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UK Motorway Charging - Now more expensive than Petrol/Diesel

UK Motorway Charging - Now more expensive than Petrol/Diesel

On Thursday Ecotricity announced they are finally applying a charge to use their rapid chargers across the UK motorway network as well as all IKEA Uk stores. It's worth mentioning that they have a complete monopoly on fast chargers at motorway service stations, meaning you have no choice but to use them if you are making a long distance trip.

I need to emphasise it's not the fact that they have gone from offering free charging to paid for, more specifically its the cost.

From next week to charge your car on their network will cost £5 in return you will get 20 mins of charge, regardless of charging speed. Ecotricity state that if you switch to their home electricity provider they will offer you access to charging for free, however because their niche is clean energy they are not competitive. Some have calculated that they could be paying up to £800 more per year on their home electricity bill.

Of course this announcement has caused me to consider canceling my order, as I simply could not afford to pay more for Electricity than I do for Petrol. Are other UK Tesla customers concerned? What do our friends over the pond think about this pricing structure? Are companies in USA or parts of Europe equally as costly? I'd imagine not if running an EV is indeed more costly than running a petrol car.

To share my maths with you, I would presume that considering the range of EV's out there, your £5 could get you between 15/50 miles of range within that half hour rapid charge. Considering my current Petrol Car will give me around 450 miles on a full tank costing £40/50, I'm not wrong in describing this new offering from Ecotricity as unfair.

Thoughts?

Tstolz | 9 July 2016

Just charge at home for daily travel and use the supercharger network for distance travel .. it's free for life. Why are you posting this .. it's only material for non Tesla owners.

shaunbentley | 9 July 2016

As I mentioned, I'm posting it here as its making me consider canceling my reservation. It's also not practical to use only supercharger network in the UK if you only have Model 3 range.

EaglesPDX | 9 July 2016

A major draw in the EV's is you "fuel up" at home on cheap, night time residential electricity rates.

The travel chargers are just that, when one is traveling beyond one's 100 mile radius home range.

$5/50 miles on EV
$5/50 miles on you ICE

If I've done the math right on your two different calcs above.

If you are totally dependent on public charging stations, not sure an EV is practical.

BAT1 | 9 July 2016

If Ecotricity supply your home electricity charging is still free. :-)

SamO | 9 July 2016

I guess the pay per charge model isn't as attractive as some have claimed . . . lulz

#DriveFree

Mike83 | 9 July 2016

The UK voted to leave the EU. I hear real estate values are dropping, the pound hitting new lows, credit ratings dropped making money borrowing more expensive among other new problems.
I hope you British come out of this not too damaged and can still afford a Tesla.

Ross1 | 9 July 2016

In France in particular, it costs as much for tolls as it does for diesel/petrol.
Maybe that is off topic?

bb0tin | 9 July 2016

@SamO
How about if it is $0.50 per charge?
You fail to understand that the cost of pay-per-charge makes a difference.
You fail to understand that not everybody, including myself, want a high one-off fee.
Your particular preferences do not determine what is preferable for others.

glennjturner | 10 July 2016

Firstly there are many complaints about the new ecotricity pricing from current users. There needs to be a balance of charging for time at the charger as well as covering the cost of the electricity. E.g. pay for use and stop people hogging the charging point. I strongly suspect once ecotricity upgrade all the charging points they may refine the charging model as it doesn’t seem to work for many users/cars.

Having owned a Tesla since 2014 (driven 38,000 miles) I’ve had a few experiences of the charging options. Firstly when I bought the Tesla there were just a couple of superchargers. Ecotricity was quite critical for longer trips. However the superchargers are now the first option for longer trips and there is more appearing all the time. At some motorway services they appear alongside ecotricty. I rarely use ecotricty chargers now, in fact I’m more likely to use chargeyourcar network.

The chargeyourcar network is also huge now, although less likely found at motorway services. It is very useful for the long drives to remote places. Plus they appear at public carparks which makes them a very convenient option for some trips.

Competition for charging hasn’t really started yet. There are now many charging points and more being added but they are not competing for business yet like petrol pumps do. My guess is this will start to change soon (sometime in the next 1 - 3 years).

I greeted the ecotricity news with a ‘meh’. They are just one option. I will still use them when needed and there are no other sensible options. Yes it will cost a bit more but it’s hardly worth worrying about. Admittedly there maybe people who are more concerned. Leaf owners need to charge more often because of the smaller battery for example. And I’m guessing there are some areas around the country where ecotricity charging points are important because of the geographical location.

Tstolz | 10 July 2016

Tesla Supercharger cost today if used 13 times per year for 6 years (78 times) = $2,000 / 78 = $25.64 per use.

The OP suggests $6.47 (5L converted to USD) for 20 minutes @ 50 miles (or 80 min 200 miles) = $25.88 per use.

Looks like both can be expensive. Superchargers of course come down in cost the more you use them, are much faster, are reliable, and are everywhere (growing network) ... so not really apples to apples. Tesla Superchargers are clearly better!

OP - you are probably overestimating how much you will use 3rd party chargers. Map out your driving patterns ... cars are parked 95% of the time. The EV refuelling paradigm is different vs ICE. With EVs, you refuel at home and when you aren't using them ... ICE age cars need to be refuelled away from home and when you are using them.

glennjturner | 10 July 2016

One other thing to add to the mix. Elon has suggested a new supercharging charging mode for the model 3 (hinted at pay as you go), plus the very act of the model 3 going on sales means the need for a lot more superchargers.

Hence in the future lots more superchargers and likely another pay model for them for model 3 owners.

KP in NPT | 10 July 2016

Looking at the map for 2016 superchargers in the UK, it looks like many more are expected to be added. I would assume the same will hold true for 2017 and beyond as needed. I don't know your driving habits, but I agree with Tstoltz that you are probably overestimating how much you would use 3rd party chargers.

SamO | 10 July 2016

@gleenjturner,

Elon never hinted at pay per use, although some who are incredibly bad at math have.

See the original Model s60 "activation charge" model for Model 3.

#DriveFree

Appmacguy | 10 July 2016

I have owned a BEV (Renault Zoe) for three years now and use the Ecotricity chargers now and then. They have enabled me to travel to London, Cardiff and other places from the Midlands and to show friends and family that long distance travel can be done in a car with a summer range of 90-95 miles.

My reason for getting a BEV was environmental and the cost savings were a bonus. That means no road tax, free parking and charging at work and use of the Ecotricity chargers. From day one supported Ecotricity by moving our electricity and gas supply to them. This was again environmental, green energy for my home and car and also I believed in supporting the network they were offering me access to for FREE! They even gave a £40 year discount on my energy bill for owning an electric car. Profits that Ecotricity make go towards building more wind and solar farms. To me this is all great and if I pay slightly more for my energy then so be it, it's for the good of us all!

All I'd say is look at the bigger picture here and the good work they have done already setting up the network and offering people like myself free travel up to now. Give them a go, there is no contract and you can leave at any point if you find them more expensive. As a bonus you'd get free motorway travel, factor that cost in and it's not that bad really. Green energy will make your green halo glow that little brighter :)

*Just my opinion. I have no links to Ecotricity. Model 3 on order pre-reveal 31st March and never going back to fossil fuel.

Appmacguy | 10 July 2016

I have owned a BEV (Renault Zoe) for three years now and use the Ecotricity chargers now and then. They have enabled me to travel to London, Cardiff and other places from the Midlands and to show friends and family that long distance travel can be done in a car with a summer range of 90-95 miles.

My reason for getting a BEV was environmental and the cost savings were a bonus. That means no road tax, free parking and charging at work and use of the Ecotricity chargers. From day one supported Ecotricity by moving our electricity and gas supply to them. This was again environmental, green energy for my home and car and also I believed in supporting the network they were offering me access to for FREE! They even gave a £40 year discount on my energy bill for owning an electric car. Profits that Ecotricity make go towards building more wind and solar farms. To me this is all great and if I pay slightly more for my energy then so be it, it's for the good of us all!

All I'd say is look at the bigger picture here and the good work they have done already setting up the network and offering people like myself free travel up to now. Give them a go, there is no contract and you can leave at any point if you find them more expensive. As a bonus you'd get free motorway travel, factor that cost in and it's not that bad really. Green energy will make your green halo glow that little brighter :)

*Just my opinion. I have no links to Ecotricity. Model 3 on order pre-reveal 31st March and never going back to fossil fuel.

glennjturner | 10 July 2016

@SamO

the quote from elon was "Obviously, [free Supercharging] fundamentally has a cost. … The obvious thing to do is decouple that from the cost of the Model 3. So it will still be very cheap, and far cheaper than gasoline, to drive long-distance with the Model 3, but it will not be free long distance for life unless you purchase that package. I wish we could, but in order to achieve the economics, it has to be something like that."

So yes it looks like supercharger option add-on package just like the 60kwh. But I suspect there maybe another option for the model 3 owners nearer production time. Ok so I was wrong and Elon didn't suggest pay per use. But the careful comments to me suggest there other options are planned or at least being considered. I maybe reading too much into what he said.

Ross1 | 10 July 2016

Tesla can't offer Paid S/C use until they are registered everywhere as an Electricity Retailer, which they are not.
But buying Solar City might pave that way..

cizuk | 10 July 2016

@shaunbentley - 'It's also not practical to use only supercharger network in the UK if you only have Model 3 range.'
Model 3 range is 215+ miles - plenty for using the Supercharging network
There are few places in the UK you can't go with it
And with the network expanding, those places will get fewer.

shaunbentley | 10 July 2016

@cizuk - I take your point, but areas in Scotland for example could be tricky without using Ecotricity.

I may have struggled expressing concern over Ecotricity's price point, which was my intention, together with questioning how it may stunt and set back EV growth in the UK.

bb0tin | 10 July 2016

@Ross
They can charge by time

glennjturner | 10 July 2016

@shaunbentley

Just driven all round Scotland. Glasgow, Edinburgh, Braemar, Loch ness, Fort Augustus, Fort William, Inverness. No issues while in a Tesla. Plenty of chargers. I think there are more superchargers coming to Scotland soon too.

Badbot | 10 July 2016

Leave GB we did they have over charged/taxed for millennium.
call your relocation brexit.

vitzpatel | 11 July 2016

I don't see the need to use motorway charge points that often. Charging at home will always give you c172 miles of range (based on what I understand 80% of the minimum 215 mile EPA range) which should easily cover you for most trips.

It's only going to a be a rare occasion that you'll need to charge away from home. They'll be more destination chargers and superchargers by the time Model 3 comes to the shores of Blighty. Plus we don't know what the price model will be for supercharging.

The best guess for when Model 3 will be arriving here in late 2018 (I hope) and up until we know more confirmed details (at the second Model 3 event) there's isn't too much point stressing about what may or may not be the case.

jdanielp_uk | 11 July 2016

Ecotricity is clearly looking to encourage more customers to switch to them with their new pricing approach to charging, but anyone that is serious enough about environmental issues to use an electric car should surely be willing to pay a bit more for greener energy anyway? I'm currently with Good Energy, but will consider switching back to Ecotricity for the 3.

Tesla and Ecotricity have a bit of history so it will be interesting to see how the rivalry continues:
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/apr/06/tesla-loses-latest-b...

glennjturner | 12 July 2016

Electricity have just changed the cost due to public feedback.

It is now 30 minutes and cost £6.

jdanielp_uk | 12 July 2016

That is a strange decision to make it even more expensive (albeit a better price per-minute, not that it sounds like that has anything to do with how much energy is actually provided to the car!) whilst also reducing the throughput at their chargers.

Ecotricity aren't new to strange decisions: part of the reason that I switched from them to Good Energy was in protest at their (well, Dale Vince's...) decision to donate half a million pounds to, as they put it, 'Green' Labour and a paltry amount to the actual Green party prior to last year's General Election despite the incredulity of a fair number of their customers.

Tstolz | 12 July 2016

I'm not surprised at all by the cost. High speed charging equipment & high-power standby electricity cost is expensive! Personally I don't have a problem paying for this service ... the convenience of being able to quickly charge is worth it. It's not like you'd ever use it for regular charging. Think of power level as being regular vs premium ... you pay for what you get ... in this case speed.

RJT85 | 13 July 2016

@shaunbentley - Ecotricity really isn't an issue - as glennjturner confirms. As well as Tesla's superchargers, there are plenty of other non-ecotricity chargers across the UK. Also, I've never yet stayed at a hotel that couldn't provide some form of power to the car park. Even if it's a three pin plug, you'll get a decent charge overnight.

@mike83. Thank you for your concern. Despite what the politicians and big business men told us would happen, the economy hasn't collapsed - the FTSE index is now a significantly higher than it was before the vote, the pound is recovering despite some people's attempts to talk it down and if the increase in house prices slows down a bit, most people will welcome it. No sign of the sky falling in or the four horsemen of the apocalypse riding across London Bridge :-)

bj | 13 July 2016

£6 per charge is approx 8 USD. If Tesla Supercharging is USD 2000 for a "lifetime" then Supercharging is more expensive than these PAYG rates if you use it less than 250 times.

If you own a car for 5 years, that means to get value for money you'd need to Supercharge every week. If you own a car for 10 years, every 2 weeks. Based on my current driving patterns and home charging, I would likely Supercharge less than 10 times per year. It would take me more than 25 years to come out in front.

Based on that, Supercharging is far more expensive than third party PAYG options.

Hi_Tech | 13 July 2016

I'm still questioning the 15-50 mile range for £5. What is the charge rate/speed of the "fast chargers" we are talking about? Now apparently £6 for 30 mins, so more than 15-50 range. If it's anything remotely close to Tesla's SC network (120KWh max) I'd expect about at least about 60Kwh rate of charge. Which means you should be able to get roughly 25-30Kwh of energy in 30 mins. That's half of the full charge. Should be enough for about 100 miles in 30 mins. Therefore, your average is closer to £1 for 16 miles of charge.

In the OP's example, you are talking about £1 for 10miles of fueling when fueling ICE cars.

Also, as others have mentioned, you'll rarely use anything but Tesla's SC network... though, I don't know what the plan will be for Model 3 users of SC network.

Linemanap | 17 July 2016

Cant you just plug in at an rv park 50amp plug or any plug for that matter i dont see it as a problem for me and i live in the middle of nowhere. Sounds like the UK has chargers all over. My math gas 2.50 a gallon for 22 miles per gallon. Electric coop rate 17c a kwh 8c off peak. So around $12 for 70kwh or 5.60 off peak so yes 25 pounds for 50 miles is a total rip off and i don't see how they can justify it dig deeper and I'll bet you find an oil company pulling some strings. Thats how it would work in the US anyway. I will use super charging once a month at most so I refuse to pay 2000$ for a life time of unlimited charging but I think paying five times what tesla is paying for the electric bill would be a great deal for the times i need it

Tstolz | 18 July 2016

The equipment and standby power costs to fast charge are higher than slow charging. A wall outlet supplying 120 volts and 15 amps costs nothing basically ... a fast charger supplying 400 volts at 300 amps is an entirely different thing! You pay for speed.

Linemanap | 18 July 2016

My point was you can charge in a lot of other places if you don't want to pay the high price of of these UK chargers. And I don't understand why people are so worried about charging

SamO | 18 July 2016

@Linemanap,

There are many places to charge and Ecotricity has zero chance of sustaining itself charging usurious rates for a "product" that is virtually EVERYWHERE and there is no differentiation, other than speed. Which Ecotricity doesn't provide.

@Tstolz,

A wall outlet supplying 120 volts cost $.17/kW, the same as from a Superchargers. In fact, 120V is less efficient that fast charging and would cost ~2x the cost of 240V or Supercharging at 400V.

jdanielp_uk | 22 July 2016

Tesla is now actively supporting Good Energy by sharing their £100 EV drivers' discount offer in the July Updates email: http://mkto.teslamotors.com/dc/Ypwn0RAOke1M6mf92qmg3vOSzXZ8yMldKJGwd3HXF...

bj | 23 July 2016

@SamO - see my post above showing that Supercharging becomes more expensive than Ecotricity if you use Supercharging less than 250 times over your "lifetime". Which I suspect would be the case for many people based on driving stats. Does that mean Tesla is charging "usurious rates" for Supercharging?

SamO | 24 July 2016

@bj,

Sorry, but it doesn't show anything of the sort. You made several unfortunate assumptions. The first is that you can get a full charge in 30 minutes.

The second is that Supercharging will cost Model 3 $2000.

GIGO (Garbage in, Garbage out)

bj | 24 July 2016

@SamO - my assumptions were clearly stated, it's only garbage if we know it to be wrong, and we don't know that it's wrong that SC for Model 3 will be $2000. It might be wrong, but we don't know it's wrong. I'll happily redo my calculations once we know what it is.

As to whether you can get a full charge in 30 minutes, that's a minor factor in my view. You won't get a full charge from zero in 30 minutes even using SC. Charging rapidly slows down after 80%. So that practical difference in % charge achieved between SC for 30 minutes and Ecotricity for 30 minutes might not be significant in the calculation of "value". If it makes, say, a 20% difference in charge level, then at best my estimate of 250 trips to SC is only moderated down to 200 trips which is still a large number. And the value is not so much the total amount of electricity you are getting for your money, but whether the charge is enough to get you to your destination.

You can do your own sensitivity analysis under a range of assumptions - and my point remains entirely valid.

The point is SC is not necessarily cheap and certainly not free. There will be plenty of scenarios where SC will not make financial sense for the purchaser (provided there are alternative third party charging options in your country of residence).

So to accuse any third-party charging provider of "usurious rates" is to pretend that the same economics don't apply to SC, and that under quite realistic assumptions of use and value, SC can in fact be more "usurious".

SamO | 24 July 2016

@bj,

It's not $8 per charge. It's $8/30 minutes.

At 31 minutes it's $16.

Ecotricity chargers are (max) 50kW which means you may need to stay even longer than an hour to charge full from empty due to taper.

And that's just a small battery Model 3. With a 100kW Model S, that's 2 hours or $32.

I will reiterate: Garbage in Garbage Out

bj | 25 July 2016

@SamO - you don't get it. It's a scenario, based on paying $8 for 30 minutes. Let's take even more pessimistic assumptions as part of the sensitivity analysis to make SC look better. Assume SC "for life" for Model 3 costs only $1000. Few predict it will actually be that low, but let's go with it.

Further assume that at best, the Ecotricity PAYG option is no better "value" than 40% of the electrons pumped in compared to SC in 30 minutes (mind you, that might still be plenty to get you to your destination, so you might not care much). It still means that you'd need to visit SC at least 50 times for it to be better value. For motorists like myself who would need SC only 3 to 4 times per year, it is still a marginal financial proposition even under advantageous assumptions in favour of SC and owning the car for something like 15 years.

That's the whole point of a sensitivity analysis - what is the envelope of possibilities and what do you have to believe in order to decide to take one course of action over another.

If SC for Model 3 is $1000 or less I would probably take it, because I am a rational human being who makes rational financial decisions based on my driving needs. If SC for Model 3 is PAYG I would definitely sign up. If SC for Model 3 is more than $1000 I would need to research the rollout and charges of third-party DCFCs in my country of residence to make a sound decision. If it is $2000 or more, there is almost no scenario where it would represent value and for me to take it up would be a donation to Tesla.

I've put up my assumptions for a sensitivity analysis - what are your assumptions and what's your mathematical conclusion? What have you got to prove me wrong? Bleating GIGO is neither debate nor analysis.

SamO | 25 July 2016

@bj,

First: I assume that you'll have to return home, not just take a trip in a single direction which means you need to double your assumed visits for each trip.
Second: I also assume that each "trip" may not be a single charger visit.
Third: I assume that you will have to stay at least twice as long at an ecotricity charger since Superchargers are 135kW vs 50kW at Ecotricity.
Fourth: I assume that only the smallest battery M3 will require a Supercharging activation fee.
Fifth: I assume that that fee will be between $1000 and $2000.
Sixth: I assume it will be closer to $1000, since my S60 Supercharger activation was $2000 and the M3 will have a smaller battery and will be 20-30% more efficient (250Wh/m).
Seventh: I assume that each Ecotricity visit will deliver (max) 25kW for $8 in 30 minutes.

bj | 25 July 2016

@SamO - let me address those one by one.

The comparison is the total number of trips to SC needed to make it financially more advantageous compared to an alternative where each charge stop is 30 minutes. The de-rating factor for the alternative (my scenarios so far were between 20% de-rating and 60% de-rating) is the mathematical way of saying you might need to visit the alternative more frequently to get an equivalent result. Hence I don't "need to double your assumed visits for each trip" because the alternative has already been de-rated for that possibility.
Same.
Same.
We don't know that yet, but of course if a higher capacity M3 has supercharging included, and there is no way to de-include it, then the financial decision is a different one, as would be the metrics to evaluate it. It would come down to the purchaser's decision of the perceived value of the larger battery pack &/or dual motors.
Time will tell. That price range would make my decision the hardest if DCFC charger costs in my country were comparable to Ecotricity (currently, DCFCs in my country are free to use, but it may not stay that way by the time my M3 arrives). For others, it might be an easy decision, if they expect to use SC a lot more than I would (e.g. they expect to visit SC way more than 50 times in a "lifetime"). That's the whole point of a sensitivity analysis - find out at which point option A becomes more expensive than option B for your circumstances.
Time will tell. I make no prediction as to what it might be, all I have done is analyse a range of possibilities and see what effect it has on the economics.
Yes, hence the de-rating.

I haven't factored in that Ecotricity electricity customers can use the DCFC network for "free", so the equation would obviously be different for people in that situation.

I don't live in the UK so my scenarios are for illustration. All I would like to see is people admit that a one-off lifetime SC payment isn't always a cost-effective financial decision, and that under quite realistic driving scenarios, a one-off SC payment is decidedly un-economic, "usurious" even, to use your word. There are many scnearios where PAYG would be the only economically sensible option for a BEV driver to take up.

Tiebreaker | 25 July 2016

Well, if there is a PAYG option with third-party providers, then we may assume that there will be an additional cost to pay for the supercharging hardware installed in your car.

You get it for free to use it with the Tesla superchargers. Part of the hardware cost, RnD, software etc is recovered from the supercharging fee, be it $2000, built into the price, or otherwise. So it is not just the electricity used for charging.

SamO | 25 July 2016

@Tiebreaker,

+1

Ecotricity doesn't have any hardware, RnD, software etc in their chargers.

Just a third party off the shelf charger and an electrical connection.

@bj,

Nice try.

4 trips/year x $16/charge x 2 charges each way x 2 ways = $256 = Supercharging free for life is a better value in 4-8 years. Any additional trips make the payoff for that unusual driver shorter.

But wait . . . if you finance Supercharging in the purchase of the car, then it's ~$15/month.

But wait . . . when you sell the car, you get a portion of the Supercharging fee back in the residual price.

When Ecotricity raises prices, then the payoff is shorter.

GIGO

bj | 25 July 2016

@SamO - I can't quite work out what your issue is. You seem offended at any suggestion that SC is not value for money. So let's take the most extreme example. I pay for supercharging access, let's say $1500, and use it once in my lifetime. Then my one charge has cost me $1500, compared to a "usurious" $8 at Ecotricity, which I also use once as the alternative in this scenario (heck make it twice even). Which option do you think is financially better value in this situation?

There exist scenarios in which SC will be more expensive than an alternative, and all we are discussing is the feasible range of SC visits at which that crossover occurs. I think that is something useful to estimate and assists rational decision making. The crossover point might be low (ie. SC is financially better only after a few visits) or it might be high to the point of absurdity (e.g. need to visit SC over 2000 times) or anywhere inbetween, depending on the costs of the alternative and individual driving patterns.

I am saying that a financial crossover point exists under any scenario. You seem to be implying that it never exists, or that it is so low as to not be material. I think that position (if it is your position), is neither rational or defensible.

SamO | 26 July 2016

"You seem to be implying that it never exists, or that it is so low as to not be material."

Finally we agree.

Tstolz | 26 July 2016

@Sam0 - you are of course correct that charging at a higher voltage is more economical ... it just isn't much of a factor compared to other costs however ... about 20 cents on a fill. L1 will be great to have everywhere cars park! L2 will be great to have at hotels and malls when you park 4+ hours. L3 will be great to have for when traveling long distances near restaurants to get you going an hour or less.

SamO | 26 July 2016

@Tstolz,

Agreed. High speed charging isn't necessary and may be overkill in most locations. Hence Tesla's comittment to an "order of magnitude" greater Destination Charging vs Supercharging.

Both are great, with slightly differing use cases.

bj | 26 July 2016

@SamO - we don't agree, because a belief that SC with an upfront one-off payment will ALWAYS be a more economical choice compared to any PAYG model is an utterly indefensible and illogical position. You didn't even acknowledge the bookend case of visiting SC once means a charge cost of c.$1500 compared to Ecotricity's $8, and that scenario is economically in Ecotricity's favour. Most people wouldn't take long to decide that $8 or $16 or even $100 is a more economical option than $1500. Perhaps you just could not manage to admit that in low-usage cases SC costs would be "usurious".

For many users, including myself, there will be an economic crossover point which is material to the decision I will have to make as to whether to take up SC or not, no matter how much you pretend that a material crossover point does not exist. I'm certainly not so arrogant as to believe my driving patterns are typical (hence projecting my personal experience as being the measure by which everything should be judged), but they are certainly not unusual. I drive on average less than 10,000 km per year. I know people who drive less than 5000 km per year. I also know people who drive more than 20,000 km per year. A crossover point exists for all of them.

If your position was correct, then no third party charging provider would offer PAYG, as they would have all economically modelled it as an inferior customer proposition to a one-off up-front charge. Since they have financial skin in the game, they must be confident they are right, as their very business viability depends on it. The fact that no third-party charging provider that I know of offers a one-off lifetime payment as an option says a lot. Do you think they would be more successful if they did offer it? What do you know that they don't?

The current Tesla model for SC will work for a portion of people. PAYG will work for another portion of people. My scenario modeling reinforces that and I've never suggested otherwise. But behaving like a denialist and refusing to accept that PAYG can ever be an entirely rational financial and business model which will work for many people is simply extraordinary.

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