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I hope laser headlamps is a option for the Model X

I hope laser headlamps is a option for the Model X

also if there gonna change anything, they need to redo the tail lights. Looks like a 2010 civic

georgehawley.fl.us | January 16, 2015

I hope you mean LED unless you want to drive around at night destroying retinas???

jjs | January 16, 2015

@george - Beat me too it.

sg021.pa.us | January 16, 2015

In theory, it does sound pretty cool:

http://blog.caranddriver.com/bmw-uses-frickin-lasers-for-high-beams-that...

It’s perhaps more accurate to call these headlights “laser-powered,” since the light they put out is significantly different from the pencil-eraser-sized dot you’re familiar with. In fact, deep within the headlight’s guts, the light from a monochromatic blue laser is converted into output that won’t burn your retinas to a crisp. “A special optical system directs the rays from the high-performance diodes onto a phosphor plate inside the light, which converts the beam into a very bright white light that is similar to natural daylight and pleasant to the eye,” BMW explains.

The whole process creates light that’s ten times more intense than today’s xenon, halogen, or LED headlights—all while consuming 30 percent less energy. And BMW has some nifty tricks to keep that laser-derived light from blinding oncoming drivers.

The Concept Iconic’s headlights cast light nearly 2000 feet ahead of the vehicle, more than twice the distance of conventional high-beam headlights, BMW claims. A camera-based Selective Beam system detects vehicles ahead of the car—either in the oncoming lane or those traveling in the same direction as the laser-lighted Bimmer—dimming the portion of the beam shining on the other vehicle. No more blinded drivers, and no more angry gesticulations from the traffic around you.

grant10k | January 16, 2015

Might be talking about the new BMW laser headlights. When you are travelling fast enough, they can selectively divert the light away from other drivers. They also selectively shine brighter on pedestrians and large woodland creatures.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WvK5WC4ns0

Brian H | January 17, 2015

Blinded walkers, deer, and dogs. A dazzling prospect.

grant10k | January 17, 2015

Pedestrians are at a standstill compared to a moving car, and are nearly invisible at night. It's far more important that they are seen by the driver.

PSA: Wear a jacket with reflective crap on it, or carry around a flashlight at night. Maybe a welding mask if these light become common.

georgehawley.fl.us | January 17, 2015

@tcrcnsx: I'm further behind the times than I thought. Apparently, BMW and Audi are playing with laser-derived headlights as @sg021 and @grant10k have suggested above. I must have been busy changing out incandescent bulbs for fluorescents when this stuff came out. Yet another thing I can learn about while waiting for my Tesla's.

georgehawley.fl.us | January 17, 2015

Here's a brief explanation of how the Audi version works:
Each headlight features a laser module that generates a cone of light that reaches twice as far as Audi’s LED headlight. Each module sports four laser diodes just 300 micrometers in diameter. They fire a blue laser beam with a wavelength of 450 nanometers into a phosphor converter, generating white light with a color temperature of 5,500 Kelvin–the perfect white light for nighttime illumination. The laser spot, as Audi calls it, supplements the standard LED high beam at speeds over 38 mph. A camera detects pedestrians and cars ahead and adjusts the beam so you don’t blind them.

Nice to know they have a camera that will keep the headlights from blinding people. I hope the camera works. Audi is including the headlights in the R8 LMX model that will sell for a mere $320K or so. :-))

grant10k | January 17, 2015

To clarify, the beam will avoid blinding other drivers, but it'll totally blind pedestrians. Hell, it'll target pedestrians, but it's more important that they are visible than keeping them from wincing.

Brian H | January 18, 2015

"Let them wear sunglasses," said Marie.

Remnant | January 19, 2015

@ georgehawley.fl.us (January 17, 2015)

<< four laser diodes .... fire a blue laser beam with a wavelength of 450 nanometers into a phosphor converter, generating white light with a color temperature of 5,500 Kelvin–the perfect white light .... >>

So, is it blue or white? Even if white, at that temperature it might still contain a lot of blue. Does Audi discuss the blue light issue?

When light hits a photoreceptor, the cell bleaches and becomes useless until it has recovered through a metabolic process called the “visual cycle.”

Absorption of blue light, however, has been shown to cause a reversal of the process in rodent models. The cell becomes unbleached and responsive again to light before it is ready.

This greatly increases the potential for oxidative damage, which leads to a buildup of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer (see Fig. 3). Drusen are then formed from excessive amounts of lipofuscin, hindering the RPE in its ability to provide nutrients to the photoreceptors, which then wither and die.

In addition, if the lipofuscin absorbs blue light in high quantities, it becomes phototoxic, which can lead to oxidative damage to the RPE and further cell death (apoptosis).

Read more:

http://lowvision.preventblindness.org/daily-living-2/artificial-lighting...

georgehawley.fl.us | January 19, 2015

@Remnant: You have again caught me outside my narrow area of expertise. What I reported was a quote from Audi. I forgot the quote signs. The blue laser light is aimed at something they call a "phosphor" converter that then emits pleasing white light for night time driving. 450 nm photons hitting atoms that absorb the energy and then give off a mix of photons that constitutes white light with a color temperature of 5500 degrees Kelvin.

Apparently this is the most common way of converting LED output to white light and, thus, is a mature application of the chemicals that comprise the common phosphors.

5500 degrees K is supposed to be what sunlight is like on a cloudy day, something we have evolved to tolerate. Doesn't sound particularly harmful, if my understanding is correct.

Maybe the Audi and BMW engineers are looking for volunteer pedestrians to test the safety of the laser lights. I would volunteer but I'm busy publishing incoherent posts on this forum while waiting for my Tesla cars.

vandacca | January 19, 2015

I heard from a reliable source that the Model-X betas on the roads right now do not have the "phosphor" convertors installed. That's why no one has "seen" it yet.

Remnant | January 19, 2015

@georgehawley.fl.us | January 19, 2015

<< The blue laser light is aimed at something they call a "phosphor" converter that then emits pleasing white light for night time driving. 450 nm photons hitting atoms that absorb the energy and then give off a mix of photons that constitutes white light with a color temperature of 5500 degrees Kelvin. >>

Unfortunately, for any given light source, the higher the temperature, the more spectrum shifts towards the short wavelength side, that is, towards blue. And blue is bad.

"Researchers Kirstin Denault and Michael Cantore – Ph.D. students specializing in Phosphor Material Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara – have recently created white light by directing a blue or ultra-violet (UV) laser at a phosphor target. In one experiment, the team excited red, green, and blue phosphors with a near-UV laser. In another, they excited a yellow phosphor with a blue laser. Both experiments produced white light, but with differing trade-offs of efficacy (lpW) and color rendering (CRI). The blue laser with yellow phosphor had much higher efficiency, but much lower CRI. The near-UV laser with RGB phosphors had high CRI and much lower efficacy.The trade-off between efficacy and CRI also exists when creating white light with LEDs."

"Denault has concerns about the safety of a blue laser + phosphor system. White light using a blue laser depends on a portion of blue light passing through the phosphor, with the resulting blue and yellow components combining to create white light. The blue laser light that passes through the phosphor is what concerns Denault. Other experts interviewed for this article didn’t share that safety concern."

Read more:

http://www.enlightenmentmag.com/trends/laser-vs-led

georgehawley.fl.us | January 20, 2015

Thanks @ Remnant: I feel like I just earned a degree in LD Phosphorology. Also, I will look away from Audis and BMWs at night.:-))

rn | January 24, 2015

5500K is blu-ish light. Some white LEDs are up to 6500K blu-ish white output.
2700K is 'warm light', good for home illumination.
2500K is orange street light (sodium type)

Tesla Model S is using 4200K, this is pretty neutral white. You won't want to use 4200K inside your home.

georgehawley.fl.us | January 24, 2015

As I noted in another thread, with its enormous battery the MS is a kind of long-lived flashlight that is air conditioned. This gives the idea to forget about an emergency generator and move into the car in the garage during a hurricane. Thanks @rn. As a result of your information, I won't drive it into the house.

vperl | January 25, 2015

At CES in Vegas these lights were mentioned.

The Federal Agency in charge is not in any time soon going to allow these lights.

If one bothers to actually look at the benefits of these lights the option should be available. But the FEDS say. No, no no.

Much like removing mirrors off MX. The removing mirrors and using cameras is on tract to happen. laser lights, no way, because of the FEDS.