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license all technology to GM & Ford

license all technology to GM & Ford

Accelerate the change, license all technology to GM & Ford. Make them an offer they can't refuse.

carlk | 19/01/2019

They are too proud and too scared of Tesla to make it a legitimate leader to do that. Although in a few years when it's clear (to them) that they have no other choices they might still want to do that. Tesla's mission is to make it clear to them. It's half way there.

GHammer | 19/01/2019

Didnt they already do that, like 5 years ago.
https://www.tesla.com/blog/all-our-patent-are-belong-you

mbirnie51 | 19/01/2019

Remember Bob Lutz's comments.....they are too proud. Rush Limbough also had a death knell for the Prius, he's another dimwit. I drove his Volt for 18 months until I convinced my wife to get a MS, then 3 years later a MX, and we still have a Prius V as our second car after giving our 2006 Prius to our daughter.
Tesla has already allowed use of patents so to keep on letting legacy OEMs use the newest ones would be counter productive unless they were serious about BEVs, but there is no way to know for sure. Now if GM and Ford want to pay-to-play...lets negotiate (I now detest that word "deal").

bp | 20/01/2019

Technology licensing is a short-term play - based on existing intellectual property, that will evolve and get replaced.

Another option would be for Tesla to focus more on the core EV technologies - batteries, charging, propulsion, and autonomous driving, and sell those components to other manufacturers, in addition to or as an alternative to manufacturing and selling their own EVs. There solar & power storage businesses would continue to complimentary, sharing battery and charging technologies.

This would allow the other manufacturers to focus on what they do best - building the vehicles themselves, selling them and servicing them.

But will any of the other major manufacturers be willing to do this? Probably not... At least not until they've spent a lot of $$$ trying to bring their own long range EVs to market, and find they cannot match Tesla's core technologies AND make a profit off EV sales.

oudsie | 20/01/2019

Rather than "sell" the components "license" the components.... it's just a matter of working out the right number...and yes licensing to GM , Ford etc.

oudsie | 20/01/2019

by the word "components" I mean to include software, technology, "big data" ...the whole kitchen sink....license for a price....

blue adept | 20/01/2019

I cannot see any upside to the suggestion of licensing technology to a competitor, especially ones that have been so adversely outspoken as GM and Ford, inasmuch as you'd essentially be handing them the means of sabotaging your operational systems.

The whole idea seems extraordinarily counterintuitive, like sticking your hand into the maw of a hungry lion that says it just wants to lick your fingers.

blue adept | 20/01/2019

Also, GM has already demonstrated that they're perfectly capable of producing a market viable/consumer desirable EV on more than one occasion (three in fact: the EV1, the Ampera-e, & the Bolt), they do not need what they already have.

Earl and Nagin ... | 21/01/2019

@blue adept,
They built an S-10 EV small pickup as well back in the 1990's. The White House security police used to use one for patrol.

TranzNDance | 21/01/2019

Does licensing entail payment? Are they even using the free patents?

David N | 21/01/2019

@TranzNDance
“Are they even using the free patents?”
Elon has offered Tesla Patents at no cost, and has offered Supercharger access (at a shared cost).
To my knowledge, no one has jumped at either.
As mentioned in earlier responses, “too proud”.
Sad.
Just imagine, if a big automaker would’ve jumped on the offers several years ago when they were first offered, they would have several Tesla based EV models in their showrooms today!
Shows where their priorities are (shareholders).

blue adept | 22/01/2019

@Earl and Nagin ...

Yeah, they also produced a electric RAV4-EV for a while, too, from '97 until '03, then again from '12 until '14.

Tesla even had a supply and services agreement with Toyota for the supply of a validated electric powertrain system, including a battery, charging system, inverter, motor, gearbox and associated software, again, for a while.

Sadly, none have been produced since.

Ross1 | 23/01/2019

Free patents had strings attached: it had to be reciprocal, ie GM, Ford Benz had to share back to Tesla, as I recall it

blue adept | 27/01/2019

@Ross1

Care to elaborate on your comment...?