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How to Go Cross Country - Your Advice, Summarized

How to Go Cross Country - Your Advice, Summarized

Pretty soon we'll get into the detailed planning stage for our Utah Parks trip.
But, as you all know, owning a Model S can give you wild ideas!
Everyday we stray off topic and let our minds rove all over the U.S.

A friend making a film on the Lewis and Clark expedition invited us to his cabin in Helena, Montana next summer. So we got the idea to go north and west (from Denver) and visit him. That's on top of our idea of going to Steve's birthplace in Upper Michigan. Note: this idea has morphed into the Great Lakes in a new Model 3 trip!

My parents and sister live in Northern Virginia, and so we started talking about shipping the T to Virginia and then spending months roving all around the East Coast, which we have only partially seen.

But, some of you, like @SamO, have actually driven the whole cross country route (and back).

My main concern about doing that would be driver fatigue (and all the foreign objects in the middle of high speed highway lanes).

Is it necessary or better to have multiple drivers to maintain alertness? If so, how many hours of driving per each, or per day total do you think is prudent? Break up the trip and not drive too many miles per day? Don't drive at night? Only drive at night?

What were the techniques that you used or learned in "going the distance"?

I see those red dots on the Supercharger map and they are like beacons. Egging me on.
I need help!

OK, here's the wisdom of long-distance drivers on our forum, condensed:

1) drive in the daytime (SamO)
2) 8 hours is ideal (SamO)
3) slow on climbs, coast/fast on downhills (SamO)
4) smell the roses along the way (Goehring9, SamO)
5) stop every 2-3 hours for 45 minutes (John Glenney)
6) remember: outside Cali, there's weather (John Glenney)
7) rest at night unless you have more than 2 drivers (SeattleSid)
8) avoid sugar/coffee (Pungoteague_Dave)
9) avoid forest rats at night/other animals (P_D)
10) stay alert by taking 20 minute naps (P_D)
11) nail in tire - inside patch, not plug (TeslaOwnerBlog)
12) 3.5" REI self-inflatable mattress for rest (TeslaOwnerBlog)
13) drink coffee!/eat tortilla chips (Bighorn)
14) drive at night/early a.m. around major cities (Bighorn)
15) use cruise control (centralvalley)
16) time SC so that you are not on road when bars close (Captain_Zap)
17) avoid being on road for sunrise going East and sunset going West (KevinR)
18) when off Supercharger grid, limit to 180-240 miles (CraigW)
19) find a hotel chain and use their reservation system (CraigW)
20) get $50 Tesla tire repair kit for piece of mind (CraigW)
21) bring tire plug kit (Tesla slime doesn't work on large punctures) (Bighorn)
22) avoid colliding with road debris by avoiding traveling in caravans, tailgating (TeslaOwnerBlog)
23) give bottle of wine to new charging friends (darrelw)
24) use range mode
25) preheat car, charge until you're ready to leave with a warm battery to enable regen (JenAlJill13)
26) call ahead and ask hotel to block charging unit for you so you don't get ICE'd (rodrussel).
27) make sure you can see daylight between dual tires on trucks if following (Captain_Zap)
28) avoid following heavily laden trucks (Captain_Zap)
29) cold weather, Supercharge with warm battery before turning in as speed will be higher (sperrysburg)
30) best to bring two drivers (Anthony J Parisio)
31) Drive defensively, leave plenty of room for defensive maneuvers, both on the road and at traffic lights. Always have an escape route (Newampster)
32) Walk the parking lot at SC's (Newampster)
33) Enjoy the people and the sites. They will build the memories from the trip (Newampster)
34) use WAZE (Search and Rescue)
35 trust Tesla Nav system's charging times for each Supercharger (Search and Rescue)
36 Drive so that you arrive at Supercharger with 2-8% state of charge (Search and Rescue)
37 Watch for motorcycles splitting lanes (CA)(AEdennis)
38 Note emergency numbers changing at state borders - NV is NHP and CA is 911 (AEdennis)
39 At overnight stays at hotels with Superchargers, charge in am just before leaving (AEdennis)
40 Bring coins for toll plazas that still take them (Garden State Parkway, NJ) (AEdennis)
41 Consider bringing spare tire on long trip (robert, AEdennis)
42 Chew gum when you feel fatigue coming on, better than caffeine (tim)
43 Research EZPass before travel to intended states (tes s, barrykmd}
44 Account for local driving range lost when planning onward route (bnc)
45 Make sure you have cell phone, charged, for emergencies (akikiki)
46 buy adapter plug kits for every possible situation (sklancha)

adding what we learned on West Coast/Canada trip:
- put heavy wine/water bottles up frunk to balance load (sbeggs)
- slightly deflate tire pressure to reduce noise, increase comfort (sbeggs) - note: decreased life of Primacies to 25,000 miles
- bring along parcel shelf-table and chairs and minor cooking gear (sbeggs)
- circumnavigate major cities on Sunday morning (sbeggs)
- plan!
- note to self - acquire one orange cone.

Excellent and helpful suggestions from you all, thank you!

Anthony J. Parisio | 30. marraskuu 2014

For many reasons, it is always better to have more than one driver. However if you rest often enough it is not they only way.

SamO | 30. marraskuu 2014

@sbeggs,

Sounds like an epic trip.

Coast to coast and back in nine days required driving through the night 4 times. I had a driver helping on the way east. He flew home and I had a different driver helping on the way back west.

If driving alone, I recommend limiting yourself to driving during daylight hours.

I realize this "seems" very limiting, but after a few days on the road, driver fatigue can creep up quickly.

Having to stop for 30 minutes every 2-3 hours is actually very helpful and cuts down dramatically on driver fatigue. I often took a catnap during a range charge.

In answer to your specifics:

1. Unless you are used to working the swing shift, do not drive through the night.

2. Is it necessary or better to have multiple drivers to maintain alertness? Better but not essential. I did 90% of the driving on my trip but sometimes you just need the help or to stop and rest.

3. If so, how many hours of driving per each, or per day total do you think is prudent? 12 hours MAX. 8 hours, ideal.

4. Break up the trip and not drive too many miles per day? You can have "iron butt" days AND lazy days. Sounds like you aren't in a race with time. Stop and smell the flowers.

5. Don't drive at night? Only drive at night? See above.

6. What were the techniques that you used or learned in "going the distance"? Slow down on the big climbs and allow yourself to drive as fast as you like on the downhills, and you'll extend your range.

There's no special sauce to having a great road trip. I didn't do any planning either. Just got in the car and drove.
You have, IMHO, the best road tripping car in the world. Free fuel, quiet, and fast.

Have a great trip and make sure you post here so we can read all about your adventures.

Bon voyage.

J.T. | 30. marraskuu 2014

@SamO Great advice for everyone. Thanks.

goehring9 | 30. marraskuu 2014

@sbeggs
once upon a time, when we were young, we did such trips straight through, non stop, with lots of coffee. My wife and I took turns driving / napping. Like so many things, that was fine at that point in our lives but now...

I'm with @SamO - enjoy the trip, remembering it's the journey Not the destination that is inspiring you to go. Those beacons of power are simply points along the way.

Definitely keep us posted and we will drive vicariously through you.

JohnGlenney | 30. marraskuu 2014

I agree with the comments above that a half hour stop every 2-3 hrs reduces fatigue. I have done NY to LA with help from my daughter and we could drive a bit longer each day. I drove cross country with my 2 big dogs and they refused to help with the driving so I had to stop earlier in the day. Audio books played over the infotainment system makes the time fly by and there is certainly a lot to see between stops. Remember, outside California you can run into weather that can slow you down. Enjoy the trips and happy supercharging!

SeattleSid | 30. marraskuu 2014

In college and med school I drove from the W coast to the E and back many times. If we had three, we drove round the clock; one driving, one sleeping in the back seat, one riding shotgun, rotating with every tank of gas. When there were only two of us we stopped at night.

I like driving enough that I could see making the trip alone, but I'd be taking breaks and hitting motels at night.

Pungoteague_Dave | 30. marraskuu 2014

Stopping often and avoiding sugar and caffeine for a couple weeks prior to and during the trip are key. I completed the 2011 Iron Butt Rally, which entailed riding a motorcycle over 11,000 miles in 11 days. The ride required being able to stay upright and alert while riding about 20 hours per day. To be an official finisher, we had to provide proof of visiting all 48 contiguous states in that 11 day period (generally gas station receipts), while making three mandatory timed stops and meeting other requirements, like proof of mandatory rest, and call-ins to the rally masters. The ride started in Seattle and the mandatory strops were Buffalo, Jacksonville, and Los Angeles, in that order. Points were awarded for also going to Alaska (three riders accomplished this), the four corners of the U.S. (Blaine, WA, Madawaksa, ME, Key West, and San Ysidro, CA), and for providing photographic proof of visiting state capital buildings with higher points for more difficult locations.

Long distance motorcycle rally riders learn and are taught a host of techniques for staying alert and riding safely. Avoiding animals at night is the biggest risk, with three out of 100 riders in the 2011 event going down (one fatally) due to forest rat strikes. Unlike many long distance truckers, any substance that affects alertness positively are avoided because they create attention cycles that are dangerous. That includes coffee. Some riders are extreme - using pee condoms and tubing to avoid stops. Most of us have auxiliary gas tanks that allow 500-600 miles between fueling stops.

I would not hesitate to drive cross country alone and have done it on bikes and in cars and trucks many times. It is a bit easier to stay alert on a motorcycle than in a comfortable car, but you can do it safely given careful planning and proper focus on techniques that test personal alertness. One of the things we learn in LD rallying is that a 20 minute nap is surprisingly effective to stave off lapses. We carry mats and curl up right next to the bike, or across the bike's seat in what is referred to as "The Iron Butt Motel." This is way easier in a Tesla.

TeslaOwnerBlog | 30. marraskuu 2014

I did it solo last spring there and back in 36 days. Did it leisurely. No real need for a second driver. Here's a place to start on my blog as a summary of the trip.

http://teslaowner.wordpress.com/2014/06/10/x-country-trip-statistics/

Bighorn | 30. marraskuu 2014

Having just returned from a primarily solo trip--wife hitched a ride home from CA, but didn't drive--I've done a cumulative 14K miles of solo cross country driving in the MS. I find it to be "totally awesome" with a different dynamic than driving an ICE. I can go round-the-clock when I get to rest at the SC breaks, especially if I do a range charge when I'm getting a bit tired. I tend to drive late into the night, and the thought of renting a room at 3am and trying to get up for breakfast and checkout doesn't appeal. Driving overnight is great for high speed stretches through the west or avoiding Chicago traffic amongst other things. I did get to test the Ti/Al battery shield this last trip for a big retread, but it gets dark before 5p anyway, so visibility is always going to be an issue in the winter. Any trip up to about 1600 miles I'll do without a formal stop. I can go 36 hours with the stop-and-rest approach. Being solo really facilitates following your nose, no negotiation, efficient travel. Coming back with my wife, we spent the night at two different hotels and had an all-you-can-eat buffet in Primm along with other restaurant stops. On my way to CA, no hotels and no sit-down meals, so it's a different approach.

I do drink coffee on my drives, but mostly to avoid the dreaded caffeine headache. Eating in the car, especially tortilla chips, can really help wake you up if you're starting to feel a little tired.

That said, there have been some on-going talks about going for a new cross-country record when the I-90 route opens and that would certainly entail two pilots.

Different strokes for different folks--some will love it and others not.

centralvalley | 30. marraskuu 2014

I did the same thing returning home from Moab to Fresno in June. At threescore-plus years of age, I was not fatigued on the 21-hour drive via Blanding, Flagstaff, Kingman, Barstow, Ft. Tejon and home. Those Supercharging stops combined with a little sustenance (no ethanol consumption) and 45 minute breaks from driving supercharged my battery too.

Maybe I was on adrenaline the last 6 hours; I don't know. I left Moab at 7:00 AM MDT and reached home a little after 3:00AM PDT.

I think cruise control was extremely helpful. I also think that keeping my speed a few MPH lower than the limit made driving less stressful. Since safety is of paramount importance, taking 9 1/2 hours to drive 500 miles including two SC stops enroute seems like a small price to pay.

Besides, you can always "get a room!" for a few hours' shut-eye if necessary.

Captain_Zap | 30. marraskuu 2014

How many of you were hard core road trippers before the Model S came into your life?

TeslaOwnerBlog | 30. marraskuu 2014

I've always been a road tripper but never drove more say than 10 hours a day. I have had serious wanderlust earlier, although that is waning. nothing to do with Tesla.

sbeggs | 30. marraskuu 2014

OK, here's the wisdom of long-distance drivers on our forum, condensed:

1) drive in the daytime (SamO)
2) 8 hours is ideal (SamO)
3) slow on climbs, coast/fast on downhills (SamO)
4) smell the roses along the way (Goehring9, SamO)
5) stop every 2-3 hours for 45 minutes (John Glenney)
6) remember: outside Cali, there's weather (John Glenney)
7) rest at night unless you have more than 2 drivers (SeattleSid)
8) avoid sugar/coffee (Pungoteague_Dave)
9) avoid forest rats at night/other animals (P_D)
10) stay alert by taking 20 minute naps (P_D)
11) nail in tire - inside patch, not plug (TeslaOwnerBlog)
12) 3.5" REI self-inflatable mattress for rest (TeslaOwnerBlog)
13) drink coffee!/eat tortilla chips (no problem) (Bighorn)
14) drive at night/early a.m. around major cities (Bighorn)
15) use cruise control (centralvalley)

16) put heavy wine/water bottles up frunk to balance load (sbeggs)
17) slightly deflate tire pressure to reduce noise, increase comfort (sbeggs)
18) bring along parcel shelf-table and chairs and minor cooking gear (sbeggs)
19) plan!
20) note to self - acquire one orange cone.

Excellent and helpful suggestions from you all, thank you!

Captain_Zap | 30. marraskuu 2014

Time your Supercharging so that you are not on the road when the bars close.

sbeggs | 30. marraskuu 2014

@Captain_Zap,
I am definitely adding that one!

KevinR.co.us | 30. marraskuu 2014

My adds:
(1) Daytime driving is less fatiguing
(13) Coffee consumption and bathroom breaks are synchronized with SCs
(4) Allow yourself plenty of time to "smell the roses" and get off the superslab -- Your journey should be as enjoyable as the destination.
(15) Use cruise control for long highway stretches

(+) Avoid being on the road for sunrise going East and sunset going West

goehring9 | 30. marraskuu 2014

@sbeggs can you tell we all love the idea?!

sbeggs | 30. marraskuu 2014

@goehring9,
You guys are egging us on!

I think I will put these suggestions into my presentation about our West Coast/Canada trip at January's San Diego Tesla Club meeting. To give Tesla owners the idea of how they can take their cars on a long drive.

How do you like your new car???

goehring9 | 30. marraskuu 2014

Ok there may be a tinge of egging going on ;)

I just celebrated my five month Tesla anniversary and over the weekend was going to a concert with friends... I volunteered to drive of course... and they asked me "are you still loving the Tesla?" I replied " I'm more than loving it, I'm still In Love". Truly, I find myself driving more thanI used to, enjoying it more, and the honeymoon is Not over yet.

Brian H | 30. marraskuu 2014

Fatigue? In a Tesla? Shirley, you jest!

CraigW | 30. marraskuu 2014

I drive the 400 mile trips to NoCal and Phoenix fairly frequently in a 60 with no problems.

My wife, our dog, and I took a 6wk vacation and drove 10,000mi across the U.S., down the East Coast to FLA, and returned through N.O., Houston, Albuquerque this last Spring-Summer. I drove most of the way. We kept our daily milage between 400-500mi/day most days of Supercharger travel and 180-240mi when there were no Superchargers.

The trip was so tiring we waited 3 weeks and set off on a 2wk, 4000mi trip from SoCal to Spokane, WA and Montana in August.

Don't worry about the car; it is a dream on long-distance travel. The Supercharger stops actually keep you from over-tiring yourself and result in safer driving habits.

Pretty much everyone is very helpful - especially Tesla Service Centers - and you will be glad you drove through the country instead of flying over it. Plan a day or two for unexpected side trips. Find a hotel chain and make reservations - we used La Quinta because they are pet friendly and you can earn free night stays on their frequent traveler program. You can cancel/change with 24hr notice if you decide on a side-trip.

Get the $50 Tesla tire repair kit for your piece of mind. It fits easily in the trunk boot area.

Plan on having more fun than you expected to. That is one reason we immediately planned a 2nd trip to visit family and friends in the Northwest.

sbeggs | 01. joulukuu 2014

Thanks, everybody, for your excellent suggestions. I am going to update the original post with the final list.

Bighorn | 01. joulukuu 2014

Actually, from my most recent trip, the slime did not work for a largish puncture. For $10, buy a plug kit that can be used repeatedly. Familiarize yourself with the process--had I been prepared with one, it would have saved me a flatbed and a Sunday morning waiting for an auto parts store to open. No tire stores were open to fix the tire and a new tire can take days to ship in.

Stan_Stein | 01. joulukuu 2014

Should I take a spare tire on a long distance trip?

Bighorn | 01. joulukuu 2014

@Stan
In the summer, I carried along a spare winter tire. I did not do the opposite this winter. Depends on how much packing space you need, as well. The newer D won't have the luxury of space in the frunk. Are you inclined to carry along a breaker bar, torque wrench and jack? Otherwise, you're dependent on a tow or roadside assistance. Unless you shred your tire, a plug is probably the best option. Compressor at a bare minimum. If you do shred it, you'll be waiting on a replacement tire if you're not carrying one.

sbeggs | 02. joulukuu 2014

Do you have a strategy for avoiding hitting huge objects in highway lanes?

On the West Coast/Canada trip, we switched lanes just in time to avoid a huge BBQ hood squarely sitting in lane 2 near Corning, CA. Saw various objects on the road during the trip, and ran over a hammer transiting LA (no damage).

Here in San Diego, on my way to Japanese class at dusk, I slammed into a large plastic bucket with our older car, no significant damage, but it made a horrible scraping sound before I could get to the shoulder and extract it from the undercarriage.

I have seen sofas in the lanes, tires sitting flat, bumpers and car parts fallen off, recently a 6 foot ladder, and yesterday, an upholstered recliner chair in lane 3 just before our exit off highway 805. Luckily I had moved all the way over to the right hand exit lane as I glanced left and saw it.

Anyone have any good suggestions for avoidance techniques?

goehring9 | 02. joulukuu 2014

No help on avoidance techniques I'm afraid- I ran over a stray Caldrons orange cone on the 405 the other day with no issues. But I'm pleased to see you taking Nihongo classes- nice!

TeslaOwnerBlog | 02. joulukuu 2014

An easy avoidance technique that works except in busy traffic in metropolitan areas...

don't tailgate
don't ride in packs

I've never understood why people like to ride in packs on the freeway. It almost like they want to have company with other drivers. I always try to get out of the packs when I'm in them. Either in front or back and have plenty of visibility.

darrelw | 02. joulukuu 2014

@sbeggs
@craigw - Don;t forget you will make new friends along the way and send them a bottle of wine when you get back home.

sbeggs | 02. joulukuu 2014

Adding above comments to OP summary. Thanks!

rodrussell | 02. joulukuu 2014

If planning to use a hotel charger overnight, call ahead and ask them to block it for you so you don't get ICE'd.

ChrisB.co.us | 02. joulukuu 2014

BrianH:

I am serious, and don't call me surely.

sbeggs | 04. joulukuu 2014

Our long-distance veterans weigh in (from another thread):

JenAlJill13 | DECEMBER 3, 2014

Listen to John Glenney, he should know, having done the first cross country trip using SCs in the middle of the winter. My wife and I had an easier time of it since we did our cross country trip in the summer. Though I worried about elevation differentials, we actually climbed to Independence Pass at 12100 ft, the S is very efficient at getting much of the lost range back if your start and end points are at about the same elevation. You do have a built in range bank and it's called "slow down" if you need a few extra mles to get you there. Next to speed, temp is probably the biggest range consumer. As others have mentioned, preheat the car and charge until you're ready to leave with a warm battery. That will avoid that big intial battery warming spike. You should have no problems with the 191 mile range...

J.T. | 04. joulukuu 2014

I ran over a stray Caldrons orange cone on the 405 Maybe Code Orange has gone west. :-)

@sbeggs I will be adding a link to this thread in the FAQ. Making a new subheading for travel.

Thanks for all your work on this.

Captain_Zap | 04. joulukuu 2014

I never travel behind trucks with precarious looking loads.

I agree with never travelling in a pack and maintaining visibility as far ahead of you as possible.

Here is a big one! Whenever there is a vehicle with dual tires in front of you, be certain that you can see daylight between the dual tires if you are going to stay in that position.

This is one of the most memorable events of my youth. A truck flung a huge boulder from between the rear dual tires at me. Lucky for me, the boulder glanced off the hood of the car before it came right for my head. I flinched immediately, but it wouldn't have been enough. I am so lucky it didn't come clear through the windshield. There was multiple fractures in the glass that were circular and 6 to 8 inches across. It was at night. To this day I will not follow dual wheeled vehicles at night unless I can get a good look at their tires. Be especially conscious of dump trucks and log trucks.

I also had a cement truck spill concrete on the highway right in front of me. But, I already was giving him lots of space and I could stop in time. I just got some spray on my paint from it. I tend to stay away from high pressure vessel trucks because they look like missiles ready to launch with the slightest mishap. I also avoid trucks carrying volatiles like gasoline. Those have spoiled the day for many people.

sbeggs | 04. joulukuu 2014

@J.T.,
Thank you so much! Fantastic idea to capture the collective wisdom of those intrepid Model S drivers who have "gone the distance" so that it can be easily found, given that we lack sticky threads on this forum. We all eventually visit the thread that you started for new and curious people. I should go back and see what is new. Never stop learning.

sbeggs | 07. joulukuu 2014

Updated latest contributions, thank you all.

sbeggs | 21. tammikuu 2015

@Pungoteague Dave,

Any pearls of wisdom now that the road warrior has made it from Portland OR to Portland ME and home again?

mjs | 06. maaliskuu 2015

I just returned from a solo round trip from CT to Santa Monica and back. The elapsed time was 8 ½ days.

I took the northern route going West, following the SuperCharger trail, and took the southern route going home. I made the trip during the coldest week of the year, commonly driving in 15 degree weather, with temperatures getting as low as -12 on places.

I drove/charged for 18 hour days, and checked into hotels near superchargers for the remaining 6 hours. I lost 6 pounds during the trip.

I learned a lot about charging and driving in extreme conditions, and had to shovel my way into 4 SuperChargers.

On the southern route home (a choice I came to regret), I faced extremely snowy conditions throughout Kansas and Missouri. I stopped at a campground in Jonesburg, MO, for a 14-50 charge, but that was my only stop outside of a SuperCharger.

Despite only stopping briefly to sleep and charge, I met dozens of nice Tesla owners, and numerous other people who were curious about the trip.

I mounted my route map on the back side windows, and numerous people waved, honked and gave thumbs up as I passed (or was passed!).

It was an awesome experience to pass through many different cultures and scenery, and made even better by a great car.

Newampster | 06. maaliskuu 2015

I am planning my third cross country trip beginning in May. I will add to some previously mentioned tips:

1. Avoid following loaded pickups, open trailers, contractor trucks and anything that can drop debris. If you see a car with a mattress on the roof and the driver with his arm out the window in the "I got it, Honey" position - get away.
2. Drive defensively, leave plenty of room for defensive maneuvers, both on the road and at traffic lights. Always have an escape route.
3. Walk the parking lot at SC's.
4. Enjoy the people and the sites. They will build the memories from the trip.

Stan_Stein | 23. huhtikuu 2015

I am planning a trip from San Diego to Boston in early June. I am planning on using Interstate 15 to Nevada eventually heading East on Interstate 70 rather that going the Northerly route that adds a lot more miles to the trip. Now that the St louis supercharger is available it looks like clear supercharging all the way to West Virginia charging. My route East of their is more fussy. Suggestions or comments would be appreciated

Brian H | 25. huhtikuu 2015

east of there

Stan_Stein | 25. huhtikuu 2015

sorry for the typo but really

Rocky_H | 25. huhtikuu 2015

@Stan, don't take it personally. That is just a thing that Brian_H does here. I notice people's grammar mistakes too, but found that most people get irritated at being corrected and don't appreciate it, so I don't do it.

sperrysburg | 25. huhtikuu 2015

Most of these are very good tips. I traveled across country twice and would add that if you are traveling during very cold weather (below 20 degrees) make sure to charge up at a supercharger before you stop and sleep. Since the battery will be warm from driving, the charging time will be significantly faster than if you wait the next day when its cold and the supercharger charges very slow to first warm the battery. It will add almost an additional hour to your charging time that you could be driving. I find it pleasant to be able to immediately drive to the next supercharger instead of waking up feeling anxious to start the journey and then having to wait to charge. Although it would be nice to have breakfast while waiting for the charge, I found that supercharger locations were not placed near restaurants that were open early for breakfast.

I would also add that it is a much better experience to over charge with additional miles than to try to save time by only adding an estimated rated range and then having to carefully watch the energy usage during the next 2.5 hours. I would much rather be driving fast and not worrying about energy usage. The worst times for me on the trip were when I had to conserve energy, drive slow, and watch most of the traffic pass me by.

skymaster | 26. huhtikuu 2015

"The worst times for me on the trip were when I had to conserve energy, drive slow, and watch most of the traffic pass me by."

Wow, this shows how different we can be!! To me, the "best" times for me on trips were when I had to conserve energy. (Like smoothing down the road at 50mph through Monument Valley on our way to the Grand Canyon)

Driving a Model S puts me in such a Zen mood, that I have no problem slowing down and enjoying the journey.

Grinnin'.VA | 26. huhtikuu 2015

@ Stan_Stein | April 23, 2015

I am planning a trip from San Diego to Boston in early June. ... heading East on Interstate 70 ... Now that the St louis supercharger is available it looks like clear supercharging all the way to West Virginia charging.

The gap between the St Louis and Kansas City SCs doesn't provide enough range margin for my comfort. I'm hoping they will have the Columbia MO SC up and running before I travel that route, which I hope to do this summer. I was able to find only one public charger at the Nissan dealer in Columbia MO. And it's available to the public only during their normal business hours. They can accommodate only one EV charging at a time. They expect us to call ahead to check on when we can charge there. To me this sounds a bit too iffy.

Innkeep | 26. huhtikuu 2015

Stan_Stein wrote
I am planning a trip from San Diego to Boston in early June. I am planning on using Interstate 15 to Nevada eventually heading East on Interstate 70 rather that going the Northerly route that adds a lot more miles to the trip. Now that the St louis supercharger is available it looks like clear supercharging all the way to West Virginia charging. My route East of their is more fussy. Suggestions or comments would be appreciated

You might consider heading north from Indianapolis through Angola, into Ontario, re-crossing border at Buffalo (only in permit stage, but lots of public J-plugs in Buffalo and Rochester) and follow I-90 east. You'd need your passport.

Bighorn | 26. huhtikuu 2015

@stan
Seasoned drivers would find Independence to St Charles, MO tenable but at slightly reduced speeds. If you overnight in Columbia, there's an HPWC at The Tiger Hotel. Plugshare also has an L2 listed, in addition to the Nissan dealership, which would entail a very leisurely meal at Grand Cru.

sbeggs | 26. huhtikuu 2015

Thread updated with some additional tips.

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