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Model S wider than a 7 series?

Model S wider than a 7 series?

I just saw the Model S in the Santana row today. While I was very enthusiastic, my wife commented on how the car looks too wide. Indeed, the width of this car is better than a 7 series or an S class. That, and the square edges in the cabin are off putting, at best. Also there seems to be no single sunroof with shade option. I am not sure about the ergonomics of an entirely touch based console. The showroom guy said they are working on adding hard buttons to the steering wheel to control the console... I am unconvinced, somehow. I am used to the superb ergonomics of my TSX and the 3 series (except for the climate controls in the 3) and a finicky touch control has driven me crazy many a times ( in my droid-x, example)

While I love this car for it's unique propulsion, balance, super fast acceleration, and ecological responsibility some details are a little jarring for a car that fancies itself in the company of 5 series, E class, etc.

Why did they have to make the car so damn wide?

Mycroft | 21 December 2011

I hear you. I'm constantly trying to park my SLK to avoid door bangers and the Model S will be a much bigger challenge in that department.

vouteb | 21 December 2011

There goes my mirrors in the narrow London streets and UK Parking spaces! :(

vouteb | 21 December 2011

sorry to ask since there is so much written about this now, but what do I get extra as a Siganture owner instead of a top of the (battery) range S?

Volker.Berlin | 21 December 2011

- jump the line of P reservation holders
- exclusive interior and exterior colors
- badging

That's it, according to what we know by now. Maybe some more goodies will be announced, but that's unclear at this point. In any case, there are a lot of threads where this questions fits much better. It is entirely off topic here... ;-)

Whity Whiteman | 21 December 2011

@ Volker Berlin:

Width including mirrors:
BMW 5: 2094 mm
BMW 7: 2134 mm
Model S: 2189 mm ???

Hello Volker, the Model S is (77,3") 1,963Meter wide!
Isn't it?

Volker.Berlin | 21 December 2011

Hello iphone, yes it is. Your quote is from October 10, 2011. At that time the Model S Facts page stated the numbers I then cited as "approximate dimensions". Since there was updated information on the "Options & Pricing" page that went online last night, I updated this thread with a new post today. :-)

Timo | 21 December 2011

@vouteb, look at the picture from front. If the mirrors are in danger, then the entire car side is in danger. Mirrors do not add much to car width.

@iphone, there were older specs in the site claiming 2189mm width. That has now changed over 10 cm, which is quite a lot. I don't know what happened to previous figure, because that was there after beta had been already revealed. Is final actually that much narrower, or was that just some measuring error.

Discoducky | 21 December 2011

Color me amazed at the width difference. Can't wait to see the production spec car!

Robert.Boston | 24 December 2011

I'm willing to bet a small sum that the 77.3" dimension is without mirrors. But as timo noted, the mirrors look to add only an inch or so on each side. Even at 80", the Model S is wide, but not nearly as crazy wide as we had first thought.

Volker.Berlin | 25 December 2011

I'm willing to bet a small sum that the 77.3" dimension is without mirrors. (Robert.Boston)

I cannot get that very thought out of my head since I discovered the substantial difference between the announced with and the "final" (?) width published on Dec 21. I hope that it's actually the overall width including mirrors, though, b/c anything wider than 2 m (78.7") would officially disallow the Model S on the passenger car lane in German Autobahn road work passages.
http://www.teslamotors.com/forum/forums/model-s-passt-durch-deutsche-aut...

David70 | 25 December 2011

From the photograph, it looks like the mirrors are folded in a bit. That should probably the most important aspect. It's only at low speeds that minimal car width is important. They've said nothing about it, but perhaps they fold in at a button push when not needed.

On the other hand if as close to the car as shown in that measurement image, then the car must be narrower behind the mirrors than in front of them.

David70 | 25 December 2011

P.S. I take that all back. I just had another look at the photograph, and what is apparent is the at the mirror level, the car is much narrower than at the wheel level.

Volker.Berlin | 5 June 2012

I'm willing to bet a small sum that the 77.3" dimension is without mirrors. (Robert.Boston)

You may win that bet after all. A new picture is up on the Specs page that says:
- Width (mirrors extended): 86.1" (2187 mm)
- Width (mirrors folded): 77.3" (1963 mm)
http://www.teslamotors.com/models/specs

(You may have to force your browser to reload the page to see the new image.)

That, in fact, would be a little wider than the largest German sedan, including the 7-series, and in the same ballpark as the widest German SUVs. See numbers mentioned above in this thread.

Epley | 5 June 2012

I get the width issue a bit. I love being able to fit into any parking space with my Saturn. Given the size of the all the other behemoths on the road these days, I don't think the width will be an issue. It's hard to understand how a few inches one way or another would make or break a purchase deicsion: you have to look at the product as a whole.

Red Shift--take a test ride when they become available, then make your decision...

Alex K | 5 June 2012

I have a Porsche Panamera S Hybrid and noticed that the exterior dimensions of the Tesla Model S are very similar to the Panamera. I made a table comparing the dimensions. Hopefully HTML table formatting works:

DimensionsTesla Model SPorsche Panamera

Wheelbase116.5 in.114.9 in.
Overall length195.9 in.195.7 in.
Height56.5 in.55.8 in.
Width w/Mirrors86.1 in.83.2 in.
Width wo/Mirrors77.3 in.76 in.
Front Track65.4 in.65.3 in.
Rear Track66.9 in.65.4 in.
Front Legroom42.0 in.41.9 in.
Rear Legroom36.7 in.33.3 in.
Front Headroom39.8 in.38 in.
Rear Headroom36.6 in.38.2 in.
Front Shoulder Room57.6 in.51.9 in.
Rear Shoulder Room55.0 in.51.7 in.
Turning circle37 ft.39 ft.
Rear Luggage capacity66 cu ft.40.7 cu. ft.

Alex K | 5 June 2012

I guess the table formatting doesn't work, but you get the idea.

Brian H | 6 June 2012

Alex K;
You can use the <pre> tag and use the spacebar (no tabs) to make a table layout.

Dimensions Tesla Model S Porsche Panamera

Wheelbase 116.5 in. 114.9 in.
Overall length 195.9 in. 195.7 in.

Brian H | 6 June 2012

Alex K;
You can use the <pre> tag and use the spacebar (no tabs) to make a table layout.

Dimensions Tesla Model S Porsche Panamera

Wheelbase 116.5 in. 114.9 in.
Overall length 195.9 in. 195.7 in.

Brian H | 6 June 2012

Almost:

Dimensions Tesla Model S Porsche Panamera

Wheelbase 116.5 in. 114.9 in.
Overall length 195.9 in. 195.7 in.

Timo | 6 June 2012

Too bad that font size and type used with pre-tag is borderlining unreadable.

Testing testing testing

Timo | 6 June 2012

OK you can use h1, h2 etc with pre to make it more readable. The test above is with h1

This is with h2 test
This is with h3 test
This is with h4 test
This is with h5 test
This is with h6 test

Timo | 6 June 2012

Or not, it looks like using h1 etc puts the line in somewhere else than you think it goes.

double-line h6
testing testing testing
second line testing

Timo | 6 June 2012

Looks like that one works if you just start the h6-pre combo in new line and don't try to put it after normal text.

Volker.Berlin | 6 June 2012

Actually, the original "table" served the purpose just fine. Much more so than the 6 posts following it, that did not offer any contribution to the topic at hand.

Why not create a test-test thread and post there until you know how it works?

Timo | 6 June 2012

Too lazy to make new thread I guess. This should look better:

Dimensions Tesla Model S Porsche Panamera

Wheelbase 116.5 in. 114.9 in.
Overall length 195.9 in. 195.7 in.
Height 56.5 in. 55.8 in.
Width w/Mirrors 86.1 in. 83.2 in.
Width wo/Mirrors 77.3 in. 76 in.
Front Track 65.4 in. 65.3 in.
Rear Track 66.9 in. 65.4 in.
Front Legroom 42.0 in. 41.9 in.
Rear Legroom 36.7 in. 33.3 in.
Front Headroom 39.8 in. 38 in.
Rear Headroom 36.6 in. 38.2 in.
Front Shoulder Room 57.6 in. 51.9 in.
Rear Shoulder Room 55.0 in. 51.7 in.
Turning circle 37 ft. 39 ft.
Rear Luggage capacity 66 cu ft. 40.7 cu. ft.

Brian H | 6 June 2012

Timo;
Perfect! You da master table-maker.

Mycroft | 6 June 2012

Wow, over 3 inches wider than a Panamera! Wow!

Brian H | 6 June 2012

Under 3", actually. 2.9".

Volker.Berlin | 28 October 2012

I found that it is actually wrong to compare the Model S to family sedans. It should be compared to four-door sport coupes. In that league, it isn't far off base with its dimensions:

Height x Width incl. mirrors x Length in mm
Model S: 1435 x 2189 x 4978 (widest)
Aston Martin Rapide: 1360 x 2140 x 5019 (lowest)
Audi A7: 1420 x 2139 x 4969
Porsche Panamera: 1418 x 2114 x 4970
BMW 6 Gran Coupe: 1392 x 2081 x 5007
Mercedes CLS: 1416 x 2075 x 4940 (shortest)
Maserati Quattroporte: 1438 x 1991 x 5097 (longest, highest, smallest)

(ordered by width, all data directly from the respective manufacturer's own website, all widths explicitly incl. mirrors)

And I did find a very popular car that is quite a bit wider than the Model S and yet seems to fit in out communal garage (so I should be fine, too): The Volkswagen Multivan at 1970 x 2283 x 4892 ;-)

RedShift | 28 October 2012

Turning circle ain't so bad for such a large car!

Guess I have to live with it. On long journeys (thanks for the supercharges, Tesla) me and my family will appreciate the extra space every bit.

Brian H | 28 October 2012

VB;
The van has the advantage of sliding doors, I assume, so ingress and egress might still be an issue.

Michael23 | 28 October 2012

Any theories on why the mirrors stick out so much? All I can think of is maybe to let air through between, my SUV is wider in the body, but has narrower mirrors so the s is overall wider.

Volker.Berlin | 29 October 2012

All I can think of is maybe to let air through between (Michael23)

As far as I can tell, that's exactly the reason. Ideally, the mirror would be a completely separate, tear drop-shaped object, and what they've done on the Model S mirrors is a close as it gets. You'll notice a very similar design on recent BMW's and MB's, with the mirror separated from the body and only held by a relatively low-profile tentacle.

vouteb | 29 October 2012

the width of the car incl mirrors is my biggest concern for Europe

(I do hope they fold automatically when they get here)

vouteb | 29 October 2012

these are my Jaguar XF dimensions:

Overall width with mirrors folded (mm) 1,939
Overall width including mirrors (mm) 2,077

S:
2.195 (plus 2.5 cm)
1.970 (plus 1 cm)

correct?

Volker.Berlin | 29 October 2012

Update to my above post:

Height x Width incl. mirrors x Length in mm
Model S: 1435 x 2189 x 4978 (widest)
Aston Martin Rapide: 1360 x 2140 x 5019 (lowest)
Audi A7: 1420 x 2139 x 4969
Porsche Panamera: 1418 x 2114 x 4970
BMW 6 Gran Coupe: 1392 x 2081 x 5007
Jaguar XF: 1460 x 2077 x 4961 (tallest)
Mercedes CLS: 1416 x 2075 x 4940 (shortest)
Maserati Quattroporte: 1438 x 1991 x 5097 (longest, smallest)

(ordered by width, all data directly from the respective manufacturer's own website, all widths explicitly incl. mirrors)

DTsea | 29 October 2012

A standard US garage door is 96" wide, less 1" for trim is 95". My current car (a toyota sienna, soon to be replaced by my Model S) is WIDER with mirrors extended than the stated width of the Model S- and I can park it just fine. Door dings are maybe the only issue. But I like that three people can really sit in the back comfortably, which hasn't been the case in any car I have driven since the 70s...

rodf | 28 December 2012

I'm really excited about the prospect of getting a Tesla, but the large width does give me pause. I currently drive a relatively small car (Lexus SC430) and with tight parking spaces in Hawaii size is sometimes a problem. We also have a Toyota Camry hybrid, which according to specs is 71.70". Can it really be, with mirrors extended, that the Tesla is a full 14.5" larger at 86.2"?

jat | 28 December 2012

@Michael23 - I assume the larger mirrors are partly to make up for the poor visibility out the rear window.

gregv64 | 28 December 2012

You have to be very careful about widths. Most of the time car widths mentioned are the mirrors folded widths. Your Camry is 71.7" with mirrors folded, which compares to the 77.3" mirrors folded width of the Model S, so the S is 5.6" wider.

rodf | 28 December 2012

Thanks, gregv4, 5.6 sure sounds a lot more acceptable.

pbrulott | 28 December 2012

Without mirrors is maybe the best comparable for parking

E350 is 75.9
S is 77.3
5 Series is 73.2
Camry is 71.7
Panamera is 76

my current SUV Tribeca is 73.9

CX-9 is 76.2

So Model S is very wide but I think I can manage + or - 2 inches on each side

trydesky | 28 December 2012

@rodf

I agree with you...while there is ZERO chance the width will keep me from getting the S, it does give me pause. Every time I park my skinny Prius it a tight spot I think, there's no way I'll park my S here. And I'm really worried about parking at the Mall, etc...

I think I'll become one of those driver who park real far from the entrance, all buy themselves.

Brian H | 28 December 2012

trydesky;
And then unload your electric bike from the back to reach the store. ;)

rodf | 28 December 2012

trydesky - Exactly, I'm already thinking based on where I'm going and need to park, which car shall I bring?

lfeiwel | 30 November 2013

so, now that much time has passed. Can anyone confirm width of Model S, regardless of mirrors. What is the width of the car at the rear wheels?

Thanks

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