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Auto pilot one update

Auto pilot one update

Hello, over the weekend my 2014 Tesla model S received an update 2018.21.9 75dbc11 And now my auto pilot nanny is making me touch the wheel every 20sec it’s driving me crazy, is anyone else experiencing this with the update? It’s not referenced in the release notes when I called Tesla they confirmed they’ve increased the auto pilot nanny monitoring system.

It’s so bad I might as well drive the car myself. I would be curious to see if anyone else is dealing with the same issue

Thank you

Jeff

TesMD | June 11, 2018

There is already another thread about this. Yes, this happened with latest update. I have the same thoughts as you.

New update makes AP more of nuisance than driver assistance.

jkellner | June 11, 2018

TesMD do you have the link to that other thread? I can’t seem to find it. I’ve never thought about purchasing a device to override this feature but this is so bad I may have to invest in one.

rxlawdude | June 11, 2018

Every 23 seconds, to be precise. On an Interstate straightaway.

kickgas | June 11, 2018

Every 35-40 secs for me even with my hand lightly on the wheel. Actually sorry I updated!

dvanlier | June 11, 2018

There are 3 other threads about it actually, my solution is not to update. I did that with AP1 on my old model S when they changed the nags from 3 minutes to 1 minute. My hope is that FSD will entail no nags on the freeway.

Uncle Paul | June 11, 2018

Believe this update is just a step towards the projected major update in August.

So many accidents have been caused by people not holding their hands on the wheels as instructed. What else is Tesla to do.

From people sticking an orange into the wheel, taping a weight on one side, a commercial vendor selling stick on weights, people posting from the back seat, or in a rental Tesla eating a huge hamburger and messy fries while going down the road no handed and looking into the camera instead of down the road.

I fear we have brought this on to ourself by our own exhibition of bad behavior.

Rowlie | June 12, 2018

@UnclePaul Those issues are poor drivers, not Tesla's issue. If they crash, it's completely their fault. Even if we crash using AutoPilot, it's completely our fault because we're supposed to be paying attention and in control of the car. Nagging more often doesn't change that. Changing the nag interval indicates that Tesla is assuming some of that responsibility and not leaving it completely in the driver's camp. It also annoys many of us to the point of not using AutoPilot anymore.

reed_lewis | June 12, 2018

It may be the driver's fault, but the news media reports that a Tesla crashed into some car/obstruction and by inference the average person infers that Teslas are not safe cars because of this. Tesla is merely doing what it can to lower the instances of crashes because of people not paying attention.

Yodrak. | June 12, 2018

"Changing the nag interval indicates that Tesla is assuming some of that responsibility "

I disagree. Rather, it indicates that Tesla is being proactive in anticipating that NHTSA may assign it a portion of the blame for accidents when AP was in use, which has happened in the past.

"Tesla is merely doing what it can to lower the instances of crashes because of people not paying attention."

I agree.

Silver2K | June 12, 2018

My hand is on the steering wheel 90% (estimate) of the time anyway, bring on the update!! :)

Tropopause | June 12, 2018

Just use AP as directed and keep your hand(s) on the wheel.

Uncle Paul | June 12, 2018

Hey! I changed my mind.

This update really sucks. Autopilot is now a pain in the butt.

Even keeping both hands on the wheel the nag comes on. If I rock the wheel enough to keep the nag away the autopilot chimes off.

It has become unusuable for me. Will be turning it off and using manual until I get the next update.

Wish all those people did not do and post all those foolish things. They have ruined autopilot for everybody.

lilbean | June 12, 2018

It's like when kids play and pretend they are driving. They constantly jiggle the wheel.

TranzNDance | June 12, 2018

@lilbean, good point about pretend driving. The one time that I felt sick in the car was when the driver was jiggling the wheel all the time.

sentabo | June 12, 2018

I don't know if I'm just lucky, or what? I received the same update as the OP over the weekend. I just returned from a 20 minute drive, mostly highway. I used the AP (AP1) and did not get nagged even once. I did what I've always done: rest my arm on my thigh, one hand lightly on the wheel and give it a very slight---and I mean very slight---torque occasionally. Knock on wood, so far nothing changed for me with the update.

JAD | June 12, 2018

Sentabo +1, I haven't noticed a difference as I rarely got the nag before and rarely get it now. Just slight resistance to hinder the small corrections the car makes and you don't get any nags. Not hard. Braking does seem better approaching stopped cars.

vpoz | June 12, 2018

Nah interval’s now about the same as that on a Leaf with ProPilot.

Haggy | June 14, 2018

"So many accidents have been caused by people not holding their hands on the wheels as instructed. What else is Tesla to do.

From people sticking an orange into the wheel, taping a weight on one side, a commercial vendor selling stick on weights"

I don't know of a single case of a driver saying after an accident that autopilot was on and he/she was paying attention but couldn't get hands on the wheel fast enough. In all cases, drivers aren't paying attention. Whether your fingers are looped around the wheel or your hands are on your lap palms up, it's the reaction time that't the issue, not the small fraction of a second it takes to move your hands. If that were a problem, then people with TACC would be forced to keep their foot lightly on the brake just in case. It's not a sound argument. Moving the foot takes about a full second. Reaction time from an attentive driver who is expecting a random event but doesn't know when it's coming is about a second. Moving hands to the wheel isn't significant because even changing grip can take as long as moving hands to the wheel. The distance it takes to move hands to the wheel is such a small fraction of the distance that hands move while turning the wheel that if it were really a problem then steering itself would be a problem in any car.

Before power steering, cars had large steering wheels. There was also play in the steering column. The amount that the wheel might have moved before anything happened was probably as much as moving hands from a lap to the wheel. There's only so far a person can take hands from the wheel in the first place.

I simply don't buy the notion that not holding the wheel is the problem. It's not paying attention.

As for oranges, weights and the likes, not only won't this stop that (those people won't be affected) it will make it worse. More people will be abusing this than ever.

john | June 15, 2018

@TedMD: A nuisance is far too kind, the frequent nag is really a collosal pain in the ass. I don’t know why Tesla’s software engineers think that they’ll capture more Autopilot driver data from cars when drivers will wean off of using Autopilot!

151853136 | June 15, 2018

@Uncle Paul "So many accidents have been caused by people not holding their hands on the wheels as instructed. What else is Tesla to do."

You are so unbelievably wrong. So many accidents have been caused by people not watching the road and monitoring the AP. Not by people who haven't kept their hands on the wheel at all time. I drive 2000 miles a month mostly on AP1 and ofc won't hold the wheel the entire time I mean that's the whole point of the AP1. I am not some random idiot too. I am a pilot and a car-reviewer. The system works very well if you keep an eye on it. Hands on the wheel at all times only defeats the purpose of the system and doesn't make the driving safer.

sentabo | June 15, 2018

"I simply don't buy the notion that not holding the wheel is the problem. It's not paying attention."

I agree wholeheartedly. But look at it from Tesla's point of view. Though probably unjustified, they're feeling the heat because of the high level of publicity every time a Tesla is involved in an accident, especially if AP was employed. They felt the need to react. What else could they do? There are people who go into AP mode and do not pay attention to the road. The only way to combat those miscreants is to nag them more often.

If there is something else Tesla could have done, I'm sure they'd love to hear your suggestions.

151853136 | June 15, 2018

+sentabo they could. I think they should measure how fast a person reacts when a nag comes one after a couple minutes or whatever, and depending on that reaction time increase or decrease the timer of the nagging. Nagging every 20 seconds makes the system pointless to me. It was so good before and worked so well the 30k miles I drove with this thing mostly on AP and now it's literally a crippled system to me.
But I do agree, that some people exploited it and the media has blown it out of proportion. But I hate that Tesla is now bending down.

Stiction | June 15, 2018

151853136; (whats up with that ID?)

Sadly , what Telsa needs is eye tracking. But we don't have it.

john | June 15, 2018

I truly hope that a software genius hacks the system and successfully deactivates the nag!!!

Tesla has no business advertising and marketing “autopilot” to lure buyers when it is just delivering a feature that falls very short of its usability!!

We are trusted to make decisions hundreds of times each and every day on how to drive, but then are not trusted to make decisions on how we drive!!! Makes perfect sense!!!!

EnglishGuy | June 15, 2018

For four years my answer to the question “how do you like your car” has been “best car I ever owned”. If they leave the AP nag like this it will be the last Tesla I ever own. For me AP is one of the biggest reasons for owning the car. I am embarrassed to demonstrate AP now. They have totally ruined it. They should add an option to enable “aggressive nagging” with the option of disabling after accepting a disclaimer.

john | June 15, 2018

I will buy another Tesla if I get $10,000 off of the price to forgo the Autopilot hardware that is installed by default. With such lousy Autopilot software, who needs the hardware???

john | June 15, 2018

@Stiction: I also don’t want Tesla tracking my eyes, I would rather have Tesla give their customers the respect they deserve!!

NKYTA | June 15, 2018

John, i don’t think is the car for you.

151853136, I am a pilot and a car-reviewer.
This is not the car for you.

A Tesla is a thinking persons car. JT ibid.

john | June 15, 2018

@NKYTA: Tesla should have discounted the price I paid, because the Autoplot feature they sold me on is really NOT usable! Then how is it that you came to drive one?

NKYTA | June 15, 2018

Easy, I got a 2012 Tesla. I’ve been driving it for many years. No AP. It’s a car.

But 85k blows your bullshit out of the water.

NKYTA | June 15, 2018

File your class action FUD producing crap, and we can have our lawyers go mano et mono.

You are missing the goal, and you shouldn’t be selected.

NKYTA | June 15, 2018

Worth saying twice, this car is not for you.

SbMD | June 15, 2018

@NKYTA + 1

john | June 15, 2018

Wow, you have lawyers? Legal talk is always an impressive entry when making a statement. Worth saying again, the new autopilot code conflicts with how the feature is marketed.

SbMD | June 15, 2018

@john - you are way off base on basically all of your posts. Here's why:

- all the cars with AP hardware will "learn" whether the driver has AP activated or not, and whether the feature is on or not. This is part of the fleet learning which has been discussed ad nauseam and ad infinitum
- attention on the road -- and in this case using hands on the wheel to help confirm -- is necessary with driver assist systems, whether is it Tesla or another manufacturer.
- claiming "autopilot code conflicts with how the feature is marketed" is a statement without any rational basis; how exactly it your statement accurate? Are there marketing materials you have seen which indicate that one can shut their eyes and bury their face while running AP? Indeed, I am using some hyperbole here, but it only mirrors the level of hyperbolic indignation you are expressing to the contrary.

Be safe. AP is not FSD. That's abundantly clear.

NKYTA | June 15, 2018

What @SbMD said.

“will buy another Tesla if I get $10,000 off of the price to forgo the Autopilot hardware that is installed by default. With such lousy Autopilot software, who needs the hardware???”

I’ll take your “hardware”, because you can’t appreciate it. And can’t grok it.

minervo.florida | June 16, 2018

I love my AP1, fantastic, been using it for years, still amazing.

John, it is not the car for you.

Haggy | June 19, 2018

"+sentabo they could. I think they should measure how fast a person reacts when a nag comes one after a couple minutes or whatever, and depending on that reaction time increase or decrease the timer of the nagging."

I agree. They could also factor in following distance and nag people more if they keep less than a three second following distance. Aggressive drivers who have less time to react when they don't pay attention are the problem. People who have been using it since it's been out and never even got a warning chime aren't the problem.

Catmuffy | April 24, 2019

I tried the Autopilot trial...and after the trial I went with the Autopilot software...What I don’t like about the basic Autopilot is I lost the ability to change lanes on Autopilot. Autopilot is a nice feature however with out lane change feature you might as well use TACC. Canceling Autopilot to change lanes then starting over again doesn’t make much sense.. Just my opinion.

RAR | April 25, 2019

@Catmuffy
Lane change now requires FSD. With the previous version of autopilot (EAP) lane change is available on multilane highways by using the turn signal. Earlier this feature was limited in EAP to limited access roads, but it was added for all multilane roads sometime in 2018.