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Kwh?

Kwh?

Hi new Model 3 owner here.

I have the dual motor vehicle. I am trying to determine a "typical" cost for an overnight recharge from my tesla charger in the garage .

I do know what my typical KWh charge is on a monthly basis. Is there a formula used? Obviously one would have to estimate the typical percent of charge needed per night. I would typically drive 25-30 miles per day.

Thanks

Magic 8 Ball | 25. maaliskuu 2020

A month is about 30 days.

johnpickensavl | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Well I should have specified that I just received the vehicle, so can anyone tell me what their daily, weekly or monthly cost is to recharge to 90% perhaps from 65 %, every evening?

Magic 8 Ball | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Google: "How much does it cost to charge a model 3".

bjrosen | 25. maaliskuu 2020

The trip computer shows you the W/Mile, assume about 90% charging efficiency so divide by .9, and you'll have the number of watts you pull from the wall per mile. Multiply by your electric rate and you have your $/mile.

Bighorn | 25. maaliskuu 2020

It’s pretty easy to come up with cost per mile. Then multiply.

andy.connor.e | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Average Wh/mi x miles driven x electricity rate per kWh. You can check a previous utility bill for how much you are charged.

jallred | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Ballpark for op

.278 kWh/mi * 30 miles * .12 dollars/kWh = $1

andy.connor.e | 25. maaliskuu 2020

pretty crazy that, that is cheaper than pretty much any gasoline car. Even a hybrid.

detayls | 25. maaliskuu 2020

You should be aware that your Electricity supplier typically has different costs for electricity depending on what "plan" you are on.

My supplier is PG&E. My everyday use is on something called a Tiered Rata plan. I also have a separate meter that is for EV use only. It uses the EV-B rate plan. During peak hours it costs around 26 cents a Kilowatt hour. However, if I tell the Model 3 to charge after 11pm the cost is only 13 cents.

So you have to do at least 2 things:

1. Find out who your supplier is.
2. Find out what plans are available and what plan you are signed up for.
3. If you wish to separate your EV costs get a separate meter for your EV.
4. If you want your power for your EV to cost less, set your charging time to after 11pm or similar. This is done via the charge display in your Tesla.

Good luck.

andy.connor.e | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Some regions do not have a "plan". I pay for what i use the rate is the same. Check your utility bill.

bp | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Find your cost/kWh from your power bill, check your average Wh/mi metric from how you’re driving, then do the math.

For reference, our electricity here in WA state is some of the cheapest (and cleanest) in the nation, at ~$0.10/kWh, and with my driving, works out to about $0.03/mi.

johnpickensavl | 25. maaliskuu 2020

looks like .12 per KwH for me

Thanks ill look into the meter for EV good tip on the late nite charging

andy.connor.e | 25. maaliskuu 2020

The meter is only going to show you how much you are using.

rfpmoxie | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Surely, there are many ways to determine this. The other day my M3 turned 1 yr old with 8900 miles. On the card for "odometers" that you swipe to the right, if you scroll that card up to the 1st odometer (lifetime, I believe) it indicates how many kwh you have used. So, I multiplied ~1800 x 0.137 and divided that total by 12 and came up with $20.50 per month. The good news for me is that this month I was able to switch to a different electricity provider and will pay .0979 per kwh which takes me down to ~ $14.75 per month. I will keep a spreadsheet to check this stat as the odometer lifetime kwh will keep incrementing. This may be helpful as there's very little math.

rfpmoxie | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Surely, there are many ways to determine this. The other day my M3 turned 1 yr old with 8900 miles. On the card for "odometers" that you swipe to the right, if you scroll that card up to the 1st odometer (lifetime, I believe) it indicates how many kwh you have used. So, I multiplied ~1800 x 0.137 and divided that total by 12 and came up with $20.50 per month. The good news for me is that this month I was able to switch to a different electricity provider and will pay .0979 per kwh which takes me down to ~ $14.75 per month. I will keep a spreadsheet to check this stat as the odometer lifetime kwh will keep incrementing. This may be helpful as there's very little math.

Magic 8 Ball | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Wall to car battery is not 100% efficient.

wiscy67 | 25. maaliskuu 2020

I have home solar panels. My annual cost to home charge 13,500 miles and power my whole house for the year was $500. The point is everyone's situation will be different.

FISHEV | 25. maaliskuu 2020

"I do know what my typical KWh charge is on a monthly basis. Is there a formula used?"

Easiest is look at your total electric bill for one month. Find the kWh used and divide the bill total by the KWh.

It may be less if you night rates and other incentives but that will give a good ball park.

Magic 8 Ball | 25. maaliskuu 2020

"Easiest is look at your total electric bill for one month. Find the kWh used and divide the bill total by the KWh."

ROTFLMAO

FISHEV is weak in maths.

Frank99 | 25. maaliskuu 2020

>>> Wall to car battery is not 100% efficient.

Pretty close for 240V charging:
https://forums.tesla.com/forum/forums/120v240v-charging-efficiency-answers

RayNLA | 25. maaliskuu 2020

When people ask me “How much is cost to charge at home?” I tell them that It’s $25-$30 dollars. The truth is, I don’t care enough to find out. I just know that its a fraction of what I was spending to gas up a Toyota 4 Runner in SoCal.

fazman | 25. maaliskuu 2020

Cost is not that straight forward tho. cost at home vs supercharger is different. The cost for power + delivery charges + any above baseline costs can really get pricey too. Do you like running the HVAC all the time... that has a cost too. Its not as simple as the price at the pump and mpg.

my cost is zero at the supercharger but a lot of wasted time for charging and the range of 3 miles x 60 kwh usable battery on the 74 kwh pack.

jordanrichard | 26. maaliskuu 2020

Not too complicated. Just for easy round numbers, take your per kWh cost and add 10%. So using my rates, I pay $.20 per kWh + 10% = $.22. Each month I track via the Trips screen how many Kwh I used in a month, multiply that by $.22 to get my cost to “fuel” my car for the month.

I have a Model S 85, so a full charge would cost $18.70.

Now I have been tracking my data for 6 yrs now and my cost per mile works out to on avg to be $.05 per mile. Your Model 3’s are far more efficient than my car, so it should cost less.

andy.connor.e | 26. maaliskuu 2020

i added up each individual charge on my bill per kwh and got $0.1125/kWh

andy.connor.e | 26. maaliskuu 2020

stop making it sound complicated. its adding numbers.

Tronguy | 26. maaliskuu 2020

And for people like the SO and me with solar panels on the roof it's even sillier. In NJ they got this thing, "Net Metering". If the solar panels generate more energy than the house uses in a month, there's a running surplus that the electric company keeps track of. At the end of the year, if the surplus is still there, they pay -us- $0.02 per kW-hr; if it goes the other way in a given month (that is, usage over time ends up with the surplus getting drained out), then we pay about $0.12 per kW-hr to them. We've been running a surplus since 2008; before the Tesla, we'd have a surplus of around 2 MW-hr every year. Well, we've had the car now for about 18 months and discovered in this month's bill that, while we got close to bottoming out, we're still running a surplus; what with more daylight in the spring, the surplus is going to continue increasing until the settle-up date in May.
So - for driving around town, our incremental cost per mile of driving the Tesla around is $0.00 per mile.
Now, for long trips, we use the Superchargers. They charge about double the household rate, $0.24 per kW-hr, so the cost per mile, if one squints, is about the same as a really good hybrid. But: No oil changes. Still cheaper per mile.

andy.connor.e | 26. maaliskuu 2020

my utility company does the same thing only they keep track of annual usage. So its an annual powerwall that reimburses you for any overproduction.

n7142701886 | 26. maaliskuu 2020

Anaheim, CA, rate is 0.1975/kwh
I drives average 3500 ml/m, 260w/mile, pay about 179/month.
Tried to change to TOU rate but Anaheim Utilities refused. They don't allow TOU if people have solar.

kevin_rf | 27. maaliskuu 2020

No need to be perfectly exact. I always take my bill total and divide by the number of kWh to get my true rate. Assume you have a lead foot, so drive 3 miles for every kWh you use. Your kWh rate x miles you drive that month divided by 3. Close enough...

As a point of comparison, pre the Tasty Bat Virus lockdown, I was spending $50-$60 a month. I can get an exact figure because I have a separate meter for the car that the utility bills. I also have a TOU plan on the meter (Time Of Use, meaning it's cheaper to feed the car after midnight). It works out to 8-9 cents per kWh. So if you have a more normal plan and drive as much as me, it might be ~$120 a month.

FISHEV | 27. maaliskuu 2020

"No need to be perfectly exact. I always take my bill total and divide by the number of kWh to get my true rate."

Exactly. And really that is correct for home chargers as the EV charging is part of the overall cost and affects the bill, even lowering the overall house kWh cost in some cases. In trying to tease out EV charging from the entire bill it may actually hide some cost benefits of the EV.

For those of us on public charging, it's easy. $0,28 to $0,35 per kWh.

teslamazing | 27. maaliskuu 2020

For those of us on public charging, it's easy. $0,28 to $0,35 per kWh.

Speak for yourself. 50% of that for me

Bighorn | 27. maaliskuu 2020

I’ve seen examples of over $1/kWh on time based charging with some of the German EVs using ElectrifyAmerica. They charge 99 cents per minute and some charging happens slower that 60 kW.

Bighorn | 27. maaliskuu 2020

Than

FISHEV | 27. maaliskuu 2020

@Bighorn "I’ve seen examples of over $1/kWh on time based charging with some of the German EVs using ElectrifyAmerica"

No you haven't actually. You are referring to a video taken by a guy walking past a Porsche Taycan, the fastest charging EV on the planet, and taking a snapshot of the charging screen having no idea what the Porsche owner was doing.

For a real world, 10,000 mile trip in Porsche Taycan Turbo S, in the Winter, doing a circumnavigation of Canada and US using public charging. Porsche beat it's EPA range by 20%.

https://www.taycanforum.com/forum/threads/taking-one-lap-of-the-country-...

You really have to lay off the discredited Fox News. There is no Pandemic, it's all under control.

M-A-B-MCMLXXX | 27. maaliskuu 2020

Short circuit in the trolling processor.

FISHEV | 27. maaliskuu 2020

teslamazing | March 27, 2020 For those of us on public charging, it's easy. $0,28 to $0,35 per kWh.Speak for yourself. 50% of that for me"

Dang! Where are you getting $0.15kWh public charging?

I think Webasto told me over the phone I could pay a monthly fee for unlimited charging which, if I used it enough could be crazy low but they only have one charger that I could use at the shore but come June, I might try that.

Earl and Nagin ... | 27. maaliskuu 2020

What's surprising about $0.15/kWh at public chargers? I know of plenty of places around where it is $0/kWhr. Of course, there are often other EVs charging at them but, from time to time, you can find a free one.
I actually prefer paid public chargers since, when I actually need them, I really need them to be available. Since I do most of my charging at home or work, I have no problem paying a little for the convenience those few times.

FISHEV | 27. maaliskuu 2020

"What's surprising about $0.15/kWh at public chargers?"

I guess that you can't actually name any.

teslamazing | 27. maaliskuu 2020

What do you consider public charging? Is a Tesla SC public charging or no ?

FISHEV | 27. maaliskuu 2020

"Is a Tesla SC public charging or no ?"

Only Tesla so can't really call it public. But Tesla rates are $0.28kWh and $0.31kWh. That's about the range as EA averages $0.35 for me. Unlike you "I do most of my charging at home or work" I do ALL mine on public chargers so voice of experience.

M-A-B-MCMLXXX | 27. maaliskuu 2020

"$0,28 to $0,35 per kWh"

European-style decimal separators... Is someone over the pond logged in for this session?

Earl and Nagin ... | 27. maaliskuu 2020

If anyone wants to find free public charging, simply go to plugshare.com and filter on "Payment Required Location". It isn't 100% as it may show a few places with charging fees but its close.
Many are Volta or installed by the city, stores, or malls to attract visitors. Many have restricted time such as 90 minutes or 2 hours.

teslamazing | 27. maaliskuu 2020

Link: https://imgur.com/a/pB7WdJl

Just under $0.15

Like I said, speak for yourself son.

teslamazing | 27. maaliskuu 2020

“Unlike you "I do most of my charging at home or work" I do ALL mine on public chargers so voice of experience.”

Been supercharging since day 1, idiot.

TeslaTap.com | 27. maaliskuu 2020

I have a group of 16 free L2 chargers about 500 feet from my house at a school. Anyone can use them. If I'm willing to drive all of 2 blocks, there are another 16 L2 chargers for free at another school. All are solar powered from massive panels covering most of the parking area. No battery backup, but they generate so much power during the day, they are fine using the grid at night for the L2 connections.

Still I use solar myself, and don't pay anything when charging at home. Many other L2s around towns here are free as well, but not all.

lbowroom | 27. maaliskuu 2020

Fish has never shared a screenshot of a completed non Tesla charging session to demonstrate his net charge per kWh. He will quote the per minute rate all day though and extrapolate the theoretical best case.

M-A-B-MCMLXXX | 27. maaliskuu 2020
lbowroom | 27. maaliskuu 2020

3 of us didn’t...

FISHEV | 27. maaliskuu 2020

lbowroom | March 27, 2020 Fish has never shared a screenshot of a completed non Tesla charging session to demonstrate his net charge per kWh. He will quote the per minute rate all day though and extrapolate the theoretical best case.

Been posted a bunch of times, but always glad to post facts and figures again, the fanbois demise, the don't stand a chance.

https://imgur.com/cV1RMVw

M-A-B-MCMLXXX | 27. maaliskuu 2020

^ is that supposed to be the cost at which a seller breaks even?

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