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Space X

Space X

FYI

The first Space X launch will take place from Vanderburg this Sunday. Go Elon!

shop | September 26, 2013

If I'm not mistaken, this is the one where they plan to return the first stage back to earth via rocket propulsion. They plan to hover it over the ocean when it returns as a test. I wonder if there will be a live feed anywhere.

DJung | September 26, 2013

@shop SpaceX usually sets up a live stream for their launches so I would be surprised if they don't for this one

daoops | September 26, 2013

They won't unfortunately. They consider this launch as a beta test with both new rockets, engines and also a first test of reusable.
So ita almost not a real launch, they have payload but to a heavy discounted price due to the high risk.

So no tv this time :( still very exciting though! :)

daoops | September 26, 2013

They won't unfortunately. They consider this launch as a beta test with both new rockets, engines and also a first test of reusable.
So ita almost not a real launch, they have payload but to a heavy discounted price due to the high risk.

So no tv this time :( still very exciting though! :)

daoops | September 26, 2013

They won't unfortunately. They consider this launch as a beta test with both new rockets, engines and also a first test of reusable.
So ita almost not a real launch, they have payload but to a heavy discounted price due to the high risk.

So no tv this time :( still very exciting though! :)

Thomas N. | September 26, 2013

I see you feel strongly about that.

daoops | September 26, 2013

Ha ha sorry about that. Im on an ipad and it might post a new post when I hit "back.".
Ill be more careful :)

mrspaghetti | September 26, 2013

@Thomas N

Lol

mario.kadastik | September 27, 2013

So... we need someone in Vanderburg region to get a camera and set up a live feed for the launch ;)

Brian H | September 27, 2013

Yeah, includes a Canadian sat at 20% of full price.

dborn @nsw.au | September 27, 2013

Maybe after this Elon can get back to Tesla and concern himself with qa issues!!

Objective1 | September 27, 2013

Nasaspaceflight.com is a forum and news source that will doubtless blog the launch.

Andrzej1 | September 27, 2013

@OlaCarlander

According to the Canadian Space Agency, it will be broadcast live. See here, http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/satellites/cassiope.asp

BTW, I am pretty sure the folks over at MDA and the ePOP team think their payload is very real and hopefully the launch as well.

Objective1 | September 27, 2013

Also, it will be broadcast here:
http://new.livestream.com/spacex/F9-6

mario.kadastik | September 29, 2013

Seems it made a picture perfect ride, we'll have to wait for the press conference for the details on the first stage recovery. Only thing I heard during the launch was that the first stage engines did indeed fire for re-entry :)

Eryx | September 29, 2013

@OlaCarlander

Looks like it will be available to watch from multiple sources, one being...

http://www.spacex.com/

Brian H | September 29, 2013

The first stage recovery failed; the engines re-fired, but the stage spun and pulled the fuel to the outer walls, and starved the engine, which flamed out. Elon says they learned enough to expect success next time, maybe even a land touchdown. The next rocket to attempt it will be the resupply launch to ISS.

shop | September 29, 2013

Interesting. Whenever I write software, I feel like I'm tripping over every possible bug before I get out of testing. Doing what Elon is doing on rocket ships with so few problems (in the big scheme of things) is amazing.

What's your source to read more about it?

Hodas | September 30, 2013

Note that Space X declared clearly before the launch that they were not expecting to succeed on the first-stage recovery and were only hoping to obtain useful data on the re-fire. This was not a "failure" in the sense of failing to meet expectations.

Tiebreaker | September 30, 2013

Orbital Sciences Cygnus capsule berths at International Space Station

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/sep/29/orbital-sciences-cygnus-i...

Competition is good. However:
"Unlike the SpaceX Dragon that can return items to Earth, the Cygnus is designed to burn up upon descent. Once unloaded of its 1,300 pounds worth of food, clothes and other items, it will be filled with trash and cut loose toward the end of October. That's how the Russian, European and Japanese supply ships end up as well: self-destructing garbage cans."

shop | September 30, 2013

Once again, Elon does it right. While the other space companies did the minimum to get the contract, Elon goes the whole way, and by doing so, opens up new markets. We need to clone Elon :-)