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Does a new car's range improve over time?

Does a new car's range improve over time?

My new car now has 263 miles of mostly local driving. You would think that charging to 80% twice would have covered that, but it came with 70% charge and has had 2 partial charges in addition to the 2 charges to 80%. On a 2.2 mile drive on level ground with 3 traffic lights on the route and 50 degree outdoor temperature, the range dropped 9 miles.

Is there a break-in period for the battery, after which the range improves? Does it sound like I have a defective battery?

hokiegir1 | 16/01/2020

There is a break-in period for the tires, but short drives tend to use more capacity than longer ones. It's a heavy car that takes a lot to get it rolling -- and if you were using the heater at all at 50* outside, that will be a huge hit on a short drive (on a longer drive, it will average out to some degree).

Magic 8 Ball | 16/01/2020

Your battery is fine. There is an insignificant break in period for the car( mostly new tires) but the break in period for some new owners can take years. The car has advanced diagnostics and will tell you if something is wrong and if it needs service.

FISHEV | 16/01/2020

"On a 2.2 mile drive on level ground with 3 traffic lights on the route and 50 degree outdoor temperature, the range dropped 9 miles."

Range drops about 20% at 50 degrees.

Look at your Projected Range in the Energy graph (hit the little "card" icon on lower ribbon menu, a box with a up arrow in it. And then choose Energy from the second ribbon menu that shows up.)

That will you give a fairly accurate range estimate based on last 5, 15 and 30 miles.

Here's a graph how range varies over the seasons.

https://imgur.com/Ih0Yfkv

There's no break in period and range only goes down over time with Li-on batteries. Here's a battery degradation curve for my LR AWD from StatsApp for Tesla one of the apps that takes data from the car and shows you more than the car screens do.

https://imgur.com/KU3rruD

Joshan | 16/01/2020

once again Fish is dead wrong. I wont pick it all apart, but yes there is a break in period for new tires which affects range.

gmr6415 | 16/01/2020

In addition to the above the gearbox too. They are helical gears which take some time to form a wear pattern. It seemed to take our M3 a good 2000 to 2500 miles to go from around a 260Wh/mi average down to what would be expected for a LR RWD...234 +/- Wh/mi.

On short drives the gearbox has to warm up too which reduces the viscosity in the lube (I believe ATF) pretty substantially. Higher viscosity results in higher consumption. https://ibb.co/H49zTWx

Rikki-Tikki-Tavi | 16/01/2020

Disclaimer!
FishEV is local village troll and always wrong. Don't listen to his misinformation and disinformation.
Thank you

Rikki-Tikki-Tavi | 16/01/2020

gmr6415
Lol

jallred | 16/01/2020

Here's a graph how range varies over the seasons.

https://imgur.com/Ih0Yfkv

There's no break in period and range only goes down over time with Li-on batteries.

It can't vary over the seasons and only go down over time.

FISHEV | 16/01/2020

"yes there is a break in period for new tires which affects range."

OP is talking about his battery and range. My battery range degradation curve has been all down, as it should be, never say an uptick from tires breaking in so whatever effect new tires might have, it is so small it didn't register on the Tesla. When I changed to my Xice's, also saw no sudden loss of range from new tires.

FISHEV | 16/01/2020

"It can't vary over the seasons and only go down over time."

Battery degrades over time starting on Day 1...only goes down. Just a tech fact. Electric motors don't have a break in period. The batteries have no break in period.

www.batteryuniversity.com

Rikki-Tikki-Tavi | 16/01/2020

Maybe wait until first oil change

Magic 8 Ball | 16/01/2020

The "degradation" curve, often posted, has some data points that show more range vs data points prior. The curve attempts to show a trend but it is not accurate.

jallred | 16/01/2020

There's no break in period and range only goes down over time with Li-on batteries. - jack

Just today you told a story about your range increasing as the car heated up. Sounds like an instance of range going up over time.
And you showed a graph that showing the average range increasing as the calendar year moved forward.
Your graph proves your wrong.

Imagine if I drive on a really cold day, and my range drops by 30%. So I'm forever limited to 30% less range?

Range is more variable than degradation.

andy.connor.e | 16/01/2020

Degradation is dependent on how you drive the car and take care of it. Your experience will endure massive variance.

FISHEV | 16/01/2020

"The curve attempts to show a trend but it is not accurate."

If you go on TeslaFi.com or StatsApp for Tesla websites they can explain to you what their battery degradation curves are based upon.

I've yet to see anyone demonstrate that TeslaFi.com and StatsApp are wrong and fair to say, 95% of Tesla owners use it for just that stated purpose.

Might be good to review the original question vs. rehashing old stuff.

"Is there a break-in period for the battery, after which the range improves? Answer. No.

"Does it sound like I have a defective battery?" Answer. No.

OP should subscribe to TeslaFi.com and/or StatsApp for Tesla to get more info on his car.

hokiegir1 | 16/01/2020

Wow. I'm apparently a 5%-er. Battery tracking is not at all why I use TeslaFI. Road trip info, business travel data (mileage deduction), home kwh usage (related to overall cost of operation -- not battery capacity)....all reasons I use it.

And new tires absolutely do have a break-in period. Being on my 3rd set, each time, my first 500-1000 miles, I averaged 280 wh/m before settling back to my 45k mile average of 260 wh/m. The first 2 sets were the OEM 18's. Current set are Conti DW06s.

Magic 8 Ball | 16/01/2020

Not interested in an "explanation" the data speaks for itself. Clearly the battery shows more range in some data points that come later in time relative to prior data points. It is absolutely true that batteries do degrade over time but, as been pointed out many times, the data must be "normalized" to account for all other variables to be meaningful.

gmr6415 | 16/01/2020

@FISHEV, Electric motors don't have a break in period. The batteries have no break in period.

That's pure BS. Electric motors have bearings and bearings have a break in period. The surfaces are lapped during the manufacturing process. That's just like honing cylinder walls in an ICE. Lapping/honing produces very small scratches/protrusions in the metal surfaces, which allows them to wear into one another and set up a wear pattern. As they are wearing together it creates what is called "work hardening", i.e. the wear surfaces actually harden as they wear.

Additionally the model 3 has a 9:1 gearbox with helical gears. All helical gears go through a break in period. Any assembly that's made of metal to metal surfaces designed to run together under a load has factory lapped surfaces and has a break in period which reduces resistance over time.

jallred | 16/01/2020

I've yet to see anyone demonstrate that TeslaFi.com and StatsApp are wrong and fair to say, 95% of Tesla owners use it for just that stated purpose.

On TeslaFi, my battery degradation curve goes up and down. Degradation only goes down. Therefore TeslaFi is wrong. You can't plot data that goes up and down for a measurement that only goes down and say your data is correct.

And you made up the 95% thing.

teslamazing | 16/01/2020

Fishy is overdue for a psych referral.

FISHEV | 16/01/2020

" People developed elaborate theories on what was needed and why, and it was hard to sift the empirical evidence in trying to test or confirm the theories. Anecdotal evidence and confirmation bias definitely played at least some part. Today engineers can confidently advise users not to put too much stock in old theories of long, elaborate break-in regimens. Some users will not give credence to the engineers and will stick to their own ideas anyway; but their careful break-in beliefs are still harmless and serve roughly like a placebo in allowing them to assure themselves that they've maximized the equipment's working lifespan through their due diligence. Some manufacturers have removed break-in procedures because mechanically they are no longer useful. Other manufacturers list procedures to avoid customer arguments the manual was incomplete because the procedures were missing.[citation needed] The useful side effect of a "break-in at slower speeds" for vehicles is operator familiarization. An overly exuberant operator crashing the new vehicle hurts people, reputation and sales."

peeves85537 | 16/01/2020

When I went to check out the Model 3, I told the salesman "My Ford Fusion Energi loses about 1/3 of it's battery range if I use the AC or heater...Should I expect the same from the Tesla?" The lying MF said "oh no, using the climate control has almost no effect on the Model 3's range."

I should have known never to believe anything a salesman says. In fact, I shouldn't even have bothered to ask him.

Magic 8 Ball | 16/01/2020

From defective battery to lying salesman, what else ya got?

jallred | 16/01/2020

Great quote, too bad it is about driving a new car slow during its break in period. It has nothing to do with efficiency changes as the motor ages.

Joshan | 16/01/2020

so true M8B.... the goal posts just keep moving.

FISHEV | 16/01/2020

"Great quote, too bad it is about driving a new car slow during its break in period."

Actually its about new cars no longer needing a "break in period" as it was based on old tech.

This topic was about battery degradation which occurs with all Li-on batteries and starts from day one.

www.batteryuniversity.com

gmr6415 | 16/01/2020

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

The lapping or honing process also allows the surfaces to retain more lubricant; therefore, they are better lubricated and cooled during the break in process. As the surfaces develop a wear pattern and work harden the need for lubricant is lessened respectively.

"Gear lapping is the process of imparting a very fine finish and high degree of accuracy to gear teeth, by using a lapping tool and applying a fine-grained abrasive between a work material and a closely fitting surface, called a lapping plate. By running mating pairs together in a gear lapping machine and feeding a liquid abrasive compound under pressure into the gear pair, small amounts of metal are removed as the gears rotate, thus refining the tooth surface and achieving the desired contact pattern."

"Lapping typically improves the wear properties of gear teeth, and corrects the minute errors in involute profile, helix angle, tooth spacing and concentricity created in the forming, cutting or in the heat treatment of the gears. Therefore, gear lapping is most often applied to sets of hardened gears that must run silently in service. It is important to bear in mind that gear lapping is a mating process; two gears that have been matched by lapping should be operated as a set, and also replaced as a set, rather than singly."

"In order to make them run cooler and quieter, new gears are lapped at the factory. However, they are not lapped under the same pressures that driving creates. The loads generated while driving force any microscopic high spots on the gear teeth back into the surface of the metal. This is called “work hardening”. Work hardening is similar to forging in the way that it compresses the metal molecules into a very compact and hard formation. This can only be accomplished if the metal surfaces are lubricated and the gear temperature stays cool enough that the molecular structure does not change. If the temperature of the metal gets hot enough to change the molecular structure, it will soften the surface instead of hardening it. This may seen like a balancing act, but it all happens easily and passively as long as the oil keeps the gear cool while it is breaking in."

FISHEV | 16/01/2020

Is there anything in Tesla owners manual about the "break in period"?

When I picked mine up in May 2019, Tesla tech did not mention any break in period for Tesla.

Answer to OP's question is really "no break in period" for battery or car regarding effects on range.

bcmusik | 16/01/2020

If you bought your car in winter months then just go with the flow, don't think about it because when summer comes around you got a nice range improvement. Sort of like a bonus at work ...But in reality like everyone has said, ANY battery slowly degrades over time. Luckily Lithium Ion batteries degrade much slower than other forms of batteries at this point.

gmr6415 | 16/01/2020

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

gmr6415 | 16/01/2020

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

gmr6415 | 16/01/2020

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

gmr6415 | 16/01/2020

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

@FISHEV, The way manufacturers have gotten rid of "break in periods" is by improving on machining processes and developing better metal alloys for specific uses to the point that there are no special driving requirements needed during break-in in order to prevent damage unlike the cars of the 50s and 60s that came with break in instructions.

That doesn't mean there is ZERO break in where the resistance between surfaces changes and results in increased tolerances between surfaces over time which reduces the friction between the surfaces.

hokiegir1 | 16/01/2020

@peeves85537 - The AC has a minimal impact on range. Not none, but it's not overly significant. The heater does have an impact that can be up to 30-50% depending on conditions and settings.

FISHEV | 16/01/2020

Anything in Tesla owner's manual about break in period?

i couldn't find anything and nothing was mentioned when I purchased the car.

Bighorn | 16/01/2020

No and no.

howard | 16/01/2020

Bighorn, Did you just agree with FISHEV?

Bighorn | 16/01/2020

I have no idea.

Rikki-Tikki-Tavi | 16/01/2020

Howard, did you just lick Troll rear?

crmedved | 16/01/2020

The first step to owning a Tesla is understanding and accepting you likely won't get the rated range, unless you live in a all-year warm climate. If the weather is horrendous (<32 degrees, snowing, etc), I generally don't plan to use more than 50% of the range it displays after charging to ~85%. It doesn't usually get that bad, but good to be safe. Normal winter days for me is about a 30% range loss.

Some things to note:
- If cold, the first few miles of your trip will get bad mileage. Cold soaked batteries don't preform as well, you don't get as much regen, and most importantly, it takes a lot of energy to bring the cabin up to the set heat level.
- Speed will be your next critical factor. Ideal range is probably somewhere between 60-65 mph (not postive). Drag increases exponentially, so going 80 will use significantly more energy than 65. Going slower would expend a lot of energy keeping the cabin warm.
- Fast acceleration from the lights has a bit of impact too :)
- As mentioned, A/C has a minimal impact.

I noticed my car likes to blow air out the windshield defrost vents if it is cold AND the wipers engage... this can easily push me to like 500 Wh/mi.

gmr6415 | 17/01/2020

FISHEV (PHISHEV), "Anything in Tesla owner's manual about break in period?"

"i couldn't find anything and nothing was mentioned when I purchased the car."

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=5

"Tires are comprised of many layers of rubber, steel and fabric. Due to these different components, your new tires require a break-in period to ensure that they deliver their normal ride quality and maximum performance. As tires are cured, a release lubricant is applied to prevent them from sticking in their mold. Some of the lubricant stays on the surface of your tires, reducing traction until it is worn away. Five hundred miles of easy acceleration, cornering and braking will allow the mold release lubricant to wear off, allowing the other tire components to begin working together. It is also important to note that your old tires probably had very little tread depth remaining when you felt it was time to replace them..."

Hmmm! My Model 3 owners manual doesn't say anything about breaking in the tires, and I wasn't informed of that when I purchased my M3, so according to PHISHEV Tirerack must not know what they are talking about, as well as Continental a https://www.continentaltire.com/news/pair-shoes-tires-need-be-broken-too or most every other tire manufacturer out there.

The same goes for breaking in the gearbox:

https://www.revolutiongear.com/ring_and_pinion_break_procedure

Ring and Pinion Break in Procedure

When installing a new ring and pinion it is recommended to properly break in the new components. The proper break in procedure will extend the life of the components and help with the prevention of premature failure usually caused by extreme heat.
Although your new ring and pinion is “Lapped” from the factory for smooth quiet operation, they will still need to be broken in once they have been installed. A new ring and pinion will initially run hotter when new and can cause extensive damage if the temperature exceeds ideal operating conditions for an extended period of time. The suggested break in procedure is as follows...

https://www.sierragear.com/differential-repair-help-topics/ring-pinion-g...

All new ring & pinion gear sets must be properly broken in!!!
Improper gear break-in procedures may cause overloading and overheating of the ring and pinion gears as well as break down of the gear oil. Failure to properly break-in a new gear set can be identified by inspection, and may void the manufacturer’s warranty.

https://eastcoastgearsupply.com/ft-1479-new-gear-break-in-procedure.html

NEW GEAR BREAK-IN PROCEDURE
New gear sets MUST be broken in correctly to prevent damage. Not following proper break-in procedures will lead to overloading and overheating the ring and pinion as well as breaking down and ruining the gear oil. Not following proper break-in procedures can be determined during inspection and will void the warranty.

http://www.alloyusa.com/new-gear

All new ring & pinion sets require a brief break-in period in order to ensure long life and quiet operation. The following break-in procedure is recommended before applying a heavy load and/or constant usage.

Again, it didn't say anything in my M3 owners manual about that, so according to PHISHEV none of these companies that specialize in selling and/or manufacturing gear sets know what they are talking about.

Lastly, PHISHEV will remain in denial against all the facts as PHSHEV always does.

FISHEV | 17/01/2020

Thanks @gmr6415 for all the research to tell us there is no break in period for Teslas.

hokiegir1 | 17/01/2020

@Fish - Does a Tesla have tires?

beaver | 17/01/2020

Range should only improve in these conditions:
- better driving (i.e. slowing down, no hard braking)
- more moderate temperature (usually means warmer temps but if too hot means AC runs a lot then your range will drop, though that is counteracted by warmer batteries having more range).
- downhill (lower grade)
- better battery calibration
- lower resistance tires
- put the aero rims on
- lower weight (like kick your passengers out)
- new firmware (for example LR RWD got a range increase last year)
- remove roof rack or roll up the windows

Battery capacity and efficiency should only worsen with time as it ages.

jimglas | 17/01/2020

Remember: Fish is ALWAYS wrong
and bighorn is always right

jithesh | 17/01/2020

ya.. if you improve your driving habits over time!