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Induction Versus DC Brushless Motors

Induction Versus DC Brushless Motors

For anyone who is interested in what type of electric motor TESLA uses and why.

https://www.tesla.com/blog/induction-versus-dc-brushless-motors

Coastal Cruiser. | March 26, 2017

Friend Brando, according to my calculations you have been doing some Tesla research lately. :>

I came across that great post too, and if I may, there is another good post from another Tesla Alum, Martin Eberhard. https://www.teslamotors.com/blog/motor-city

It is also noteworthy that Chevy did not go the induction route with the Bolt

brando | March 27, 2017

Thank you Coastal_Cruiser !

Some interesting history of Tesla founding and Martin Eberhard does a great job of explaining electric motor types.

Interesting to see list of electric vehicles going back to 1834.

IF anyone at GM had watched these two videos, would they have followed Tesla Motors? Perhaps not, as the development time/risk might have seemed unnecessary for the inverter and developing the manufacturing technique for motor construction. Easier to go “synchronous permanent-magnet AC motor” (JB quote).

I hope others find these two posts interesting and they will find them informative.

Coastal Cruiser. | March 27, 2017

Indeed.

For completeness, and someone else will assert this if I don't, the GM EV-1 used an AC induction motor. I would love to know from a GM engineer why they went with permanent magnets with the Bolt. Especially since they have what looks like a pretty trick cooling system for the motor.

And, whenever you see "AC" as the motor type, induction or not there is an inverter involved. That's what turns battery DC into the AC used by the motor. I suspect JB was referring to strapping permanent magnets on the rotor instead of configuring the rotor as part of the an induction circuit.

And to GMs credit, I made a post here a while back upon discovering that GM experimented with an all electric vehicle in the mid 70s! https://forums.tesla.com/forum/forums/1960s-electric-corvair-prototype-w...

Cheers

brando | April 3, 2017

Alan Cocconi and Wally Rippel (who started AC propulsion) I think met doing the GM electric motors in the 80s?. They used MOSFET (and not IGBTs)) and so magnets were the best. And, as I remember Marc T said the newer IGBTs allowed Tesla Roadster to go from dual speed to single speed gear box. These things are well above my understanding so consider as mere hearsay until verified.