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Automated Supercharger

Automated Supercharger

Well this is interesting....wonder what this will end up being.

"There’s another permit obtained last month that caught my eye. It made a reference to “Tesla automated parking Superchargers."

https://electrek.co/2017/04/21/tesla-model-3-production-line-automated-r...

KP in NPT | April 21, 2017
Iwantmy3 | April 21, 2017

Automated charging is essential to bring out the full potential of self-driving. What good is it to have a self diving car that can take itself to a supercharger but can't plug in?

The thermal management patent may be related to high power charging (>350Kw) since it is not required for current superchargers.

The two of these together would be a game changer.

bmalloy0 | April 21, 2017

Reminds me of a thought someone posted here maybe a month or so ago, where Tesla has Supercharger stations be a "free FSD" region, so that even people without it can benefit from a self-policing Supercharger queue and not have to worry about overage charges.

JuJo0 | April 21, 2017

I wonder if this is related to robotic snake leaked back in 2015. I know Elon doesn't like induction charging (too many losses for too little charge).

KP in NPT | April 21, 2017

Jujo if you look at the patent, it appears to be something totally new - something you would park over, then an "arm" (?) comes up out of the ground and connects to something on the bottom of the car.

Civicrick | April 21, 2017

"Filling up" is getting quicker and an antifreeze flush with every "tank". Sorry I'm late but I was watching someone on the news getting some important policies launched in a remarkably short time ; )

KP in NPT | April 21, 2017

Rolling back Dodd-Frank is what you consider "important policy?" And once again, it's grandstanding until there is ACTUAL policy change - like most so far, this does nothing for "the little guy."

"Like most of Trump's regulatory executive orders, Friday's presidential actions will have little effect by themselves. Instead, Trump will instruct regulators to reexamine existing rules with an eye to rescinding them."

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2017/04/21/trump-executive-...

But that has nothing to do with supercharging. Let's not turn every thread into a political debate, ok? :)

Red Sage ca us | April 21, 2017

It may just be that the contact plate moves upward to engage the charger, or battery pack, underneath the car. Thereby reducing induction losses present with a pure inductive system over the few inches that allows for.

akgolf | April 21, 2017

Looks interesting.

Civicrick | April 21, 2017

Aww. And you always have good replies too. Anyway, kudos on this patent link! Interesting stuff

JuJo0 | April 21, 2017

I can just imagine a malfunction in the automation system jamming its way into my car and just swirling everything in sight.

akgolf | April 21, 2017

Plugless is wasteful.

I can see GM getting all over this one. :).

Efontana | April 21, 2017

I was kind of surprised by the late date... maybe it is a continuation...

Anyway, glad the patent is pushed forward by someone who can actually use it.

The issues we had were dirty water/coolant and cooling towers, in that who wants dirty coolant forced through their battery? If you have two loops, like a nuclear reactor, the battery side loop can stay really clean.

Hope Tesla can make this happen. If you hold temperature at the chemical interface on the battery and don't charge past 80%, where ions feel like they are parking at the mall on black Friday, charging can be very fast.

Nice work. Hope prior art does not get in the way.

JayInJapan | April 21, 2017

Aren't estimated losses for wired charging around 10%? Wireless is going to be much more than that! What do the pros say?

Bighorn | April 21, 2017

Wired is about 15% inefficient. Wireless at a distance, much worse.

akgolf | April 21, 2017

@Jay.

The plugless website says for 7 level 1 and 12% for level 2.

akgolf | April 21, 2017

I should have said it's 7-12% less efficient than corded.

JayInJapan | April 21, 2017

@akgolf, I'd be very interested to see a user do a real test. Those numbers are very hard to believe. I have no problems plugging in. It's so easy.

@bh, ty. 15% is higher than I thought, but understandable considering the heat generated in the cable and connector.

JayInJapan | April 21, 2017

@akgolf, okay. So 22-27% is lost; even those numbers seem low. Ty.

akgolf | April 21, 2017

They do seem low.

JayInJapan | April 21, 2017

For the record, I have 0 interest in a wireless charging system. Scroll up up to read what I do.

lilbean | April 22, 2017

Wrong again, poor thing.

tstolz | April 22, 2017

I see wireless as wasteful as well ... way cheaper, and more reliable, if parking areas simply instal plugs. I wouldn't bother with charging stations .. just plugs.

JayInJapan | April 22, 2017

Yuuuuuge waste of power. Yuuuuuuuge

Carl Thompson | April 22, 2017

@JayInJapan:
"15% is higher than I thought, but understandable considering the heat generated in the cable and connector."

I get no heat at all in my cable or connector. I'd have it checked out by an electrician.

Carl

Bighorn | April 22, 2017

NB: Carl does not own a Tesla, hence he has no connector to observe.

JayInJapan | April 22, 2017

I'm guessing you're not using 40-80 A.

Carl Thompson | April 22, 2017

@Bighorn , @JayInJapan

Didn't it occur to you that owners of other EVs might have home charging equipment that charges at the same speed as Tesla home charging equipment?

Carl

Bighorn | April 22, 2017

According to BMW, their home charging capacity is up to 7.4kW depending on country. Tesla is capable of 19.2kW, so there's that. Or did that not occur to you?

SamO | April 22, 2017

Paid not to occur to him.

Carl Thompson | April 22, 2017

@Bighorn , @SamO
"According to BMW, their home charging capacity is up to 7.4kW depending on country. Tesla is capable of 19.2kW, so there's that. Or did that not occur to you?"

As I've said many times the i3 is not the only EV I've owned.

But if you follow the conversation we're not talking about what a Tesla with dual chargers is capable of. We're talking about JayInJapan saying his cable and connector get hot when he uses them which doesn't seem normal to me. Does JayInJapan have 19.2kW dual charger setup at home? I just suggested that if they're getting hot then maybe it's a good idea to call an electrician to make sure they're operating correctly.

Carl

Carl Thompson | April 22, 2017

Is this a normal thing for Tesla owners? Do your charging cable and connector get hot when you charge?

Bighorn | April 22, 2017

He didn't say they were getting hot. And you still haven't said what you've charged with that makes you an authority. I imagine your dumpster dive $3000 Coda didn't come with a factory charger. What was that third EV? Many, many people charge with HPWCs at 80A continuous. Are you surprised that generates some heat?

SamO | April 22, 2017

Charging my iPhone generates about the same heat as my Mobile Connector.

KP in NPT | April 22, 2017

My mobile connector doesn't get hot at all. That's all I use, besides superchargers.

Carl Thompson | April 22, 2017

@Bighorn:
"He didn't say they were getting hot."

He said 15% inefficiency in charging is understandable "considering the heat generated in the cable and connector."

"And you still haven't said what you've charged with that makes you an authority. I imagine your dumpster dive $3000 Coda didn't come with a factory charger."

All EVs, including my Coda, come with an AC charger built in of course. Otherwise how would you charge them at home? Just as the AC charger in Teslas is built in. But what we're talking about here are the cable and connector from the wall plug or EVSE that plugs into the car.

"Many, many people charge with HPWCs at 80A continuous. Are you surprised that generates some heat?" We're not talking about many people. We're talking about JayInJapan? If he has an 80A dual charger setup at home then fine. But if he's like most Tesla owners he doesn't and he's running a 40A-50A setup similar to mine.

You're really being silly about this needlessly, Bighorn.

Carl

akgolf | April 22, 2017

Plugless loses 7-12% more than corded and since corded loses 15%, Plugless is 73-78% efficient.

Badbot | April 22, 2017

facts fail to impress PDX

SamO | April 22, 2017

Trolls are paid not to care about facts.

Civicrick | April 22, 2017

I don't see that it would be so difficult to design a drive over charging plate that could flex around some and be aligned by something with the coolant connect like the in flight fueling of planes. I see the difficulty in the parts on the car and dirt

KP in NPT | April 22, 2017

Tesla patent info further explained.

Not induction - it is wired.

https://electrek.co/2017/04/22/tesla-patent-automate-charging/

akgolf | April 22, 2017

That makes sense, it's more efficient.

JayInJapan | April 22, 2017

Sorry, went to see Japan's Blue Impulse fly over my adopted city. Very cool. Not as precise as the Blue Angels, but impressive nontheless.

Carl the troll is being silly and reading all kinds of things into people's posts. I don't know why he leaves us to teach him about things he knows nothing about. He'll say something and wait to learn from us. As @bh pointed out, I said nothing about my charging gear getting hot (although it did 2 years ago and Tesla replaced my HPWC--very cool that they monitor these forums ;-) ). You have no idea what my setup is, unless you've done your homework. Silly troll

Carl Thompson | April 22, 2017

@JayInJapan

Well you did say 15% inefficiency in charging is understandable "considering the heat generated in the cable and connector."

So what hear were you talking about?

Carl

Carl Thompson | April 22, 2017

@JayInJapan

Well you did say 15% inefficiency in charging is understandable "considering the heat generated in the cable and connector."

So what heat were you talking about?

Carl

jordanrichard | April 25, 2017

Carl, "considering the heat generated" doesn't mean the cable gets too hot. The cable does in fact get a bit warm, but so does one's phone when charging.

As for the Plugless system, it makes no sense both in terms of common sense and financial sense to pay over $3,000 plus installation for a charging system that not only has higher losses, but then charges at a slower rate than a standard, 240v/40A outlet. It takes me literally 5 seconds to walk towards the back of my car, grab the wand off the hook and plug it in and then in the morning, do the reverse. I spend all of 5 minutes per MONTH, plugging/unplugging my car. $3,000 to save 5 minutes over the course of an entire month and get slower charging to boot, seriously..................

SamO | April 25, 2017

Tesla wants to own the ecosystem where it is profitable (city centers) and partner where it is rural.

No need for any shenanigans.

Tesla's charging expansion will be matched by service centers and showrooms. There is just too much demand for the solar panels, inverters, batteries, cars etc.

Waiting on Gigafactories 3,4 & 5 to be announced and break ground (if they haven't already).

Haggy | April 25, 2017

Nikola Tesla would be disappointed that it isn't all wireless charging.

Red Sage ca us | April 25, 2017

Haggy: Yes. But he was an alchemist, wizard, sorcerer, necromancer, genius type dude.

Frank99 | April 25, 2017

jordan -
I like, and am seriously considering purchasing, the plugless system. I figure that I'm always going to want a mobile connector in my trunk just because. Without Plugless, that means buying a $500-$600 Tesla cable, reducing the price difference. I figure installation costs are about the same as the 14-50 outlet.
With Plugless, I figure I'll get home,, tell the car to park itself, and walk in the house. No need to deal with cords dangling from the ceiling or hanging on the wall. I don't care how long it takes to charge - I've got 12 hours before I'll come back out in the morning. The lower efficiency is a concern -I figure it'll reduce my monthly fuel savings from $65 to $60, but it will increase my carbon footprint unnecessarily.

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