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Most cost-efficient way to charge

Most cost-efficient way to charge

My supercharging expired, I found it's pretty expensive to charge, around $20 each time. It's catching up with gas. :)

I wonder what's the most cost-efficient way to charge.

Also I found there are some destination charging station next to supercharging at Santana Row. Anyone knows what's price rate?

Thank you!

gballant4570 | September 3, 2019

I don't think I could get $20 worth of supercharging into my car.....my last stop added 100 miles, cost was $5. The most cost efficient way to charge is at home. I pay 12 cents per kwh there.

M3phan | September 3, 2019

Home charging during off peak hours, if you have that available, I pay 5¢/kWh off peak.

spuzzz123 | September 3, 2019

Don’t charge past 75-80% if you can. The last 20-25% are the most expensive

liantics | September 3, 2019

Look for free chargepoint chargers near someplace you want to spend time, such as a restaurant or mall.

vincelorto | September 3, 2019

This is free too but it might cost you something in the end: https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a28524175/tesla-owner-steals-electrici...

bjrosen | September 3, 2019

Put in a Level 2 charger and charge at home, that will always be cheaper than a supercharger and it's also better for your battery.

Kevin.Tesla | September 3, 2019

Thanks for the tips everyone!

vincelorto, your post is very entertaining. :)

vincelorto | September 3, 2019

The cheapest and with most cost up front is adding solar panels to your home. Your next best option is switching your charging option at home to your electric company's "Time of Use" preference. In San Diego and SDGE, they prefer after 9 PM and I believe it's 9 cents per kilowatt hours. This is compared to the super charger rate of around 31 cents. So you would charge for about 1/3 as the super charger but only if you sign up for the program. They'll hit you for 55 cents from between 4-9 PM though. All these numbers are estimates though. I don't know the exact costs and it also depends on who your electric company is.

Teslanene | September 3, 2019

@kevin were you supercharging the whole time you had it free?

mrburke | September 3, 2019

Work for an employer who provides free EV charging.

Kevin.Tesla | September 3, 2019

@Teslanene, yeah, I usually have a latte break when I supercharge M3. :)

DanO. | September 3, 2019

Charging at home with Time of Use billing is good. Even better if it is available is Demand billing, assuming you can control your peak demand. My overnight rate between 9pm and 9am is 3¢/kWh. It is critical though that you can manage your demand because the summer peak period demand charge is about $15/kW peak per month.

What would be really great is if the car was able to monitor the household demand and control it own charging to optimize your utility bill. I believe the Tesla already has the hardware necessary to query modern utility power meters. Maybe we will get this in a future software update.

beaver | September 3, 2019

Move to fire or hurricane areas for FUSC

Or just charge at home L2 overnight with a TOU plan ($0.13 per kWh in LA for me).

gwolnik | September 3, 2019

Charging at home should be everyone's right. I think California passed a law forbidding HOAs from banning EV charges, but they don't have to install them yet. However, a townhouse or condo owner can add one to their reserved parking space if they pay for it. So far, renter's don't have any rights, but if enough request that, apartment buildings will start adding them. In addition to tax incentives, there are non-profits that will subsidize the installation.

Joseb | September 3, 2019

Home

kelder | September 3, 2019

Live in a condo with a separate garage whose power is paid for by the association; charging is free until they catch on.

Have your office install a NEMA 14-50 outlet for you to use, free of charge.

That's my plan at least...

kevin_rf | September 4, 2019

If you can get a second meter, A TOU plan is the best way to go. That way your home can enjoy the regular rate, and your Tesla can get it's special overnight discount rate.

Wow SDGE's TOU 55 cents peak is steep. My (Sterling Municipal) on peak is 30 cents if I exceed 500. Kwh peak in a given billing cycle. Otherwise it's 18 cents. The off peak is 9.5 cents when I factor everything (technically 1.5 cents before delivery, surcharges, ECT.) .

gmr6415 | September 4, 2019

At home is most likely your best choice if doable. Where I am we don't have any rate changes depending on demand (for now). It's almost always hot here, so I charge at night to avoid losses due to excessive battery cooling during charging.

Earl and Nagin ... | September 4, 2019

Move to Houston, TX where electricity is free at night with some plans.

dmastro | September 4, 2019

Cheapest is a free charger at work.

Effopec | September 4, 2019

Typically I say that charging at home is 1/4 what gas would be (I have a plan that is about $0.105/kWhr all the time). And supercharging is about 1/2 what gas would cost. Now that is for a typical 25 mpg car. If you match the performance of the 3 you are probably much lower than that, so the savings are much greater.

LostInTx | September 4, 2019

@Earl and Nagin, exactly. - my plan with TXU provides free electricity from 9:00 pm to 6:00 am, every day. During the day, when nobody is home, the rate is 15.9 kWh. I charge my 3 starting at 12:30 am.

I've had this plan for a year now and I suspect TXU will be happy when my contract is up. Between timing the washer, dryer, and dishwasher to run overnight, charging the 3 and dropping the A/C to 66 degrees, I use significantly more electricity during the "free" period than during the day.

On another note, I did a 20 to 286 mile charge at the Austin SC this past Monday - $10.20.

RedPillSucks | September 4, 2019

$20!!!??? Where are you supercharging? The most expensive place I've been charged $8 for me to get a full charge.

droneseudenge | September 4, 2019

Yes I totally agree it is very cost cutting.

Kevin.Tesla | September 4, 2019

I'm at Silicon Valley. I always go to Santana Row for supercharging since I can get a good latte there. My M3 ~50 miles -> ~270 miles cost is ~$18.

I guess it's expensive to live in Bay Area. :)

PhillyGal | September 4, 2019

Home charging, hands down. With the right equipment. (Trickly charging on 110 is less efficient and thus more costly.)

PhillyGal | September 4, 2019

PS - It was "free" to charge our Model S for the first year we had it... my electric bill was lower than the year before because we made some small energy upgrades at home. Worth a try! (Tossed the ancient bar fridge, got more efficient washer/dryer, LED bulbs...)

andy.connor.e | September 4, 2019

I've never actually checked before. Where/how do you check the fluctuating utility rates per kWh based on the time of day?

Syed.Hosain | September 4, 2019

@spuzzz123 "Don’t charge past 75-80% if you can. The last 20-25% are the most expensive"

Not sure I understand this reasonaing - the cost is based on the *energy* provided. The *rate* of providing that energy (yes, slower near the end) is not measured and charged for ... unless you stay past the full point (when the $1/min for occupying the stall kicks in).

andy.connor.e | September 4, 2019

+1 @Syed

Charging above 80% slows down yes, but the current slows down. So the amount of energy into the battery slows down. Same thing happens when below 20%.

Syed.Hosain | September 4, 2019

@dmastro "Cheapest is a free charger at work."

Yeah ... my employer provides free 4.5 hours of Chargepoint charging daily (23 miles/hour or 12 miles/hr at shared stations) to the folks who work here.

This is enough to easily handle our commutes ... although I do have my own Chargepoint account so that I can use the same station when I need more than 4.5 hours.

When I take long-distance personal trips to Southern California, I use the Tesla superchargers along the way (Kettleman City is our favorite). In California, this typically costs $0.32 per kW.

Note that it is not the *total* supercharging cost that is an issue, it is the higher rates here in this state.

Syed.Hosain | September 4, 2019

@Kevin.Tesla "I'm at Silicon Valley. I always go to Santana Row for supercharging since I can get a good latte there. My M3 ~50 miles -> ~270 miles cost is ~$18.

I guess it's expensive to live in Bay Area. :)"

Yeah! :(

A local gambling casino in San Jose (Matrix8) has like five or six Tesla charging stations - 40 Amps each - and these are free for their customers. I sometimes go there for lunch and get about 30 "miles" added in an hour ...

hokiegir1 | September 4, 2019

@Syed and @Andy - @spuzz was likely referring to places where you are charged on time rather than usage. Not every state allows usage charging, so if you are in a time-based location, that last 20% takes a LONG time and will increase the cost substantially.

Syed.Hosain | September 4, 2019

@hokiegir1 "@spuzz was likely referring to places where you are charged on time rather than usage. Not every state allows usage charging, so if you are in a time-based location, that last 20% takes a LONG time and will increase the cost substantially."

Interesting ... Ok.

To me, it seems strange, since different brand/model cars charge at differing rates - let alone at when the level of energy already in the battery is a factor.

andy.connor.e | September 4, 2019

Ya that would also make sense. Or would it make cents?

gaboksi | September 4, 2019

pechanga casino has free charging..... but you end up gambling

RADEAN84 | September 4, 2019

Lucked out on my home purchase a few years ago. Previous owner had installed a nice solar system, paid it off in full, and pumped the rebates back into the house. He also did some welding so he had a 260v50a plug in the garage. That plug provides about 30 mi/hr charge rate. Even without solar, installing a similar plug and having the car charge at the low rate times, typically between 12am-3am, would work well. You'd average about 90 miles charge per night and wouldn't be outside of the lower rate window. Guess it depends how many miles you drive per day.

lbowroom | September 4, 2019

So you can leave Pechanga with free money and a charged car!

CRAIGJFIFTY3 | September 4, 2019

On Long Island the rates for SC is $.28/kwh. 50 mi-291mi = about $15. Home electric rate is $.17/kwh. I figured that charging at home would cost half as much per mile as my 2010 Prius. Not counting my solar. I'm installing a HPWC before I use up my free SC miles.

droneseudenge | September 5, 2019

Lucked out on my home purchase a few years ago. Previous owner had installed a nice solar system, paid it off in full, and pumped the rebates back into the house. He also did some welding so he had a 260v50a plug in the garage. That plug provides about 30 mi/hr charge rate. Even without solar, installing a similar plug and having the car charge at the low rate times, typically between 12am-3am, would work well. You'd average about 90 miles charge per night and wouldn't be outside of the lower rate window. Guess it depends how many miles you drive per day.

hahaha i agree!!
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Maxxer | September 5, 2019

At work, it’s free.

Earl and Nagin ... | September 5, 2019

@dmastro and @maxxer,
Its probably ok to gloat about that here, however, I highly recommend you show appreciation or that could go away.

Atoms | September 5, 2019

I only charge at Superchargers on long trips. The rest is done at night in the garage when the power is $0.07/kwh on a TOU plan.

Kevin.Tesla | September 8, 2019

Finding updates at Bay Area. Hope it helps.

1. Supercharging rate is different, e.g. Santana Row 0.31/kWh; Los Gatos 0.28/kWh...
2. Free destination charge is everywhere, e.g. Many stations at Santana Row next to supercharge, ~25 miles/hr if you have shopping to do
3. If you don't have PGE EV plan, don't charge at home, it's more expensive than supercharging. ~0.33/kWh
4. PGE EV plan rate can be as low as 0.13/kWh (different plan has different rate)

jimglas | September 9, 2019

how can posting this crap be worth the time to do it
Nobody is going to click on your spam link Mr abeer
flagged

slingshot18 | September 9, 2019

The question should be what is the most environmentally safe way to charge. All ways are cheaper than gas. So at this point, it shouldn't be driven by economics. It should be driven by where you're getting your electricity. I try to charge during the day off my solar.

Earl and Nagin ... | September 9, 2019

@slingshot18,
It's almost true that "all ways are cheaper than gas". California peak rates (~$0.45/kWhr) make peak electricity almost as much as gas depending on the car you're comparing with.
However, any source of electricity is also as good or better environmentally than gas.
Therefore, its reasonable to take economic sustainability into account as well as environmental sustainability. If someone stretches their budget to afford the premium (today) for an EV, it is fair for them to subsidize their higher car costs by looking at cheaper electricity, even if that electricity may not be the most environmental.
I'll also add that, if I charge on cheap electricity at night and that electricity is cheap because it only uses the fixed gas and coal infrastructure but that enables me to put solar on my house, that is also an ecological win.
Many ways to work it with an EV and they are all good!

gballant4570 | September 9, 2019

If you live on the East Coast, central Atlantic.... and can get power from Constellation..... I signed up for 100% renewable supply. Price is 9.2 cents/kwh, plus about 2.5 cents/kwh for BG&E to "bring it to me", 24/7. In this part of the country its all wind generated.
I am sure there are similar deals available from other sources as well. My renewable power contract reduced my price by 2 cents. Supercharging in this area isn't that high either - I don't know the exact rate, but it came out to about 15 cents/kwh at the Supercharger.

kevin_rf | September 10, 2019

Are these SC's by the minute and not by the kwh? That seems to good to be true. Wow.