Forums

94 Year Old Man Paves Way To Next Gen Battery Tech

94 Year Old Man Paves Way To Next Gen Battery Tech

I was going to add a comment to an existing post regarding one of the better articles covering the breakthrough of a solid state electrolyte for Lithium batteries. But in searching this forum not finding one. ?

This has been widely reported, but for anyone who hasn't heard the news, the inventor of the lithium battery, 94 year-old John Goodenough, recently announced a successful prototype of a solid-state electrolyte based cell that could leapfrog over existing liquid electrolyte based lithium-ion cells in at least five important areas:

1) Dramatically increased energy density (range)
2) Dramatically reduced charging times (minutes instead of hours)
3) Greatly increased life-cycles (should last my lifetime)
4) Greatly increased operating temperature range (below 0F)
5) Elimination of fire hazard (no more smoking craters)

Here's the article: spectrum.ieee org/energywise/energy/renewables/.WMIOMw1XI8U.gmail

(Sorry JR, sometimes the monkeys don't like links from non-owners unless you put a space in)

Carl Thompson | April 1, 2017

Articles about some revolutionary innovation that will make batteries dramatically better pop up extremely frequently. And they almost never pan out. Best to talk about this when and if it's closer to reality (10 years? More?)

Carl

EaglesPDX | April 1, 2017

up

nyca | April 2, 2017

This topic was recently covered on a NOVA episode about battery technology.

nyca | April 2, 2017

Can't post a link, look for the PBS NOVA show titled "Search for the Super Battery".

carlk | April 2, 2017

Elon famously commeted on new battery technology: "Don't show me the powerpoint. Show me the sample". You can imagine every inventor will try to sell the invention to the largest battery user in the world Tesla. Elon's point is a practical battery needs to passed all requirements instead of improvements in only one or two areas. The list in your op still miseed the most important one, the cost, even if the rest are all true.

msofsd | April 2, 2017

Tesla may well be the beginning of the era of the EV and the eventual end of the ICE. IF this invention pans out, I think it will "seal the deal" and tremendously speed the changeover.

noleaf4me | April 2, 2017

It will happen. Just think where battery technology was 15 years ago versus today -- no comparison. Almost weekly there is another story about advanced battery technology -- one of them will be a leap.

The breakthrough will come -- we have to momentum now to develop the technology.

Coastal Cruiser. | April 2, 2017

The thing that impressed me was that this breakthrough comes from the guy who invented the battery Tesla is using now (in a modified form of course).

bmalloy0 | April 2, 2017

@CC: is it really that hard to believe? I mean, it IS really impressive that he's still doing research (at all) at his age, but given that, he's arguably the person who understands Lithium-based batteries the most on the planet.

Coastal Cruiser. | April 2, 2017

I don't find it hard to believe at all! That's why i posted the article. :>

msofsd | April 3, 2017

The improvements to lithium batteries up to this point have been evolutionary, relatively small steps. If this battery proves itself, it will be revolutionary and probably change the automobile industry. I'm keeping my fingers crossed!

Frank99 | April 3, 2017

Having a glass (rather than liquid) electrolyte is the revolution. Others have been working on solid electrolytes for years, but nothing has really panned out - it'll be interesting to see if this does.

This change could take Lithium batteries from being somewhat touchy but energy dense to being extraordinarily robust, even more energy dense, and chargeable in minutes rather than hours. It means that Solar can provide 100% of energy needs, when matched with a battery safe enough, dense enough, cheap enough, with sufficient charge/discharge cycles to plan a 20 year plant lifetime.

Unfortunately, they don't know how many charge cycles it'll last, and they haven't figured out a good cathode (1 of the 3 major components of a battery). So, it's a breathless story about a unique breakthrough in batteries, but it's a breakthrough that is still in the lab. It goes on the stack of other stories about battery breakthroughs that might be ready for production use in 10 years.

Red Sage ca us | April 8, 2017

If my vague remembrance of 10th Grade Physics class is correct, glass is technically a liquid. I have seen window panes in old buildings that demonstrate the phenomenon. As if the glass has thinned at the top, succumbing to gravity over the decades, getting holes in it as it thins above, and pooling in apparently melted sludge at the bottom of the frame.

Red Sage ca us | April 8, 2017

Bighorn: Thanks. OK. So, I've added 'amorphous solid' to my personal scientific lexicon. ;-)

Still doesn't change the fact I have personally seen pools of 'melted' glass in window frames of old buildings.

Perhaps some glass manufacturing techniques are just much better than others? Or, it could be the glass I'm speaking of didn't use as high a content of lead or lithium as an additive of the glassblowing process?

janendan | April 8, 2017

Who was it that declared the technology for reusable rockets to be brought back to the same launchpad was just 10 or 20years away? Isn't it about the will and the money? Didn't EM say that SCs were the future? Has anyone seen the Australian RMIT study in Nature on Fractal inspired Laser inscribed Graphene Electrodes? The design expands the Vol. Capacity of current SCs and can laminate underneath SU's 25% efficient tandem perovskite films.
Tessa is all about the will and the money.

topher | April 8, 2017

"Still doesn't change the fact I have personally seen pools of 'melted' glass in window frames of old buildings."

I can't speak to what you saw, but it wasn't glass flowing at room temperatures even over long periods.

Thank you kindly.

EaglesPDX | April 8, 2017

"Who was it that declared the technology for reusable rockets to be brought back to the same launchpad was just 10 or 20years away?"

Robert Goddard in 1911.

Coastal Cruiser. | April 8, 2017

"Still doesn't change the fact I have personally seen pools of 'melted' glass in window frames of old buildings."

I know exactly what you are referring to. My best understanding is that the panes of glass started out life that way. The techniques for making windows were not as refined as now. I think that old glass is rather cool, actually. But I also love extremely dilapidated wood.

"Who was it that declared the technology for reusable rockets to be brought back to the same launchpad was just 10 or 20years away? Isn't it about the will and the money? Didn't EM say that SCs were the future? Has anyone seen the Australian RMIT study in Nature on Fractal inspired Laser inscribed Graphene Electrodes? The design expands the Vol. Capacity of current SCs and can laminate underneath SU's 25% efficient tandem perovskite films. Tessa is all about the will and the money"

Well said.

brando | April 9, 2017

side note: glass is similar to aluminium as there are many alloys of both. Li is added to both, for example.

time to watch Dahn explain Li battery research
https://youtu. be/pxP0Cu00sZs