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Less CO2, Yeah, But Also Less Heavy Metal Contamination!

Less CO2, Yeah, But Also Less Heavy Metal Contamination!

I hear a lot about lower CO2 emissions, but nothing about lower heavy metal contamination … and we should!

In many places, the largest contributor to heavy metal contamination (PM10) in storm water systems is from the metal in car brakes. While this has been partially addressed by watching what types of metals are now used in brakes, it is still an issue.

Think about how many brake pads on your ICE car had to be replaced. With 1 billion cars in the world with a replacement every 50K miles equates to about 1.6 billion brake pads every year (8 per car once every 5 years) ... about 100,000 cubic meters of PM10 contaminates or about 1,000 semi-trailers full of PM10. Guess where all the brake pad material went? Onto roads and then down storm drains, and then …

I rarely have to use the brakes in the Tesla because of Regenerative Braking. And, when I do, the braking is lighter because of the regenerative assist. Less and light braking means less PM10 contamination.

So why don’t I hear about this in Tesla brochures. Less CO2. Less PM10 contamination!

David N | April 8, 2019

Emissions you can see and smell, brake pad material? Out of sight out of mind.

SCCRENDO | April 9, 2019

CO2 emissions are likely the bigger problem. But it would be useful if OP could find us some info on how polluting car brakes are.

andy.connor.e | April 9, 2019

Wonder how many micro rubber particles there are from all the tires wearing down. Wonder where all that rubber goes.

MitchP85D | April 9, 2019

Goes back to the earth from which it came.

andy.connor.e | April 9, 2019

ya thats a nice thought, but synthetically created materials are not naturally occurring.

TeslaTap.com | April 9, 2019

Actually, I'd expect metal contaminated oil that drips from most ICE cars to be far worse than brake dust. The oil is either burned or drips, and both cases seem bad.

MitchP85D | April 9, 2019

Synthetic or not, it still chemically reacts and degrades. Think of rust as an example.

andy.connor.e | April 10, 2019

Thats a horrible example. Rust is the result of iron and oxygen. Tire rubber is the result of more than 2 elements being combined in a factory, which without the factory, are not naturally occurring.

"Synthetic or not, it still chemically reacts and degrades. Think of rust as an example." Is not a scientific statement, and it means nothing.

SCCRENDO | April 10, 2019

@andy. Just a hint. It’s not possible to discuss science with Mitch. He is illiterate.

andy.connor.e | April 10, 2019

Could/should just delete this thread then. Hes the only one continuing to argue.

SCCRENDO | April 10, 2019

Its up to the OP. But I would delete the thread if it was mine