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For Remnant

For Remnant

We all need to congratulate you on the President of your dreams being elected. With a spineless Republican congress how far wrong can you guys go? I guess we are all grateful that Trumpcare is almost dead in the Senate so millions will not be thrown off healthy insurance in the near future. But isolationaism and anti-foreign bigotry is about to rear its ugly head and severely hurt medical research. It seems likely that other kinds of research such as climate change and facts in general will also suffer. Fake news will rule. I did not link the original article from the Annals of Internal Medicine because only subscribers can access the full article. But here is the Reuters summary.
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-immigration-physicians/us-immig...

Bad news for Welfare_Mitch as well. Trump wants to cut FEMA funding in his budget. There goes his welfare cheese.
http://www.newsweek.com/harvey-trump-fema-budget-disaster-preparedness-h...

Captain_Zap | September 26, 2017

Please! No conjuring!

MitchP85D | September 26, 2017

Captain Planet = Goofy, dumbass, worthless piece of dog poop democrat!
Proof: Captain Planet keeps insisting that my flood insurance claim is an act of lining up for welfare. What an A-hole! Especially when you consider I've paid my flood insurance premiums since 2008. When I got knocked on my ass by getting flooded out of my home, Captain Planet thought he could kick me while I was on the ground. Instead, he just proved what a f*ckin' jerk he is!

I have been advocating the privatization of flood insurance. You don't know what the f-word you are yakin' about when you say "bad news" for me. If Trump gets the NFIP privatized, then bully for him!

By the way Captain Planet, if you want to meet me face to face, I am headed out to Sedona, AZ later this Fall. Certainly a lot closer to your neck of the woods than mine. Send an email to me at rmitchell108@yahoo.com for details on when and where.

SCCRENDO | September 26, 2017

Heading to Zion the end of next month

rxlawdude | September 26, 2017

"I have been advocating the privatization of flood insurance."

Even if it means a rate increase of 1,000% or more. Yeah, I'm sure you're down on that.

MitchP85D | September 26, 2017

You have no idea what my flood insurance premium would be if it was private hellasmarter dude! By the way, I created an account with myflood.com. It shows a record of my payments to NFIP over the past 10 years. My first premium payment was $330 back in 2008. It grew steadily to $425 by 2016. Got the same rate for 2017. Since I flooded, I'm sure the rate will shoot up drastically in 2018.

SCCRENDO | September 26, 2017

@Welfare_Mitch. Yes your premiums will shoot up after you found out you were now in a flood zone. Perhaps we could get your Senator Cruz and of course Trump to get the government to anti up more welfare cheese so your insurance will be be more affordable as we wait for the next severe hurricane. Because of rising sea levels, warmer air and warmer oceans that you deny. Looks like you can ignore climate change, build on wetlands, be a libertarian yet get the government to ante up the welfare cheese.

rxlawdude | September 27, 2017

"You have no idea what my flood insurance premium would be."

Kind of like under the now-dead GOP "healthcare" bill, those with pre-existing conditions will be guaranteed they can get health insurance. However, the price of the policy can be whatever the hell the insurer wants to charge.

Guess what, Mitch? You have a pre-existing condition now. I really do hope you get your wish of non-gubmint-subsidized, private flood insurance. Let us know how the price compares and how happy you are to be part of the "free market."

El Mirio | September 27, 2017

@Mitch there are alternatives to FEMA

http://www.privatemarketflood.com/texas/

MitchP85D | September 27, 2017

Here is a peculiar little statement from the so-called private market site Miriel:

"ONCE YOUR LENDER PAYS YOUR RENEWAL PREMIUM YOU CANNOT CANCEL THE FEMA POLICY."

It is just another pass-through operation. They collect the premium from you to pay FEMA!

MitchP85D | September 27, 2017

Captain Planet, hurricanes aren't the only things that cause floods! The Great Plains floods. The Midwest floods. The East Coast floods. A lot of places across America and the rest of the world floods! Hell, you have mudslides in California! According to your silly standards, anyplace where it rains is a floodplain!

Rising sea levels had nothing to do with my flood. It was the Addicks Reservoir, It filled up from creeks and bayous flowing into it, then it spilled over its banks. That caused my flood. I am about 107 feet above sea level and about 75 miles from the coast. My flood event was more like a Midwest river that flowed over its banks. This is the first time in the 37 years I've lived out here that my neighborhood flooded. You can make that stupid-ass welfare cheese comment of yours over and over again like Goebbels, but you won't get anyone to believe it except for your stupid-ass like minded socialist buddies!

rxlawdude | September 27, 2017

Oh, Mitch. You continuously IGNORE my point that if your flood insurance was covered solely by a private pool of premiums, you either would get pennies on the dollar for your loss, or premiums that will even make YOU blush in anger.

You cannot have your cake and eat it too.

SCCRENDO | September 27, 2017

@Welfare_Mitch. Your buddy Harvey became a lot stronger because of climate change. Because of lax building permits ignoring the environment homes were built on wetlands preventing natural drainage. The Addicks reservoir overflowed because it was flooding below so they couldn't release more water. They also permitted homes behind the reservoir so it overflowed backwards and flooded your home. They should have been smart enough to prevent you building. The above is the end result of climate change denial and eliminating environmental oversight. Both are policies of Republicans and libertarians. But thanks to liberal policies and FEMA you got your welfare cheese instead of relying on the free market to saddle you with exorbitant premiums

MitchP85D | September 27, 2017

Utter horsecrap about Harvey getting stronger because of so-called climate change. Dr. Chris Landsea would tear you a new one if you tried to make that argument in front of him! He is only the Science and Operations Officer of the National Hurricane Center. That's all!

You have absolutely no backing in your stupid-ass statement that home building occurred because of "Republicans and libertarians." Houston has been run by democrats for centuries!

Here, do some homework about FEMA and flood insurance!

https://www.fema.gov/national-flood-insurance-program/How-Buy-Flood-Insu...

See this fact Captain Planet?
Floods can happen anywhere--More than 20 percent of flood claims come from properties outside the high risk flood zone.

I was in that 20 percent that flooded outside the high risk flood zone!!

Got it now ya dumbass a-hole democrat!!!!!!!

SCCRENDO | September 27, 2017

@Welfare_Mitch. Looks like you tore yourself a new one right through your frontal lobes. I know you have trouble with facts particularly scientific ones. I don’t blame you. I think Texas A&M is a failed education system. They took your money and didn’t teach you science. Back in dark Africa we get far more science. Here we go again
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/08/did-climate-change-i...
https://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/global-warming-and-hurricanes/

psusi | September 28, 2017

You do know that the reason that the NFIP exists is because the private insurance industry refuses to write flood insurance right? They won't touch it with a 10 foot pole.

You really need to put the crack pipe down.

MitchP85D | September 28, 2017

Hey Captain Planet, pay attention to the GFDL link you posted:

But statistical tests reveal that this trend is so small, relative to the variability in the series, that it is not significantly distinguishable from zero (Figure 2). In addition, Landsea et al. (2010) note that the rising trend in Atlantic tropical storm counts is almost entirely due to increases in short-duration (<2 day) storms alone. Such short-lived storms were particularly likely to have been overlooked in the earlier parts of the record, as they would have had less opportunity for chance encounters with ship traffic.

Note that the great atmospheric scientist Landsea was mentioned?!!! A student of the late great Dr. Bill Gray!!

Stick that in your pipe and smoke it Captain Planet!

MitchP85D | September 28, 2017

Hey pussi, here is a tidbit of information for you statists. From the good 'ol Reagan era:

"In 1981, the Reagan administration set a goal to make the NFIP self-supporting by 1988. That would mean that no taxpayer support is needed to pay claims and operating expenses. One step toward that goal was a decrease in the amount of subsidy for older buildings. In addition, rates were increased and coverage of certain items in basements was sharply limited. These measures, combined with a number of years without major floods, allowed the NFIP to achieve self-supporting status in 1985, three years before the target date."

Here. Read all about it!

http://water.ky.gov/floodplain/Pages/BriefHistory.aspx

rxlawdude | September 28, 2017

Hey Denier @Mitch
Before 1950 flood insurance was part of the standard homeowners' insurance policy. During the 1950s increasingly high correlation of losses by holders of flood policies of the same company caused many insurance companies to begin excluding flood coverage from standard insurance policies, selling flood insurance separately. Over time, insurance premiums collected were insufficient in covering payouts after major flooding events. In 1968, the National Flood Insurance Act established the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which allows property owners to purchase insurance from the U.S. government that covers certain losses from flooding. This insurance is not set by the market risk valuation. It is less expensive than the private insurance company rate would be. This is accomplished either by the program running a deficit and borrowing money or by subsidies from the national government. Either way, the property owners with NFIP policies are receiving government subsidies to live in areas with high flood risk.

MitchP85D | September 28, 2017

Just because I bought into it doesn't mean I am FOR the program Hellasmarter dude. I bought into it because it was the only flood insurance available to me at the time I first bought it back in 2008!

I was not in a high-risk flood area. How many times do I have to keep telling y'all that??!!!

SCCRENDO | September 28, 2017

@Welfare_Mitch. Agreed. That hurricane severity relates to man's activities is not as yet proven science yet the modelling is strongly supportive. Again you resort to the well known denier argument that unless we have 100% conclusive proof we should ignore it. The modelling is strongly supportive and perhaps if our planners would have taken heed we wouldn't have had to have our tax money covering your welfare cheese. Rather than cherry pick one graph as the source of your denial read the paper in its entirety. I am posting the summary conclusions for your benefit.

"It is premature to conclude that human activities–and particularly greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming–have already had a detectable impact on Atlantic hurricane or global tropical cyclone activity. That said, human activities may have already caused changes that are not yet detectable due to the small magnitude of the changes or observational limitations, or are not yet confidently modeled (e.g., aerosol effects on regional climate).
Anthropogenic warming by the end of the 21st century will likely cause tropical cyclones globally to be more intense on average (by 2 to 11% according to model projections for an IPCC A1B scenario). This change would imply an even larger percentage increase in the destructive potential per storm, assuming no reduction in storm size.
There are better than even odds that anthropogenic warming over the next century will lead to an increase in the occurrence of very intense tropical cyclone in some basins–an increase that would be substantially larger in percentage terms than the 2-11% increase in the average storm intensity. This increase in intense storm occurrence is projected despite a likely decrease (or little change) in the global numbers of all tropical cyclones.
Anthropogenic warming by the end of the 21st century will likely cause tropical cyclones to have substantially higher rainfall rates than present-day ones, with a model-projected increase of about 10-15% for rainfall rates averaged within about 100 km of the storm center."

rxlawdude | September 28, 2017

"Just because I bought into it doesn't mean I am FOR the program Hellasmarter dude."

Just taking the handout. Got it.

SCCRENDO | September 28, 2017

@Welfare_Mitch. You are in a high flood risk area. You just got flooded didn't you? You just failed to recognize that you were in a high risk area because you didn't evaluate that building in wetlands prevents water drainage. You did not accept the prediction that hurricanes become more intense with global warming because there is only a trend that has not been shown to be statistically significant. And you bought a house behind the Addicks reservoir not understanding that reservoirs can overflow and when they do will flood the unprotected homes behind. We are all glad that you did take the precaution of FEMA insurance. But be grateful that FEMA was there for you. So stop trashing others who take government welfare because you were at the front of the line.

rxlawdude | September 28, 2017

And, again, I wish @Mitch the best in his recovery efforts, and am glad the only damage he and his family suffered was property that can be replaced.

Politics? We see things very differently, but that doesn't mean wishing ill on those we disagree with.

MitchP85D | September 28, 2017

According to your logic Captain Planet, anybody who has flooded is automatically in a high risk flood area. But if there is no record of the area of concern flooding in the past, how can you determine if that is a high risk flood zone? You can't! My neighborhood never flooded in the 37 years I've lived here. The house right across the street from me DID NOT FLOOD during the Harvey event. Besides, did you do your homework assignment and look at the FEMA post that explains why you should buy flood insurance, even though you are not in a flood zone? FEMA said that 20+% of flood claims come from areas outside of high risk zones, BECAUSE FLOODS CAN HAPPEN ANYWHERE! Most people who flood outside of a flood zone don't have flood insurance. So, those poor folks are out of pocket to make the repairs.

I am 5 miles away from the Addicks reservoir, upstream to the north. My area never flooded before 29 AUG 2017. This is why NFIP did not have me in a high risk flood area. And this is why my flood insurance premium was so low.

I can tell you snobby liberal elitists in California are pissed off that I had flood insurance. If I didn't, I can tell all of you would be high-fiving it with glee because of my misfortune. But since I did have flood insurance, you have nothing but contempt for me because I actually had the foresight to think about such things that could happen to me. Being a weatherman did give me an advantage. I know that weather is no respecter of what a man draws on a map. Many Houstonians are pissed off because they thought they did not need flood insurance due to living outside a flood zone. Well, they learned a hard lesson. Of all of my neighbors who got flooded, I am the only one who was covered. And I am the only one who has a construction crew replacing my insulation and sheetrock in my neighborhood now. The crew just asked me to move my Tesla and motorcycles out of the garage so they can sheetrock it. I gladly complied with their request!

Something tells me you global warming worshippers are pissed off about that!

MitchP85D | September 28, 2017

Thanks for the well wishes Hellasmarter dude! Believe it or not, that is helpful.

SCCRENDO | September 28, 2017

@Welfare_Mitch. If something happens 1 in a 100 it is low probability. But now that it has happened this has increased your odds to 100% probability that it happened. It does not say anything about the next event. But as of August 29, 2017 you now live in a flood zone.

Captain_Zap | September 28, 2017

What is considered a high risk flood area? We have property zoned in 100 year flood zones, 1000 year flood zones, etc. We have had two 1000 year floods in the past decade. The 100 year floods happen every couple years now. It is wiping out our timber and ag land. Trees that were taken out were hundreds of years old. That never happened until more recent years. It isn't just global warming to blame. Over-logging has a lot to do with it in the valleys and filling or paving in the flatlands or flood plains contribute a bit. Routinely record breaking rains do contribute quite a bit though. Alas, I pay through the nose for earthquake insurance.

SCCRENDO | September 28, 2017

@Captain_Zap. That is teh point we are trying to get through to Mitch. Climate change does seem to increase hurricane intensity. We also got involved in reviewing river flooding and climate change. And it appears that climate change causes some rivers to flood and others to actually have lower levels. This relates to shifts in rainfall and snow melt with changing temps. What we do to the environment in other ways is definitely a factor. Removing trees contribute to climate change, change in rain patterns and soil erosion. And off course in Houston they built on wetlands
https://www.livescience.com/27692-deforestation.html

We discussed the pros and cons of earthquake insurance recently. Only 17 % of Californians carry this. There are mixed reviews with most considering it not to be cost effective. I am one of those who has chosen to risk it. Perhaps I am like the climate change deniers who go through life with blinkers on

Remnant | September 30, 2017

@SCCRENDO (OP, September 26, 2017)

<< For Remnant ... >>

You should not use my name to introduce considerations that lump me and you or your followers together as holders of any opinions, without my specific approval and consent, especially those listed in your OP.

<< I guess we are all grateful that Trumpcare is almost dead in the Senate so millions will not be thrown off [health] insurance in the near future. >>

While I am not happy with the President's failure to abide by his campaign promise of adding free-market elements to his health care plan (such as competition across State lines, policy portability, tax-exemption of medical/health insurance premiums for individuals rather than employers, etc.), I do not share your reason for criticizing his plan, that is, the loss of coverage by the able bodied Americans wrongly and illegally covered under Medicaid by Obamacare. As you should have known, Medicaid was designed to cover only the indigent and the disabled, not people who are able to work.

<< But [isolationism] and anti-foreign bigotry [are] about to rear [their] ugly [heads] and severely hurt medical research. >>

Your English spelling and grammar are getting increasingly atrocious, but this quote is also flawed in its logic and attribution. There is no good reason to conflate isolationism and anti-foreign bigotry and your mis-attributing them to the President, to the AGW contrarians, or to me is wrong and dishonest.

Furthermore, by now we all (that is, other than you) know that what you call "anti-foreign bigotry" is just a mask for the disdain you have for the US Constitution, its principles, and their use to vet immigrants for the American Citizenship.

As to the connection you ignorantly draw between these straw-men of yours and medical research, the American immigration and academic authorities have, with rare exceptions, promoted people of foreign origin into high positions in research, medical or otherwise, on funds from universities, NIH and a variety of grants.

rxlawdude | September 30, 2017

"As to the connection you ignorantly draw between these straw-men of yours and medical research, the American immigration and academic authorities have, with rare exceptions, promoted people of foreign origin into high positions in research, medical or otherwise, on funds from universities, NIH and a variety of grants."

Wow. I don't know how many falsehoods one could cram into one sentence, but the insignificant carpet scrap certainly qualifies for a record with this one.

"American immigration and academic authorities have, with rare exceptions, promoted people of foreign origin into high positions..." Perhaps you have a legitimate source to prove this didn't come from your rectum.

"... with RARE EXCEPTIONS, into high positions in research, medical or otherwise, on funds from universities, NIH and a variety of grants." (emphasis added.)

Again, let's see you back up these bald faced lies with some real facts. We'll wait. But I suppose that, since it's the norm according to you, the white male researcher should be a rarity. Hmmmm.

SCCRENDO | September 30, 2017

@Remnant My apologies. I thought you would be flattered that I started a thread for you. Are you aware that many working individuals did not have medical insurance before Obamacare? Also what happens if someone loses their job while being treated. They cannot even complete their treatment plan, Medical care is a right not a priveledge in a civilized society. When people don’t have insurance they neglect preventitive care and end up in emergency rooms. Diabetics who neglect their diabetes because they cannot afford to visit their doctor or their meds develop costly complications. If someone has an infectious disease like TB should we not treat them? How about vaccinations. Remnant’s USA is not the place where most of us wish to live.

Remnant cut the BS. You are a bigot, particularly against foreigners. Who are you kidding?? You are correct that foreigners have reached high positions in research, universities, the NIH etc. However these are the same people that Trump the Chump is trying to kick out. He is trying to run a country by kicking out and firing the smart ones and let all the unqualified folk take over. Wake up man.

Remnant | October 1, 2017

@SCCRENDO (September 30, 2017)

<< I thought you would be flattered that I started a thread for you. >>

Of course not. I was only surprised.

Everyone here knows my well being is the opposite of your purpose in life.

<< Are you aware that many working individuals did not have medical insurance before Obamacare? >>

Yes, I was, but we must note that most of them were young, able bodied people who CHOSE to be without coverage.

<< Also what happens if someone loses their job while being treated. They cannot even complete their treatment plan, >>

What do you mean? No more personal accountability? No prudential judgment?

Must we provide for the improvident, or for the unwise risk taker? Do you recall the vehicles that fly by you on the free way, at 15-20-30 mph over the speed limit? For one thing, they wind up on public dough any way, for another, we cannot design public policy to plan to care for such freaks.

<< Medical care is a right not a [privilege] in a civilized society. >>

Reviving slavery, aren't you? Some people, by dint of their improvidence, stupidity, undue risk-taking, or sheer defiance of odds become entitled to your services for free? Then, you must be reviled as the promoter of a vicious social order, based on ownership of people or their labor.

<< When people don’t have insurance they neglect [preventive] care and end up in emergency rooms. Diabetics who neglect their diabetes because they cannot afford to visit their doctor or their meds develop costly complications. >>

So what? Why does it seem natural to you that people with little or no coverage should be less cautious about their preventive care? Normal response to insufficient coverage is more not less caution. You must be having some freaks for friends if they respond the careless way you describe.

sabbia | October 1, 2017

@Rem. The Declaration of Independence says that "all men are created equal." You know that they're not and therefore they should rot.

rxlawdude | October 1, 2017

"Must we provide for the improvident, or for the unwise risk taker?"

You just described everyone that lives in flood zones and benefit from federal subsidies. Like someone else who thinks regressively here.

SCCRENDO | October 1, 2017

@Remnant. I need to praise you for your honesty. Just like the president. You say it like you think it is. Unfortunately most of us think these attitudes lack compassion and are real ugly. I guess I have a few questions for you.

If you lost your insurance or had a cancer that required expensive chemotherapy not covered by your insurance what would you do?
Are you going to or have you taken social security at the appropriate age?
If you lived next door to Welfare_Mitch would you have called FEMA in to help you rebuild.
In addition you seemed to have claimed you were a religious man. If true and I am not sure what religion, but I guess not Muslim, have you asked yourself what would Jesus do or what would your Rabbi advise if someone was ill and had no medical insurance or for the flood victims of Puerto Rico???

Remnant | October 1, 2017

@rxlawdude (October 1, 2017)

<< You just described [improvident, unwise risk taker] everyone that lives in flood zones and [benefits] from federal subsidies. >>

Not if the federal benefits are designed to diminish or eliminate the PR vulnerabilities indexed as contributory to the Irma-Maria catastrophe.

The changes I favor are not meant to replace or redesign the populace, but to substitute a more functional and durable infrastructure (IS) for the one destroyed. However, it would not be frivolous to educate the PR populace and technicians properly to manage and repair the new IS.

The perennial corruption, political confusion, and budget deficits of PR will also have to be addressed at some point, but such decisions should be preceded and informed by thorough investigations.

SCCRENDO | October 1, 2017

@ Remnant. I think we are all in agreement that the infrastructure needs to built in a sensible manner. That means following regulations including environmental. I guess dismantling the EPA would not help. Initially I would recommend that the President get off the golf course and stop tweeting insults to the Puerto Ricans and try get electricity restored and emergency supplies in.

MitchP85D | October 1, 2017

According to Hellasmarter Dude's and Captain Planet's logic, anybody living within 75 miles of the coastline from Brownsville, Texas to Cape Cod is in a flood zone!

SCCRENDO | October 1, 2017

@Welfare_Mitch. Thats what climate change will do. Thats the benefit those of us who know science have on you. Don’t you wish you learned science?

Remnant | October 1, 2017

@SCCRENDO (October 1, 2017)

<< I think we are all in agreement that the infrastructure needs to built in a sensible manner. That means following regulations including environmental. I guess dismantling the EPA would not help. >>

EPA shrinkage must be your pet peeve. Not much application to PR though, unless you want EPA to fine everyone in PR for jeopardizing the US waters as they drain the flood water from their homes or for violating the Clean Water Act because of the sewage contamination. Neither has anyone tried to dismantle the EPA in the PR context.

I was not concerned about regulations with regard to replacing the infrastructure, but with the innovation opportunities the PR infrastructure replacement might offer. There are at least four such areas, IMO:
(1) Point-Of-Use (POU), off-grid power generation (as opposed to the current, centralized system, distributed to millions of POUs through the miles of poles and cables wiped out by the storms), such as solar, geothermal, etc.
(2) Surge-proof and flood-proof homes, by raising them on concrete decks, along with their car and boat garages, with provision of utilities through buried pipes and/or cables.
(3) Off-grid, autonomous, reinforced, cell-phone and internet towers.
(4) An island-wide, emergency fleet of drones and high-water vehicles.

<< Initially I would recommend that the President get off the golf course and stop tweeting insults to the Puerto Ricans and try get electricity restored and emergency supplies in. >>

Your Trump Denial Syndrome is rearing its ugly head again, breaking through the spurts of civility you have lately labored to produce. He's sent a lot of resources to PR and Tuesday will fly there in person. So, just leave him be.

MitchP85D | October 2, 2017

No Captain Planet, that is what hurricanes do. People like you attach meanings to weather events - an invention that only exists in between your ears.

SamO | October 2, 2017

Right . . . Libruls attach meaning to weather . . .

Like these Librul scientists ... Pat Robertson, Hal Lindsey, and Charles Colson.

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, some religious conservatives have speculated that the storm was sent by God as an omen or as a punishment for America's alleged sins.

https://www.mediamatters.org/research/2005/09/13/religious-conservatives...

Looks like that comes from Cheese's basket of deplorables.

SamO | October 2, 2017

Oh wait . . . here's scientist Kirk Cameron "Kirk Cameron says God sent hurricanes to teach us 'humility'

“This is a spectacular display of God’s immense power. When he puts his power on display, it’s never without reason. There’s a purpose. And we may not always understand what that purpose is, but we know it’s not random, and we know that weather is sent to cause us to respond to God in humility, awe, and repentance … Maybe share that with your kids when they ask why this is happening.”

But Cheese and MommyIssues are certain it has ZERO, NOTHING, NADA, ZIP, ZILCH and BUPKISS to do with running the stupidest experiment in the history of the planet and burning and releasing unlimited amounts of climate-changing hydrocarbons (and their byproducts) into the air, water and onto the land.

bwahahahahahhahahahahahahahahahhahah

I laugh because the alternative is having you institutionalized for early dementia.

The idea that you would cheerlead the destruction of a livable planet is something that reminds me of the mentality behind mass shootings.

MitchP85D | October 2, 2017

You are off the rails 60cc SamO. I can tell you are overjoyed with glee when you found out 2-3 inches of flood water came into my home! But then, you are a goofy, dumbass worthless piece of dog poop liberal democrat. Par for the course for you!

SamO | October 2, 2017

Oh poor idiot Mitch. Take up your attempt to change the subject with your idol, Kirk Carmeron.

I have family in Houston, so unlike a certain sociopath, I felt things like concern. I have family in Puerto Rico, so I still have feelings of fear that they've been abandoned by the Federal Government.

Please stop concern trolling for yourself, who has handouts left and right. Governent cheese eating hypocrites get what they get, regardless of my personal feelings for their lies.

Remnant | October 2, 2017

@SamO (October 2, 2017)

<< [Government] cheese eating hypocrites get what they get, regardless of my personal feelings for their lies. >>

So, your rudeness and malice are for naught? You're a generous SOB, aren't you?

Your mental handicaps are then a Special, aren't they?

MitchP85D | October 2, 2017

Have an interesting update to share. One of my neighbors who got flooded applied for FEMA funds WITHOUT flood insurance. She already got 10K sent to her. She noticed the construction workers in my house and wanted to get their contact information. Sheetrock was installed and they were painting today. My neighbor got 10K sent to her WITHOUT flood insurance while I am waiting on my claim to be processed.

So, 60cc SamO, Captain Planet, Hellasmarter Dude, who do you consider to be more of a welfare recipient? The one who got 10K of FEMA funds WITHOUT paying a flood insurance premium? Or, the one who has paid a flood insurance premium for 10 years like I have, and still waiting for the claim to be processed. Since you goofy, dumbass liberals are backwards and upside down in your thinking, you would think I an more of a welfare recipient!

Now, allow me to pose this question to you sanctimonious California liberals. If your homes get damaged by an earthquake, and you don't have earthquake insurance, will you apply for FEMA funds? I think I already know the answer to that question. And you will justify it by claiming you are entitled! But for anybody who gets flooded, f*ck 'em! I'm calling you A-hole California democrats out!

Brian H | October 3, 2017

True climatology:

Warming raises temps of high latitudes, winters, and nights. Contrasts between high and lower lithosphere are reduced; as are extremes of weather. The opposite for cooling.

RedShift | October 3, 2017

Welcome back Brian. I hope your health is better now? Your climate argument is as flawed and unscientific as ever, I see! :-)

MitchP85D | October 3, 2017

Correctomundo Brian H! But telling these sanctimonious California democrats that is like talking to a fencepost.

Welcome back, Where in the heck have you been? Did you order a Model S or 3?

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