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Falcon Wing Doors

Falcon Wing Doors

I would like to know if there will be option to have regular rear doors.

dlake | 30 June 2014

No. Falcon wing doors are a defining feature of the MX.

Iowa92x | 1 July 2014

Falcon is the X.

barrykmd | 1 July 2014

They should package the optional third row seating with the falcon doors. Without the third row seats, it's unnecessary.

NumberOne | 1 July 2014

I have said this so many times that I lost count, but this car is intended to appeal to people as a family vehicle, replacing a minivan. For people who have young children, it is not even about the third row.

Some want and need it, and some do not, but strapping a young child into an car equipped with falcon wing doors is significantly easier than doing the same thing in either a vehicle with standard doors or with sliding doors. I do not have to do this, but I still see the benefit, having pulled back muscles many times, so I am not going to say that I do not want the doors simply because I do not need them.

Having one type of door on the car is much more economical from a manufacturing cost point of view. If you really do not want Falcon wing doors, either get a Model S, or wait for another Tesla SUV with standard doors. Tesla is bound to produce something for every budget and taste within the next 5 years or so.

A lot of engineering R&D went into the Falcon wing doors. They are a signature feature of the Model X and they will not be going away as dlake and Iowa92x also pointed out.

mdemetri | 1 July 2014

No one is saying they should go away, just that the Falcon doors become an option (just like the third row).

I get the baby/toddler issue and better access with Falcon doors. But trust me, those kids grow up quickly and before you know it, you are car pooling 4 or more kids to soccer practice, swim meets etc etc. This is when a third row becomes essential. Note that young kids cannot sit in the front seat, so a third row is essential for car pooling 4 or more kids.

Thus, I maintain getting the falcon doors without the third row makes little practical sense (unless you are getting rid of the vehicle in a couple of years), even if you are currently only transporting babies/toddlers in the second row. They should be coupled as stated above by barrykmd. Kids grow quickly, get many friends and before you know it, that third row will be essential.

robertcojones | 1 July 2014

As a tall person who has sat in the original mock-up with the doors open and closed I can tell you that the depth of the trim around the glass is such that it is like putting on a hat when the doors close and not very pleasant.
Also as a father with two active boys I would like to be able to utilize a roof rack for skiing or cycling trips. Both seem tricky to say the least with the falcon door.
Lastly, they are likely quite heavy and expensive to engineer (having had a chance to closely inspect)compared to a regular door.

If Tesla has solved the problems above I'll have mine with fancy doors. Until then - are regular doors such an imposition?

NumberOne | 2 July 2014

Since the initial Model X reveal there has never been any indication from Tesla that there might be anything other than the falcon wing doors.

I too am tall, but I never sit in the back, so it is not going to be a problem for me. I no longer need to strap in my kids, but I think it would be great for people who do. I too am very active, but there is sufficient space in the car for skis etc. As for bicycles, I will just have to get a bike rack to attach to the hitch receiver.

rdalcanto | 2 July 2014

Roof racks for bikes are outdated. They make noise and rob you of fuel economy, even without bikes on top. I know many people who destroyed bikes by driving into garages or other structures with the bikes on top. A good hitch rack is 100X better. My favorite is made by 1upusa (www.1upusa.com).

gfb107 | 2 July 2014

It is completely impractical to make the falcon-wing doors optional.

You would need 2 designs for:

The frame
The roof
The jambs
The seals
The panels
The windows
The hinges
The locks
The assembly process