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Older Drivers

Older Drivers

Tesla vehicles will be particularly important and valuable for older drivers. The enhanced auto-pilot and, later, self-driving will keep many older drivers on the road longer. As we get older, seeing around corners when making left turns becomes a problem as we lose our night vision. It would be particularly valuable if the Model 3 swiveling headlights could be available in the Model 3. Anyone else have ideas of how Tesla cars are - or could be - made better for older drivers?

AJPHL | 18/08/2017

Once FSD is approved and working, what else would they need to do? Your question implies older drivers want to drive FSD-capable vehicles 'manually' for some reason, which seems counterintuitive. I should hope they let the car do the driving, so they can relax.

Xerogas | 18/08/2017

Once full self-driving is allowed, everyone becomes a passenger. Older folks who have lost their driver's license will be able to move about the country, along with younger people, and anyone else who would be allowed to board a subway, a train, a bus, etc.

Musavviradam | 18/08/2017

I think the harder part is for the older drivers to trust the car itself to drive for them. I had a hard time to explain to my father about FSD and he is saying he will not get in the car at all if there are driving! So there's a mindset that may hold back some older driver.
It'll take some time to convince them, that is for sure.

Alvin27 | 18/08/2017

FSD will probably be approved for commercial vehicles on set routes fairly early.
Private vehicles should face a much tougher standard. Private vehicles will be exposed to a variety of road challenges. Think about it, each state and local government does roads and signs differently. Please, do not mention road construction zones. States will probably require the presence of a licensed driver in private vehicles for years to come.

Old folks will still be required to pass a driving test when their sight or cognition become suspect. The oldest seniors will not use FSD for fear of losing their driving skills and eventually the drivers license.

Tesla2018 | 18/08/2017

But will old Teslas drivers lose some of their memory and get confused and put the cars into ludicrous race launch mode instead of reverse and run through storefront windows?

Since turning 50 my eyesite has gotten worse and I cant read the tiny lcd display for mileage in direct sunlight. Hope they can make the screen adjustable for vision in the future so people wont need glasses to read a bunch of small icons when driving.

ReD eXiLe ms us | 18/08/2017

Fear is the mind killer.

Ross1 | 18/08/2017

With the touch screen central to the operation of any Tesla, it is not possible for anyone with Parkinsons or other tremor to operate the vehicle.
It is partic bad in RHD countries..Britain, Aus, NZ , Japan etc as most people are right handed but the screen is on the left.

I am one of those: the older I get the less Tesla can work for me. I have a severe familial intention tremor.

Voice control does not fully replace the manual requirements.

n2scuba | 18/08/2017

As an older driver (73) I was hoping for an automatic lift gate and cross-traffic warning. Now I'm just hoping the 3 will be easy to get in and out of.

tew ms us | 19/08/2017

Alvin27>> States will probably require the presence of a licensed driver in private vehicles for years to come.

Many states will have a compelling economic reason to require a licensed driver in any vehicle. Huge job losses otherwise.

http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/02/05/382664837/map-the-most-comm...

jas | 19/08/2017

n2scuba>> Now I'm just hoping the 3 will be easy to get in and out of.

I hope so too.

Artjamie | 19/08/2017

That will suck if the car can drive itself but I cannot pass the driver test so I'm stuck at home.

carlk | 19/08/2017

tew ms us That's an eyeopener but those jobs will eventually give to the economic force. With AI and automation technologies advancing like this we should really start to think what Elon and others proposed universal basic pay system now before it's too late.

dd.micsol | 19/08/2017

I stated this same thing nearly 2 yrs ago. I believe it will benefit the blind/hearing impaired/drug addicts and drunks.
I'd bet the cars computer is a better driver 100:1 in those situations. Probably higher.

bmz | 19/08/2017

I cannot understand these older driver's concerns. I am 76, and my driving skills are still superb. The only issue I have to be concerned about is pasengerscaredsh**less syndrome.

bmz | 19/08/2017

pasenger=passenger

bmz | 19/08/2017

While the censorship on this website is basically at a preschool level I had to spell "passengerscaredsh**less" with two letters deleted.

bmz | 19/08/2017

While=BTW

Carl Thompson | 19/08/2017

@bmz:
"I cannot understand these older driver's concerns. I am 76, and my driving skills are still superb."

You are lucky. I hope that when I'm 76 I'm doing as well as you! Nevertheless I do understand that there are others who are not so lucky.

Carl

bmz | 19/08/2017

Carl, I guess when I have to explain that something was intended to be funny--it really wasn't ;-)

georgehawley.fl.us | 19/08/2017

Hey, I'm 80 and my driving skills are still unimpaired.
(Don't ask my wife about this.)

Haggy | 19/08/2017

I don't think older drivers are necessarily scared off by technology. My parents are in their 80s, and it's not that my dad has issues driving, but my mom hasn't driven since 1977 although she has a license. It's not a matter of now but five, ten or even 20 years from now, there might be a need for my mother to drive. It just seems like a good thing to have if you don't know what might change in your life.

Alvin27 | 20/08/2017

@tew ms us - "Many states will have a compelling economic reason to require a licensed driver in any vehicle. Huge job losses otherwise."

You are right about that. The real fun will start when the unions jump into the fight. Take a look at how the Michigan legislature is protecting the auto dealerships for a preview.

phil | 20/08/2017

tew ms us | August 19, 2017Many states will have a compelling economic reason to require a licensed driver in any vehicle. Huge job losses otherwise.

The displaced drivers can be employed in the manufacture of buggy whips and 8-track tapes.

johnse | 20/08/2017

@ross1

You may be interested in research on tremors being done at Microsoft:
https://blogs.microsoft.com/transform/feature/emma-can-write-again-thank...

jefjes | 20/08/2017

According to my 91 year old dad, his driving skills are still superb but when I ride with him I'm one of those "passengerscaredsh**less" that bmz referred to. Maybe it's just a matter of self perception as we age. I hope I don't take out a few pedestrians or 7 Eleven store fronts before I notice my need for assistance.

Haggy | 21/08/2017

"You are right about that. The real fun will start when the unions jump into the fight."

You mean like when we still had elevator operators even for elevators with push buttons? Union employees kept their jobs but were not replaced upon retirement. In the mean time I could ask the elevator operator what floor something was on.

It will probably still mean a "driver" but it's possible that truck drivers will work remotely, and take over only when the truck is doing local driving.

dd.micsol | 21/08/2017

@jefjes-I thought you were referring to gta. Lol. Bonus points!

Ross1 | 21/08/2017

@johnse: thank you so much!

Shock | 21/08/2017

It's going to be a boon for old people. AARP should lobby hard if legislation gets hung up at some point and the tech looks ready to go.