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Has there ever been any serious discussion on using the Northwestern University battery when available?

Has there ever been any serious discussion on using the Northwestern University battery when available?

A couple a years ago Northwestern University announced it had invented a new design on the lithium ion battery that due to eternal engineering it would get 10 times the range and recharge 10 times faster than today lithium ion batteries. If reports were accurate, recharging a Model-S would take about 10 minutes and would give the Model-S a 2,300 mile range, more than enough battery power to get from Chicago to Los Angeles without needing to recharge the battey. It also blows away the the range of gasoline cars.

The technology could be seen in the marketplace in the next three to five years, the researchers said.

A paper describing the research is published by the journal Advanced Energy Materials.

“We have found a way to extend a new lithium-ion battery’s charge life by 10 times,” said Harold H. Kung, lead author of the paper. “Even after 150 charges, which would be one year or more of operation, the battery is still five times more effective than lithium-ion batteries on the market today.”
- See more at: http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2011/11/batteries-energy-...

What I'm not sure about is whether it will need 10 times as much electricity to completely charge, which would still be perfectly fine or the same amount of electricity as today's lithium-ion batteries, which will mean "fuel costs" gets down to the gas equivalent of pennies per gallon seen in a slightly higher electric bill as opposed to between $3 and $4 dollars per gallon.

stuey81 | August 15, 2013

i would imagine it would would be implying it could hold 10 times as much capacity in the same storage area, with the added bonus of 10 x faster recharge.....i would imagine it has to do with the anode and cathode being "3d" on the nano scale - my thoughts anyway

Brian H | August 15, 2013

No free miles, 10X the charge.

"eternal engineering"? This I gotta see.

And Teslas run at an equivalent of 0.30 to $1 / gallon depending on power charges.

Here's a more recent article, accessible if you have an institutional affiliation or want to pay for it:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adma.201301530/full

Timo | August 15, 2013

Capacity of those drops fast initially: after 100 cycles it's just about 4/3 of normal graphite anode, and that's just anode, not the full battery.

OTOH 100 cycles is something like 40000 miles with those and after that it loses capacity rather slowly.

Brian H | August 15, 2013

4/3 is a drop?

Timo | August 15, 2013

Yes, initial capacity is much higher, more than double IIRC.

Energy_Freedom | August 16, 2013

No free miles, 10X the charge.

"eternal engineering"? This I gotta see.

And Teslas run at an equivalent of 0.30 to $1 / gallon depending on power charges.

Free miles would be a bonus thinking there were 2 possibilities on how the Northwestern University works:

- Either it increases the storage capacity for similar sized batteries 10 fold

- or it makes a similar sized battery 10 times more efficient.

If its the later then equipped with this battery, Tesla cars would get the equivalent of .03 cents a gallon fuel expense. But even is its still .30 cents a gallon cost equivalent to recharge, having a 2,300 mile range is still a major breakthrough.

Vawlkus | August 16, 2013

Tesla uses proven tech. As soon as this gets proven in industry, they'll start using it. Not 'till then.

Timo | August 16, 2013

Ten times more efficient when efficiency is already 98+% would be bit under 2% improvement.

Also it isn't tenfold increase in capacity. That's just marketing talk comparing this new tech to something old saying it is current tech. Even getting the theoretical max from Silicon you could not get tenfold improvement over best current batteries. Not anymore.