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Forget Standard VS Air Supspension--Here comes Magneto Rheological Fluid Shock Absorber

Forget Standard VS Air Supspension--Here comes Magneto Rheological Fluid Shock Absorber

The clip explaining how to get a smooth ride with your shock absorbers at 4:15 is impressive.

Standard shock absorber Humvee was bouncing like a rabbit while Magneto Rheological Fluid Shock Absorber Humvee was much better.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBXQ-6uI8GY&feature=youtu.be&t=3m45s

I didn't know Since 2002, Magneto Rheological Fluid Shock Absorber has been on:

Audi TT
Audi R8
Buick Lucerne
Ferrari 599GTB
Holden HSV Commodore

Any one knows about it or experience it as true?

Any chance that Tesla can get it?

jordanrichard | January 31, 2014

This was developed by GM. They have it on a lot of their cars. Essentially there are magnetic particles in the oil in the shock. When needed, the computers system energizes the magnets which in effect thickens the oil which in turn effects the ride.

Dramsey | January 31, 2014

Yep, stodgy old GM, which, as we all know, is utterly unable to innovate in any significant way. We know this is true because they make ICE cars, and, well, because they make ICE cars.

Magneto-rheological shocks have been around for over a decade and GM sells them to a number of other car companies, including the likes of Ferrari. They are expensive and require a lot of electrical power, kind of like our cars.

MR fluid is interesting stuff. Search on YouTube for some cool demos.

DTsea | January 31, 2014

Regenerative shock absorbers development (from wikipedia). Apparently not invented by GM, Dramsey?

Electromagnetic

A patent for such a device was filed in 2005. This type of system uses a linear motor/generator consisting of a stack of permanent magnets and coils to generate electricity. This system was further developed at Tufts University and has been licensed to Electric Truck, LLC. Preliminary data suggests 20% to 70% of the energy normally lost in the suspension can be recaptured with this system.

Hydraulic

A system developed at MIT uses hydraulic pistons to force fluid through a turbine coupled to a generator. The system is controlled by active electronics which optimize damping, which the inventors claim also results in a smoother ride compared to a conventional suspension. They calculate that a large company like Walmart could save $13 million annually by converting their trucks.[3]

Another system has been developed by a team at New York State University.

Tâm | January 31, 2014

@DTsea

I think you misunderstood Dramsey because we are talking about a system that CONSUMES electricity like a hog (for our comfort)

and you are citing a system that GENERATES electricity.

RedShift | January 31, 2014

I don't think GM as a stodgy company, incidentally. Some of their cars are quite awesome, actually.

Not to hijack the thread, but take a look at the Bose active suspension too, while you are at it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSi6J-QK1lw

Hat mist consume energy like a hog too, I suspect, which is why it never took off. However, it's amusing to watchan LS 400 literally *leap* over an obstacle.

RedShift | January 31, 2014

* Hat mist = that must

Tâm | February 1, 2014

@RedShift

That's not a suspension system. It's a HORSE who can avoid, leap and jump over quite a big bump!!!!!

No more dodging a pot hole. Just have a look out on your side to warn you and have your horse, no I mean your car LEAP OVER it!

joer293 | February 1, 2014

Uncle Jessie would be proud, Bo and Luke can finally make a delivery without breaking a single bottle while being chased by Boss Hog.

Electromagnetic shocks have been around awhile, although I've only ever seen them aftermarket on Subaru STI's. Seems to make a big difference at the track, daily driving not so much. Most people focus in the positives, but That fluid is heavy and also has a heat degradation issue, short life in my opinion. Have they solved that yet? Or is that heat problem exclusive to having an ICE?

Regen shocks sound promising, for the Tesla Truck.

Webcrawler | February 1, 2014

Had this system o the last corvette. It works very well. All it does is vary stiffness and rebound time of the shocks.

Webcrawler | February 1, 2014

I should have noted that it can't raise or lower the car like air ride.....