Forums

People are not logical: you must win with appeal & convenience.

People are not logical: you must win with appeal & convenience.

I submit the reason Tesla has succeeded is that it appeals to our feelings; our passions. Tesla does not offer a purely-logical car like a Volt or Leaf which have very little passion but are workable for a subset of committed drivers who want an electric car.

The mass market will be attracted to the passion, but will be much less likely to make any special effort to change their driving paradigm.

Tesla not only must be more desirable, but ALSO must be easier than their old car. Every non-EV driver with whom I speak glazes over at the idea of installing a home charger. This is the #1 mental block.

But tell the same person "what if home charging installation is included automatically with purchase, everything taken care of -- and for long road trips you can use the worldwide Supercharger network."
The light comes on: "yeah, absolutely, I'd buy an EV then."

I submit that Tesla must include home-charging installation for Model 3 to be a sea-change. Edit: yes, even if simply installing a NEMA 14-50. /edit

Throw up your "Tesla couldn't find a way to distribute the average cost to include the higher install cost for apartments, etc" excuses, but it is THE way to absolutely take over the world with EVs. yes, it'll require a lot of work on Tesla's part.

Guess what: that's the REASON customers hesitate: they know it'll take work to get that charger (much more work in certain situations).

Most people are not logical like you. Easier + more appealing = success for Tesla.

Hi_Tech | 18/03/2016

Actually, now that I think about it... it could be a brilliant move.
Tesla could install very Tesla specific chargers, therefore any future needs for buying a electric vehicle would automatically lead to another Tesla!
That said, after driving a Tesla, you'll never go back to the another company's cars. Driving a Tesla just opens your eyes to how amazing a true car can be and how much the other companies rely on selling crappy products that are meant to break down.

JeffreyR | 18/03/2016

I can see how helping w/ home charging would be useful, but there are many cases where it's not an option, for example at an apartment complex. Or they may already have charging installed. So what do you do then?
Like SolarCity maybe Tesla could find the go-to installer in an area and give a referral.
It seems odd to me that installation of a connector/outlet would be such a stumbling block. It's just part of the "kit" you need. I think the hesitation is just typical "fear of change/unknown" that most people suffer from.
Does this issue deserve Tesla's attention? Yes, for sure. They could have a referral service and track success. They could have videos and other content about "preparing for your Tesla." But a lot of that already exists.

Swoodw | 18/03/2016

Tesla not only must be more desirable, but ALSO must be easier than their old car. Every non-EV driver with whom I speak glazes over at the idea of installing a home charger. This is the #1 mental block.

But tell the same person "what if home charging installation is included automatically with purchase, everything taken care of -- and for long road trips you can use the worldwide Supercharger network."
The light comes on: "yeah, absolutely, I'd buy an EV then."

I have Good News! Tesla come Std. with On board charger! All you need is a 120v but seriously , 240V 40Amp outlet within 20 feet of the parked car. 200 Mi range, 5hrs +_ Typ. not necessary to charge every night or day. 2017 SChargers will be everywhere.

Rocky_H | 18/03/2016

@JeffreyR +1 Quote: "It seems odd to me that installation of a connector/outlet would be such a stumbling block."

Yeah, I don't think it is. In the two years I've had the car and told many people about it, I've never heard that issue brought up as a problem. Home is never the issue with the people I've talked with. What I do get almost all the time is, "But what if you find yourself way out somewhere and run out of charge?" I then have to talk them through, "How do you suddenly just __find yourself__ way out somewhere? We don't teleport." You pack and plan at least a little bit if you are going out of town on a trip.

JeffreyR | 18/03/2016

@Rocky_H
Thanks. I think you make an excellent point. The between-the-lines message on that teleport concept is they have grown so used to driving their EV they don't think about it anymore.

I rented a gimped MS-40 (80% limited charge), while visiting LA in the heat of summer. My folks don't even have a dryer plug in the garage and I was fine. I asked about charging at my new condo before I bought it. They are already planning on installing some charging infrastructure. Then again I'm 2 minutes from Downtown San Jose on The Alameda.

Charging is everywhere and 40 kWh of battery can be plenty for around town (or trips to Malibu as the case may be).

georgehawley.fl.us | 18/03/2016

@Rocky: I agree. Most people are familiar with plugging electric appliances into outlets. My non-technical wife routinely plugs in a golf cart to a charger. I priced out a condo apartment installation of a NEMA 14-50. The bid was $1400. That would certainly deter some folks.

As far as the premise "people are not logical" is concerned. That's probably right in the majority of cases but I think that most people perceive themselves to be logical, even if they aren't. Logical arguments help people rationalize emotional decisions. E.g. "I can fit a 4x8 sheet of plywood in that minivan." True, but how many times will that come in handy?

"Driving a Tesla Model ≡ will save me $200/month in fuel and maintenance costs". True but did you see me leave the Bimmer in the dust at the last light? :-))

Red Sage ca us | 18/03/2016
PhillyGal | 19/03/2016

Even if they just include the HPWC "free" (markup the price by $500, assuming some economies of scale vs. the $750 price today) and leave people on the hook to install, it may achieve the same thing.

diegoPasadena | 20/03/2016

I like logicathinker's idea. Anything to remove that hurdle (which BTW was exactly the reason a young friend mentioned yesterday why he can't buy a Model 3).
There needs to be an opt-out clause worth, say, $950, for those, who already have an installation or want to do it themselves. Tesla's downside risk is not huge. There would have to be a set of parameters by which it can be determined ahead of time if installation is possible/impossible, and it would be up to the customer to get clearances from home owner associations or landlords. Then, according to that preliminary assessment, an installer would have to go out and make final assessment - perhaps $100 cost or less to Tesla. This would have to be a pre-sale contingency so the customer can still pass on the purchase, if installation turns out to be impossible.
But after that, it could all be done.

PaceyWhitter | 21/03/2016

Tesla could partner with local utilities. They would also want you to be buying electricity. They might be in to help subsidising outlet instillation.