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"Consumers don't want electric cars.” - Mark Fields, Ford CEO

"Consumers don't want electric cars.” - Mark Fields, Ford CEO

Recent propaganda piece...
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/ceo-ford-just-perfectly-summarized-191600...

"Consumers don't want electric cars.”- Mark Fields, Ford CEO 2016
Really? I guess history does repeat itself.

"There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home." - Ken Olsen, CEO and Founder of Digital Equipment Corporation (the second largest computer company at the time) and, ironically, on Ford's Board of Directors in 1977. Digital Equipment Corporation (or DEC as it was affectionately known) is long since out of business. Ford will follow the same path unless they 'get it' in time.

nyc124b | December 4, 2016

Clueless!

Silver2K | December 4, 2016

unfortunately, I full believe over 95% of the consumers don't want electric, because of the price and charge time (misinformation).

Silver2K | December 4, 2016

if you don't push them into electric cars, they will not want it

carlk | December 4, 2016

@TSLAev

The largest computer company IBM too. It has never wanted PC to work because they were making too much money selling, or actually leasing, main frame computers. It was forced to put in some efforts since personal computer has becoming popular but the adage is still true when you don't want it to work it never will. The same thing happened over and over again in business including the current automobile industry. Tesla is the only company on the planet with the goal of making compelling EV so people will want to buy one.

Tropopause | December 4, 2016

I guess that's why the CEO of Ford joined the joint venture in Europe to install a network of high-speed super-duper chargers?!?

Maybe he meant there's no demand for electric in the USA? Just Europe? And why is that?

Tropopause | December 4, 2016

Has Mark Fields not heard of the Model 3 and the reservation list for it? I look forward to his excuse when Tesla is cranking out 1 million electric cars per year.

Tropopause | December 4, 2016

Just read the article about Toyota's CEO going to lead the new EV division. Hmm... CEO of Toyota leading the EV division. CEO of Ford say "no demand." I wonder who actually gets it?

Silver2K | December 4, 2016

Trop,

I think people have to be pushed into the pure electric cars. I can't get people to download windows 10 and it's free! The thought of electric cars strikes serious fear of learning how to drive again in most people's hearts

carlk | December 4, 2016

To be fair Ford did invest resources in the past years to develop lighter and more fuel efficient cars. But it's GM that is now making all the profit from selling large pickpup and SUV because of low gas price. It probably does not want to be burned one more time but to put your head in the sand and wish things will just go your way is not a solution either.

flight505 | December 4, 2016

I didn't want an EV either, until I floored the throttle on a P85D.

sosmerc | December 4, 2016

"The thought of electric cars strikes serious fear of learning how to drive again in most people's hearts"

I don't think it is fear of learning how to drive again...I think it is fear of whether or not you are going to make it from here to there!

georgehawley.fl.us | December 4, 2016

The key is for Tesla to stay in business, to keep growing at 50% or more per year and to continue to eat meaningfully into the sales of profitable models made by MB, Audi/VW, BMW, Toyota/Lexus, Nissan/Infiniti, and so on. Sooner later they wil get what is going on and begin to produce some competitive BEVs. GM has made a decent start with the Bolt, despite limited distribution.

Tesla alone can't supply enough cars to make a meaningful difference but Tesla plus all the big players are what it will take to make dent in the population of ICEVs. It is vital that Tesla keep going, though because there are no real competitors out there yet. Ford will begin to figure it out when the M≡ sales take off late next year.

McLary | December 4, 2016

The funny thing is that Fields didn't say that. What he said is:

“In 2008, there were 12 electrified vehicles offered in the U.S. market and it represented 2.3 percent of the industry,” Mark Fields, chief executive officer of Ford, said in an interview at Bloomberg’s Southfield, Michigan, office Friday. “Fast forward to 2016, there’s 55 models, and year to date it’s 2.8 percent.”

You could paraphrase that into "consumers don't want electric cars". This statement was made by the writer of the article. I'm sure Fields would agree with the sentiment, but he doesn't own the quote.

Some Ford facts for you:

"Ford has said it is investing $4.5 billion in electrified vehicles and will add 13 electric cars and hybrids to its lineup by 2020. Those models will represent 40 percent of Ford’s showroom, up from 13 percent now. Fields has said plug-in hybrids will be the fastest-growing type of electric vehicle.

But with fuel prices low, the automaker has had a hard time attracting buyers to its hybrid and plug-in hybrid models, including the C-Max, Fusion and Lincoln MKZ hybrids. U.S. sales of those models have fallen 6 percent this year, to 13,688 vehicles, according to researcher Autodata Corp."

sosmerc | December 4, 2016

"Ford will begin to figure it out when the M≡ sales take off late next year."

I sure hope you are right.....that sales will take off late next year ! Certainly feels to me like Tesla is approaching some kind of crossroad and we'll know pretty soon where the company is headed.

David N | December 4, 2016

"Consumers don't want electric cars.”- Mark Fields, Ford CEO 2016
Well, if you look back to see the kind of electric cars the big automakers were offering I've have to agree, I wouldn't want one either. So, I guess you could say what he said is true.
If all manufacturers produced 300 mile cars, with quick charging long distance ability, then I don't believe he would be saying what he said.
In a nutshell, automakers haven't made the type of electric cars that people want.

codyb12889 | December 5, 2016

I will be honest I do agree with him. I do not think consumers want electric cars.

What consumers do not want even more than that is dealing with pumping gas every few days to watching the fuel gauge slowly burn off their money until they do it all over, watching the news to see what war or monopoly group (*cough OPEC*) is or is not going to change how much it costs them to get to work, not being able to drive with the windows down because the air is unbreathable in traffic, and many of the other giant pains in the a** that come along with ICEs now that an alternative is being presented.

If you were to walk up to people and ask them if they want a car they plug in every night and wake up with 200 miles of range while never having to go to a gas station again the worst rate you would get is likely 6 out of 10 and thats would be in Texas.

Let his shareholders do the talking, he is really just trying to convince them that he is not screwing up with his lack of good BEV development.

McLary | December 5, 2016

I know Tesla purists will only accept pure BEVs, but the most sensible way to get people to transition is with PHEVs.

The Volt or BMW i3 can provide almost all of the miles driven on pure electric, while also providing zero range anxiety with an engine to charge the battery. The i3 in particular has a tiny gas engine for recharging. Contrary to opinions here, it is an all electric car, with a tiny generator on board.

codyb12889 | December 5, 2016

I agree that PHEVs are a great thing to offset range anxiety and that will be where quite a few people end up in the short term but I think BEVs will have eliminated the need for that with better energy density and faster charging in the next 3 - 5 years.

djharrington | December 5, 2016

What's saddest to me is that their Focus EV is a great little car. We bought one a week after delivery of our MS so we could use up our extra solar and be completely gas-free. If Ford tried, they could make an amazing long-range EV.

Silver2K | December 5, 2016

if your showroom is not 100% electric, then you're not going to sell well. If you go into a Tesla showroom, you're looking for an electric car, if you go anywhere else (40% electric showroom), you're looking for ICE and maybe an electric.

consumers want easy, electric is easy, but not an easy sale for the salesman.

Al1 | December 5, 2016

“In 2008, there were 12 electrified vehicles offered in the U.S. market and it represented 2.3 percent of the industry,” Mark Fields, chief executive officer of Ford, said in an interview at Bloomberg’s Southfield, Michigan, office Friday. “Fast forward to 2016, there’s 55 models, and year to date it’s 2.8 percent.”

I am not aware of 12 electrified vehicles offered in the US in 2008.

Ford CEO might as well say that major automakers still don't produce compelling electrified vehicles after receiving billions of public money given to them just to do that.

Earl and Nagin ... | December 5, 2016

@AI1,
I assume he was referring to gas-only hybrids, probably including GM's pathetic line of "mild" hybrids. IIRC, the only BEVs available in 2008 were the Tesla Roadster, Coda, and Fisker, other than a few glorified golf carts (Zap, Gem, etc).
I agree completely, that no ICE automaker offers anything other than half-fast compliance cars or sad attempts at EVs, even today.

carlk | December 5, 2016

@AI1

ICE car companies use the term "electrified" to describe anything with a storage battery and electric motor. That can be applied to PHEV and sometimes even just a simple EV. It was created for no other purpose than to confuse consumers.

carlk | December 5, 2016

That can be applied to PHEV and sometimes even just a simple EV=>hybrid.

jordanrichard | December 5, 2016

Sorry but unless I am mistaken, there are only 3 full electric vehicles available in all 50 states. The Leaf, MS and the MX. People in CA and even us here in New England (ZEV states) can easily get our perception skewed by what we see as available. There are some 40 non ZEV states that don't get the E-Golf, MB B-Class EV, etc.

Oh, I guess I should add the BMW i3, I assume it is available in non ZEV states.

TeslaTap.com | December 5, 2016

A clearer statement would have been "Consumers don't want crappy electric cars". To bad most of the EVs other than Tesla fall into that category.

Red Sage ca us | December 5, 2016

"Consumers don't want slow, fugly, short range, crappy electric cars that have a 100% pricing premium over the ICE variant they were cobbled together from!" -- Red Sage

David N | December 5, 2016

TeslaTap.com | December 5, 2016
A clearer statement would have been "Consumers don't want crappy electric cars".

Well said