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Powerwall 2 failure

Powerwall 2 failure

My Powerwall was installed on 4th November but failed one of its installation checks. The installer said it was a firmware issue which would be remotely fixed by Tesla in the next few days. He also said that the customise features would appear on the app in a day or two, which they did. On 8th November the system failed and has been on standby ever since. The installer came and ran its of analytics over two hours and spent an hour on the phone to Tesla. They don't know what's wrong with it.

A month has passed and I've heard nothing more from the installer and nothing at all from Tesla. The battery is completely empty, taking no charge from either the PV or the grid, so I've asked for my money back. I thought these things were supposed to be reliable and trouble-free?

grins.va | December 6, 2019

What state are you located and what is the name of your installation company? Thanks.

postman | December 6, 2019

England
Spirit Energy

gregbrew | December 6, 2019

In the town where I live, the city inspector won't give final sign off on a project of this scope unless it's functioning as intended.

How did you get final approval to operate (called PTO over here) if it didn't work at the time of installation? Did it *ever* function properly? I would not have allowed the installer off the hook with vague promises of a future fix. The installation isn't complete until and unless the equipment operates as promised.

I'm afraid that you're partly at fault here for not doing your due-diligence at the time of installation, and are paying the price now by having to deal with a warranty repair, rather than an initial installation issue.

Can we assume that you've already made your final payment for this faulty equipment? If not, that's the only leverage you've got to work with at this point. You also may want to speak with a lawyer, and have him/her draft a demand letter on their letterhead. That usually gets a quick response.

Good luck!

postman | December 7, 2019

Over here a regulatory approval is required prior to the installation to occur but nothing else.

However I had only paid a deposit of 25% and English Law allows me to cancel the contract and require a full refund if the goods are not fit for purpose.

I’m confident that I’ll get my money back. But surprised that Tesla aren’t interested.

postman | December 7, 2019

Over here a regulatory approval is required prior to the installation to occur but nothing else.

However I had only paid a deposit of 25% and English Law allows me to cancel the contract and require a full refund if the goods are not fit for purpose.

I’m confident that I’ll get my money back. But surprised that Tesla aren’t interested.

Passion2Fly | December 8, 2019

Yeah, I had a few problems also during install, wrong CT polarity, connectors not fully inserted, etc... but I didn’t pay a dime until I was able to verify the full functionality, including a simulated grid failure and charging from solar with the grid down... so far, I’m very happy with the Tesla PW! It’s a great product.

gregbrew | December 9, 2019

My installers tested for Powerwall (PW) full functionality before they left, including shutting off the main to simulate a grid failure, and making sure I could log in to the app. I highly recommend that everyone do this, so any obvious issues can be corrected. The PWs ship about 15% full, so they functioned as expected when the main breaker was flipped. I also shut down and unplugged sensitive electronics before the main was flipped.

Grid failure and recovery is notoriously "noisy", and can damage sensitive electronics, even with a backup like a PW. It all depends on where in the 60Hz wave the power is cut and/or restored. Including sensing and control electronics so that power switching only happens at the 60Hz wave crossover point is challenging, expensive and rarely implemented, especially on (relatively) high power loads like the 5kW a single PW can source.

postman | December 14, 2019

Last Tuesday the Tesla engineer arrived (by appointment) at around 7pm and spent a couple of hours determining that the powerwall was really as broken as it appeared. When he left he said that another Tesla engineer would be along in the next few days with a replacement

On Thursday morning another engineer rang to arrange to be come and do that. He rang back shortly after to cancel saying that Tesla Amsterdam had decide that Spirit Energy of Reading , the installer, should do the work. Obviously I’ve heard nothing from Spirit so far but the clock is ticking on the 14 day statutory notice I gave them.

postman | December 14, 2019

Last Tuesday the Tesla engineer arrived (by appointment) at around 7pm and spent a couple of hours determining that the powerwall was really as broken as it appeared. When he left he said that another Tesla engineer would be along in the next few days with a replacement

On Thursday morning another engineer rang to arrange to be come and do that. He rang back shortly after to cancel saying that Tesla Amsterdam had decide that Spirit Energy of Reading , the installer, should do the work. Obviously I’ve heard nothing from Spirit so far but the clock is ticking on the 14 day statutory notice I gave them.