Forums

What an overall great trip this past weekend!

What an overall great trip this past weekend!

We went away for a long graduation weekend this past weekend and found the model 3 to be an excellent car for a road trip. Not that many of you don't already know this. But here are the big impressions that stand out both positive and negative:

1. The distance driven (my 301 mile range) was rather amazing given I was driving at around 75 mph and have 20" performance wheel and was fully loaded down with quite a bit of stuff to and from. While the overall trip was just over 500 miles the Wh/Hr average was 274. I found that quite good.
2. This was my first experience at super charging stations. Wow!!! is all I can say. Stations for 150kw. On the way there we stopped for normal eating and bathroom breaks and I tried to do so at SC stations. Found that was really not necessary as the range was quite good as mentioned in #1 and the chargers, even if we were only there for 10 minutes really pushed in the electrons eliminating any range anxiety. On the way home we did not stop once and ended up home with 17% battery driving at 75 mph which I just charged at home overnight at that point.
3. I drove about 95% of the trip on auto pilot with navigation and auto lane change. This turned out to be amazing in Los Angeles traffic and just in general relieved the stress of driving on your own. On the negative front the auto lane changing really had several annoying issues:
3a. The NoA would move over into an HOV lane because it wanted to go faster, but then realized, i guess, it was there and then wanted to move back. Sometimes it could not because there were no HOV exits. This really annoyed drivers as it methodically moved back and forth. Of course I eventually realized what it was doing and began canceling lane changes as they came up to maintain what a normal human would be doing in this case and the cases mentioned below.

Kary993 | June 18, 2019

3b. Changing lanes when it thought faster lanes were available more often than not resulted in going slower and annoying other drivers. We are not going the speed limit set so it tries to change lanes into a lane it thinks is faster. But then due to it's methodically slow time to maneuver, a fast approaching car in that lane is coming, my car starts it move with the car in front of us closing distance quickly. The car is half way over and realizes that it can't make it because the A-hole that sees the blinker does not yield and we are about to hit the car in front of us because autopilot lingers on the line undecided, so the Auto Pilot steering disengages and I am left to steer the car back into the lane while the autopilot hits the brakes hard to avoid the car in front that it wanted to pass. Not fun, but easily handled if you are alert.
3c. NoA is needing to move over to make an interchange to another freeway. The lane in front is clear and there is a car to the right two car lengths ahead but moving slower than we are. The interchange is a mile and half away maybe two actually. The car initiates the blinker and like a human would do I expect that it will proceed past that slower car, but instead it pulls right up next to it and then hits the brakes pretty hard to fall behind the car when there is nothing in the front of that car. We would easily go by and lane change. Now the cars behind me are getting annoyed.....and rightly so.
3d. In stop and go traffic in Los Angeles, the lane changing was just amazing! It would dive into other lanes to make interchanges and do so almost like a human. Now the speeds are 5 to 25 mph but it would make it's way over without any issue, no horns, no one cut off, well at least no more than anyone else was doing in the heavy traffic. Maybe Elon beefed up this part of the programming because he has to deal with that all the time ;)

Overall, what an excellent trip. Even though there are shortcoming with the NoA it did help out tremendously on this trip. The shortcomings, I hope, with my constant canceling were sent to Tesla to see the above situations and hopefully will improve the logic. That is why I continue to use NoA always, to help out the cause. On the other hand, now that I am more aware of what it will do, toward the later stages of the trip between me and NoA we could act pretty much like any human driver, which was cool!

Kary993 | June 18, 2019

Sorry it would not post in one pass....

billlake2000 | June 18, 2019

Every day is a good day to drive a Tesla.

Mike83 | June 18, 2019

You can set to not do HOA in the Settings. Also you can stop Nav on AP(hit the screen on or off removes blue highlight) to avoid moving out of the lanes and just use the the turn signal to change. The new SoA computer will be coming which most likely will remedy some of your concerns. We so much agree that it makes trips very relaxing and traffic a non-issue. We enjoy the Supercharger stops.
Great write up. The grin is on.

Los Angeles | June 18, 2019

where did you go?

M3phan | June 18, 2019

Great report. Excellent description of current NoA. I agree, have experienced exact same pros and cons. Can’t wait for our first longer trip.

jjgunn | June 18, 2019

I turn off the lane change suggestions.

For instance in the Caldecott Tunnel heading west on Hwy 24 (Bay Area) My nav is set to merge onto Hwy 13 South about 1/2 mile after exiting the tunnel.

Everytime NavAP wants to place me in the far tunnel which means I would need to cross 4 lanes of traffic to get my exit after exiting the tunnel.

I'm playing Chess....NavOnAP is playing checkers. We know it'll improve but right now, it's not ready for primetime.

Kary993 | June 19, 2019

We went to Santa Barbara for our son's graduation. Unfortunately the the trip from San Diego to Santa Barbara took 6 hours to get there but NoA really helped out with the fatigue of that leg of the trip. On the way home we made it in 3 hours and 40 minutes and did not stop. Range was great!

I too am looking forward to the FSD computer I purchased and regardless of the negatives the overall is far better than any regular car by a large margin!

KellyJ | June 19, 2019

@kary993 The car is half way over and realizes that it can't make it because the A-hole that sees the blinker does not yield and we are about to hit the car in front of us because autopilot lingers on the line undecided

The person changing lanes must do the yielding. Having the blinker on doesn't change that.

BuffaloBillsFan | June 19, 2019

The NOA performed well in heavier traffic today around Raleigh/Durham. Got me off one “wannabe” interstate onto I-440 with no problems at all.

Funny enough, my problem is in lighter traffic. On US-64 (no heavy traffic at all), my M3 would change lanes automatically to pass some cars, but then slow down to way below speed limit and not make a move to pass other cars for no apparent reason. No other cars were within 1000+ feet of us. Jarvis just refused to move until I asked him to. Needless to say cussed Jarvis out. Probably hurt his feelings, but IDGAS.

In short, I really do not understand the M3 NOA lane change algorithm at all. It seems to be designed for heavier traffic areas and seems to ignore the easy stuff. WTF? When I was coding, I always addressed the easy shit first. That does not seem to have been the case for Tesla coders.

2 other concerns:

Do not trust the M3 when people are trying to merge into your lane! I decided to try and trust it today, and it nearly resulted in a side collision. My M3 should have sped up (or slowed down], suppose), but instead it did nothing as someone was trying to merge into traffic. We came close to side swiping each other. I do not fault the merging car. Jarvis fucked up that one.

Finally, I was hoping that NOA/AP/ACC would automatically adjust for speed limit changes. That never, ever happens, except for one spot in my trip home every Tuesday and Thursday. The cruise control there automatically adjusts for the speed limit. I have no idea why, but it does. Anywhere else, I have to remind Jarvis about the speed limit when it changes.

BuffaloBillsFan | June 19, 2019

The NOA performed well in heavier traffic today around Raleigh/Durham. Got me off one “wannabe” interstate onto I-440 with no problems at all.

Funny enough, my problem is in lighter traffic. On US-64 (no heavy traffic at all), my M3 would change lanes automatically to pass some cars, but then slow down to way below speed limit and not make a move to pass other cars for no apparent reason. No other cars were within 1000+ feet of us. Jarvis just refused to move until I asked him to. Needless to say I cussed Jarvis out. Probably hurt his feelings, but IDGAS.

In short, I really do not understand the M3 NOA lane change algorithm at all. It seems to be designed for heavier traffic areas and seems to ignore the easy stuff. WTF? When I was coding, I always addressed the easy shit first. That does not seem to have been the case for Tesla coders.

2 other concerns:

Do not trust the M3 when people are trying to merge into your lane! I decided to try and trust it today, and it nearly resulted in a side collision. My M3 should have sped up (or slowed down, I suppose), but instead it did nothing as someone was trying to merge into traffic. We came close to side swiping each other. I do not fault the merging car. Jarvis fucked up that one.

Finally, I was hoping that NOA/AP/ACC would automatically adjust for speed limit changes. That never, ever happens, except for one spot on my trip home every Tuesday and Thursday. The cruise control there automatically adjusts for the speed limit. I have no idea why, but it does. Anywhere else, I have to remind Jarvis about the speed limit when it changes. That annoys the shit out of me. Cruise control should adjust for speed limits!

I still love this car, though. Best one I ever owned.

BuffaloBillsFan | June 19, 2019

Sorry for the double post. I meant to edit the first one . . .