Or go to OMC/FAQ in Model S section.
https://forums.tesla.com/forum/forums/tesla-forum-enhancement-suite-tfes...

eeb9 | 28 July, 2017

First, ask your apartment management if they'd be willing to install chargers. More and more of them are doing so.

Second, download and use the PlugShare app to find chargers close to where you live or work

More chargers are popping up every day...

When I moved recently, I made charger availability a make or break criteria, and I was quite vocal about it when I spoke to managers and leasing agents. I ended up at a complex that not only has chargers...but they are FREE for residents.

Look around and you might be surprised at what you find

andy.connor.e | 28 July, 2017

There are charging companies that you can issue an inquiry with, where the company will contact your apartment complex about possibly installing some stations on premises.

Or, another suggestion would be to figure out how to manage charging without relying on doing it overnight. Is there somewhere you can park while at work? Can you get a few bits and pieces during errands? Dont just put everything into one expectation of having a "charge overnight option". You can make it work.

carlk | 28 July, 2017

If you have a designated parking space you certainly can install a 220V outlet or a HPWC. The other solution is to ask your employer to install the outlet so you can charge at work and use superchargers or other destination chargers in days you don't go to work.

Wilber | 28 July, 2017

As part of the supercharger expansion plans for this year Tesla is building urban supercharging locations. One of the main purposes of these will be to serve renters. I plan to sell my house, but stay in the area. Luckily Tesla is building two new supercharging locations in my area. Take a look at the supercharging map on the Tesla website to see if there will be superchargers near you soon.

dgonch | 28 July, 2017

I would first contact your landlord to see if he or she would allow you to install a charger. If they say no, I would then check local laws to see if you can install one anyway without their permission. For example, in California, you can install a Level 2 charger after 60 days of requesting permission from your landlord if the building is not rent-controlled and there are more than a minimum number of parking spots (I think either 6 or 10 or something like that). Lastly, check with your local utility. They might be providing rebates for EVSE installation. For example, LADWP gives you back $500 which covers about half the cost of the charger plus installation. Good luck!

jordanrichard | 28 July, 2017

Wilber +1

MMHouston | 28 July, 2017

My apartment building has a Level 2 charger installed. It was a pay charger at first, but now it's free. Unless you live across the street from a public charger, I would make sure to live in apartment building or complex with a charger. My Model S takes up to 12 hours to fully charge on a Level 2, so you need it close by.

CraigW | 28 July, 2017

Apartment people -- the Model 3 75 is likely to have a range over 300 miles. This may be the way to go, then you can make a once/week trip to a supercharger.

mrquanhoangnguyen | 1 May, 2019

If anyone is still reading this post to find a solution, here is the solution for you. There is a company called Quick220 made a box to combine two 110V outlets into one 220V with 15amp or 20amp outlet. Read the Youtube video, and the link for that company is below.

https://youtu.be/BEyOZ842Tzs

https://www.quick220.com/blog/electric-car-charging-everything-you-need-...

jithesh | 2 May, 2019

+1 @dgonch

you need to start with your landlord.

I asked mine they politely declined saying there is not much demand in the community. But then I found other ways to charge mine. I don't drive to work so less miles. I just charge for free it in nearby Train station when the charge drops below 40%. It works so well with my office commute that I am not pursuing my apartment anymore. Occasionally I use supercharger also.

If you drive to work ask your employer.

mr.mark.tarver | 2 May, 2019

O own a model 3 Dual Motor performance. I live in a town home in Brooklyn, NY the nearest supercharger is at the Brooklyn Museum and the is another one in Williamsburg Brooklyn in a very high end hotel. I charge the Car every third to 3rd or 4th day. I drive about 56 miles a day Monday-Friday. Maybe another 25-35 over the weekend. So owning a Tesla without having a driveway or garage isn't impossible. You just have to Change the way you fuel up. In NYC You have to pay to park at the super chargers and they vary Greatly Museum 9 bucks over an hour. Williamsburg runs me about 11 bucks. If You go to the theater district they charge a whopping 48 Bucks. A Charge usually takes 45 to 1:30 Minutes Depending on how much I want to charge the battery. I usually get to 200 + Miles within 35-45 minutes. Once it gets over 200 it charges considerable slower. The Key thing I do is do something while I'm charging. Take the wife out for dinner and drinks- Hit the Cafe's go shopping. Etc. Superchargers are usually located near stuff like restaurants malls, Etc. So its not as convenient as fueling with gas, But I've adjusted my lifestyle and its actually not inconvenient. Its just a change in when and how I fuel my vehicle.

mr.mark.tarver | 2 May, 2019

O own a model 3 Dual Motor performance. I live in a town home in Brooklyn, NY the nearest supercharger is at the Brooklyn Museum and the is another one in Williamsburg Brooklyn in a very high end hotel. I charge the Car every third to 3rd or 4th day. I drive about 56 miles a day Monday-Friday. Maybe another 25-35 over the weekend. So owning a Tesla without having a driveway or garage isn't impossible. You just have to Change the way you fuel up. In NYC You have to pay to park at the super chargers and they vary Greatly Museum 9 bucks over an hour. Williamsburg runs me about 11 bucks. If You go to the theater district they charge a whopping 48 Bucks. A Charge usually takes 45 to 1:30 Minutes Depending on how much I want to charge the battery. I usually get to 200 + Miles within 35-45 minutes. Once it gets over 200 it charges considerable slower. The Key thing I do is do something while I'm charging. Take the wife out for dinner and drinks- Hit the Cafe's go shopping. Etc. Superchargers are usually located near stuff like restaurants malls, Etc. So its not as convenient as fueling with gas, But I've adjusted my lifestyle and its actually not inconvenient. Its just a change in when and how I fuel my vehicle.

michiels.evan | 19 September, 2019

Check out my video on youtube about this issue...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7GyJH7-gfE

Demixl | 20 March, 2020

I live in a Los Angeles apartment and have a model 3 reserved. I'm not worried about it. Given my normal driving, I'll only need to charge once a week. Superchargers, municipal chargers including grocery stores and city ones, or worst case running an extension cord to my carport. Eventually I'll probably install my own charger, which the landlord has already approved.

FISHEV | 20 March, 2020
syclone | 20 March, 2020

We spend most of the winter in Florida near Ft Lauderdale. I have no means to charge at our Weston residence. There are 2 supercharger locations within 10 miles, however. It's a nice break driving to one of the superchargers once or twice a week and having breakfast for 50 - 55 minutes while the car also has breakfast.

FISHEV | 20 March, 2020

Here's how it's done with no home charging. 20,000 miles so far and working.

1. Have Tesla superchargers in strategic locations. I have them near work, near house and half way between my 50 mile one way work commute.

2. Get the Chademo adapter so you can use the 1,000's of 50kW/200mph public networks chargers, a lifesaver.

3. Go for fast 20-30 minute charges and be prepared in cold weather to charge every day.

4. Strategic charging. On way home, charge while rush hour dies down. Go big, bring dinner from work, charge to 85%. Know when there's a crowd. All my SCs are high usage which means, lines, low charge rates, avoid that by good timing.

Magic 8 Ball | 20 March, 2020

@FISHEV Have you applied for your Ford deposit refund yet? I here they are making golden parachutes out of that deposit money.

Magic 8 Ball | 20 March, 2020

I here = I hear

Xerogas | 20 March, 2020

Hear, hear

spuzzz123 | 20 March, 2020

You don’t need a chademo adaptor and you won’t have to supercharge every day. Fish is trying to scare buyers off who are on the fence and nervous about it. Fish maintains the lie that the government won’t allow him to use electricity. You could absolutely get by on a 115v if you drive 50 miles a day. If you drive more than that you can supercharge fillup periodically and make it really stretch with 115v snacks.

Lonestar10_1999 | 20 March, 2020

@melissaash648- If you’re looking for advice, you may want to tell your boyfriend that he should sign up for anger management because he gets pissed off easily and it frightens you. Give him an ultimatum that if he doesn’t change his abusive ways, you will drive off in your new awesome M3 and never return.

Tronguy | 20 March, 2020

@melissaash648: So, here's the non-snark answers.
Look: At some point you took Driver's Ed before you got your license to drive. The care and feeding of Internal Combustion Engine-based cars is actually a fairly hairy topic: Oil changes, fluid checks, when to put dry gas in the tank, and all that jazz. You learned all that stuff back then and don't think about it now, because it's all been internalized. So: the good news: Electric cars are, by far, simpler. The bad news: They are, unavoidably, different. So, there's going to be a bit of a learning curve. It's not huge, but it is there.
Next: There Is A Manual. It's in the car on the touchscreen (Hit the "T" symbol at the top and navigate from there). However, if I were you, I'd log onto your account at Tesla (you have to have one of these, otherwise the key wouldn't be working). Click on the "Manage" button on your account and a link to the manual for your particular car will be Right There on the bottom right. Download the PDF; maybe print it out, but spend an evening or three reading through it. A lot of running around in a Tesla isn't much different than running around in an ICE car, but there are differences; and, when you're driving a hurtling ton-and-a-half-or-so car down the road, knowing those differences can make a difference between life and death, capish?
As far as charging and all: It's a battery based car. The typical long-range and performance variants of the M3 have a 75 kW-hr battery. Just so we're clear: That battery can put out, roughly, 75 kilowatts of power for one hour, 7.5 kW of power for ten hours, 0.75 kW of power for 100 hours, and so on. The efficiency, that is, how much energy per mile, is, for the long-range variant, 75 kW-hr/322 miles = 233 Watt-Hours/mile.
If you have the SR+ variant, with a range of 250 miles, it's got the same efficiency, but a smaller battery.
You next asked: How often do I have to charge this beast?
OK. You're in England. The adapters are different on this side of the pond. In the U.S., the very standard household wiring is typically set up for 120 VAC, as compared to the UK's more standard 220 VAC. Typical maximum current for a U.S. wall socket is 12A; so, 120 VAC * 12A = 1.44 kW. So, suppose I went 30 miles in a given day. At 233 W-hr/mile, that would mean that, that day, I used 30*233 = 6.99 kW-hr. So, if I plugged my car into a wall socket and started charging at 1.44 kW, the time it would take to charge the car back up again would be 6.99 kW-hr/1.44 kW = 4.85 hours; or about 5 hours.
Seeing as you're in the UK, with 220 VAC; well, I don't know what the standard adapter that comes with the car does, but I'd guess that you'd be charging at double the wattage I'd get, so, it'd take you roughly 2.5 hours to charge up. So, what adapter came in the trunk? Answer that, we'll give better answers.
Next: There are superchargers. These are systems that can charge at a rate, up to, 300 miles of charge per hour. So, in principle, 30 miles of charge would take well less than 15 minutes or so.
So.. Instead of charging up every day by plugging into a wall socket (probably the cheapest method, wall socket electricity is about half the cost of supercharger electricity), you wait three or four days, stop by a supercharger for a half hour or so, and be on your way.
So: What kind of M3 you got? And what do the adapters look like?

spuzzz123 | 20 March, 2020

Tron and lone star are you really giving advice to a spammer?

Tronguy | 20 March, 2020

@spuzzz123: Well, melissa sounded a bit like a frustrated user, so why not? But I note that her post is gone, so people must of flagged it. Has she been running around doing that post over and over?

spuzzz123 | 20 March, 2020

At the end of her post she linked to an ad. It’s a recent tactic on these forums...post something vaguely related to the op then plop the spam link.

yudansha™ | 20 March, 2020

@spuzzz123 Now you see why I announce my flagging. People don't always realize it is spam, waste their time on explaining things, possibly clicking those links and getting virus.

Tronguy | 20 March, 2020

@spuzzz123: Right, missed it, I'll keep an eye open for the next one, so, thanks.
But, weird: I thought that "verified owners" were the only ones who could post. Guess that's changed if the spammers are about, or there's a known hack to post around here.
Might explain FISH & the sock-puppets, though, if true.

FISHEV | 20 March, 2020

"You don’t need a chademo adaptor and you won’t have to supercharge every day."

Depends on your driving needs.

"Fish is trying to scare buyers off who are on the fence and nervous about it."

I would think real world example of high mileage, long commutes (105 mile round trip) and no home charging does the opposite. It shows people that it can be done and how to do it. Experience and facts.

lbowroom | 20 March, 2020

Fish, but you said you have charging capability at home now. Are you not one of the 3 of 6 that opted in?

WW_spb | 20 March, 2020

He can't remember Covid got his lil Brain

spuzzz123 | 20 March, 2020

I probably wouldn’t advise anyone with a 105 mile round trip and no home charging (not even level 1) to buy any EV. Only a moron would do so.

FISHEV | 20 March, 2020

"I probably wouldn’t advise anyone with a 105 mile round trip and no home charging (not even level 1) to buy any EV."

Then leave it to those of us who do it successfully to tell people how it is done and the issues and they can decide if that works for them.k

It works well for me at the extreme and it could for others or it might not but if they know the facts, they can make intelligent decision. It's a no brainer.

andy.connor.e | 20 March, 2020

spam is very easy to spot.

spuzzz123 | 21 March, 2020

“weird: I thought that "verified owners" were the only ones who could post. ” only verified owners can start a new thread. Anyone with an email account can respond to existing threads. And it is suspected that it is fairly easy to obtain owners rights, which explains a handful of crafty trolls with owner privileges. Speaking of which....

@fish you don’t do it successfully even in your fictional world! Whine and moan about not enough chargers, insufficient range, battery conditioning, etc. Your entire phony narrative is predicated on a failed ownership experience because you can’t charge at home or work.

WW_spb | 21 March, 2020

Or he can but continues pretend the opposite

FISHEV | 21 March, 2020

"Your entire phony narrative is predicated on a failed ownership experience because you can’t charge at home or work."

I'd say I've got one of the most successful EV ownerships, making it work at the extremes with long commutes and no home charging. Strong work.

Difference between actually doing it vs. the arm chair EV'ers who have no experience with this topic but tell people to do it or not based on...hmm...well nothing.

Magic 8 Ball | 21 March, 2020

FISHEV is EVIL with his anti Tesla narrative and propaganda.

WW_spb | 21 March, 2020

You forgot to mention it was possible to do it thanks to model 3 range bc any other EV available right wouldn't work for your situation.

WW_spb | 21 March, 2020

Right now*

FISHEV | 21 March, 2020

"You forgot to mention it was possible to do it thanks to model 3 range bc any other EV available right wouldn't work for your situation."

Kona EV is available and could do it for less money right now. I'd recommend that for an apartment dweller without home charging as a better city car than the bigger Model 3 and easier in parking garage and other reasons. Key there, as with the Tesla, is locating your charging options. For the CCS port equipped Kona, look at the Electrify America map, visit the sites to see if they'd work for you. Be sure to look at sites that EA shows as "Coming Soon", many of them are installed already.

https://www.electrifyamerica.com/locate-charger?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIw_XF1e...

https://imgur.com/EiIKWaj

If found these two as "Future" but ready to open.

https://imgur.com/NzIzoG9

https://imgur.com/D2oOOaw

WW_spb | 21 March, 2020

Tough luck you don't have Kona, huh?

WW_spb | 21 March, 2020

And Kona still have less range

FISHEV | 21 March, 2020

"And Kona still have less range"

Interesting question. Kona EV is rated 258 miles vs. LR AWD 310 miles (mine).

As you saw in the comparison Winter driving tests Kona EV was 9% less than rated while Model 3 was 24% less than rated.

258 x .90 = 232 miles.
310 x .76 = 235 miles.

Also for apartment dweller, the chance of complex adding chargers with the industry standard CCS adapter are higher than for Tesla adapters.

And cost. $46k-$7,500-$2,500 = $36k

Going lowest cost Tesla at 250 miles at $40k-$2,500 = $37.5k

I think many new to EV's would find the Kona's a better "car" regarding controls etc, has the hatchback, has FWD vs. RWD. More conventional might be a better term. Owner can be more focused on learning EV and not operations.

FISHEV | 21 March, 2020

But real issue with no home charger is lining up the fast charging network and matching your miles to the network, deducting 25% for Winter driving. Allocating the time to charge.

Lonestar10_1999 | 21 March, 2020

Why tell us about Kona EV when we already purchased and are enjoying our M3s. How brainless are you?

Magic 8 Ball | 21 March, 2020

FISHEV is an EVIL hypocrite. Tells others they should only talk Model 3 here and he carries on his EVIL agenda to bash Tesla and Tesla fans and disrupt with non Tesla and non Model 3 comments.

rob | 21 March, 2020

+1 @Lonestar10_1999

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