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Emergency braking

Emergency braking

I constantly get Stop chymes when I drive and it’s snowy if there is residual snow falling from the roof on the sensors and the car sensors keeps detecting objects in the front and and the car is sporadically making Alerts to Stop from perceived objects. Any chance it could slam on the brakes because if thinks it’s a white snowman pedestrians crossing from top to bottom?

I keep anticipating it could happen anytime and keep checking in my rear view mirror to make sure I don’t get rear ended in the case it misjudged a sensor info. Now, I don’t only drive anticipating other drivers moves, I drive anticipating what a dysfunctional autopilot could do. Full Self Driving dysfunction paranoia ahead.

EVRider | 15 février 2020

Try cleaning the snow off your roof before driving, which you should do in any case.

gballant4570 | 15 février 2020

Also learn to operate the car settings.

teslamazing | 15 février 2020

@ EV and gball

+1

casun | 15 février 2020

run on sentences ahead.

WW_spb | 15 février 2020

Troll Flagged. Thank you

FactDoc | 15 février 2020

@EVRider
I always clean the snow of the roof, but when it keeps snowing, as I wrote, the RESIDUAL snow might fall down and block the sensors.
If you can’t read, don’t posts please

teslamazing | 15 février 2020

No. The answer is no.

teslamazing | 15 février 2020

Source: Ohioian and had my M3 since summer of 18’

FactDoc | 15 février 2020

How fucking useless these forums are.
They should just make one big thread saying, the useless members will tell you to go read the manual and learn how to operate the settings yourself while they keep jerking off while looking at themselves in the mirror.

teslamazing | 15 février 2020

Your question was answered. Calm the fuck down. My god

leo33 | 15 février 2020

Never once had anything like what OP describes happen to me while driving for 3 hours through snowstorm. I did have snow build up on sensors, and car tell me autosteer wasn't avail and to take over. After clearing the snow off, it worked again.

EVRider | 15 février 2020

@Maxxer: I always thought "residual" meant what remains after most of the stuff was removed, for example, the snow remaining on your roof when you didn't completely clean it off. My mistake.

FISHEV | 15 février 2020

"Never once had anything like what OP describes happen to me while driving for 3 hours through snowstorm."

Not surprising since what the OP describes is not driving through a snowstorm.

teslamazing | 15 février 2020

No shit. Driving in a snowstorm is worse so EVrider gave a good, worse case scenario example.

teslamazing | 15 février 2020

I meant Leo, sry.

Tronguy | 15 février 2020

So.. before the M3, most of the cars I've driven have been front wheel drive econoboxes and minivans. With the exception of my first car, a '71 VW Beetle. Which was an excellent snow car; compared to most of the RWD cars of the time, putting the weight over the driving wheels made a huge difference. For pretty much the same reason, most of the FWD econoboxes and the minivans were decent in snow.
But like all those who learn to drive in New England, one learns to "drift" around corners. It's definitely not Formula 1, stock car, or Indy, and, on snow, it's all (relatively) slow motion, but if one doesn't want to crawl slowly to work, one learns to drift.
VW Beetles, with all that weight in the rear, are oversteerers. Front wheel drive cars with that motor in the front are understeerers. The difference, in plain turns: When one loses it by going too fast around a corner, an oversteering car goes through the fence rear-end-first; an understeerer goes through front-end-first. Drifting in either car is certainly possible, but the motions one makes when doing so are different for the two types of cars.
Most of the under or over steering has to do with the weight distribution of the car. Most of the weight in front gives one an understeering car, where one has to crank the steering wheel harder and harder to stay in a turn; a VW, with the weight in the rear, tends to swing the rear end out as one goes around, meaning that one has to reduce the steering in a good, tight turn.
Teslas.. They're neutral, with about even weight on all four wheels. And, pretty much, when steering the car through the last two winters, one doesn't have to crank it harder or lesser to stay in a drift, plus or minus the anti-skid software.
The point is, though: If one has been used to an understeerer or oversteerer, the Tesla is simply going to be different then either of those two. And, since skids are the kind of thing thing that one doesn't want to learn how to handle when in traffic and extremis, the best one can do is wait for the first serious snowfall of the year, take the car into an empty parking lot, and practice skids. A lot. Until one doesn't have to think about how to handle the skid in that particular car. It's just like learning how to ride a bicycle.
This kind of training is difficult for southerners who live in areas where Snow Doesn't Fall. I remember living in Norfolk, VA, back in the 70's, where, during the winter, the westbound straight-as-an-arrow Virginia Beach Expressway would sometimes get iced over just outside of Norfolk. And that first turn into town would collect a bunch of muscle cars down the embankment on that turn; it just didn't occur to the locals with those wide slicks that there could be such a thing as Loss of Traction.
Moral: If you're going to drive any car around in snow, and you haven't driven that car in snow before, go practice, first.
The SO and I are driving a M3 LR RWD from 2018. So..