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Autopilot HW 2.0 power consumption

Autopilot HW 2.0 power consumption

As also Model 3 will have needed Autopilot HW 2.0 on bord (cameras, sensors and NVidia Drive XP2 computing platform), these electronics might consume a certain amount of battery power (appr. 0,3 kWh for XP2 only). Means, this would reduce driving range of the car for systems, you do not use that time.

Are there provisions to avoid waste of not needed energy - e.g. an intelligent ECO mode ?

dsvick | 20 mars 2017

No, at least not on the model S or X and likely not on the model 3. Even over the course of a several hour long drive I can't see those things reducing your range by any appreciable fraction of a percentage.

andy.connor.e | 20 mars 2017

It will drain your battery just like headlights, stereo system, navigation, wipers, seat heaters.....

It depends what you mean by significant. If we are talking more than 5% of your total battery over the course of a 100%-10% drain, Thats probably accurate. Maybe even close to 10% if you're a heavy A/C or heat user who loves loud music and doesnt want to drive. Running all that stuff at the same time will drain power.

Not much different from a gas car. Just you get to sit there watching the % battery go down instead of a rather inaccurate needle.

Carl Thompson | 20 mars 2017

rennerfra:
"these electronics might consume a certain amount of battery power (appr. 0,3 kWh for XP2 only)."

[Assuming you mean 0.3kW not kWh]

300 watts (0.3kW) sounds a bit high for the Autopilot electronics and cameras. I'd guess maybe 100 - 150 watts.

Considering at 70 MPH the car probably uses around 25,000 watts I don't think an extra 100 watts here or there is a big deal.

Carl

topher | 20 mars 2017

"these electronics might consume a certain amount of battery power (appr. 0,3 kWh for XP2 only).

0.3 kWh is an amount of energy, not an amount of power. Do you mean 300W? If so, and the car uses 300Wh/mile at 60mph, that means 1 part in 60 of the energy will go to those things (1.6%)

Thank you kindly

Carl Thompson | 20 mars 2017

topher:
" Do you mean 300W? If so, and the car uses 300Wh/mile at 60mph, that means 1 part in 60 of the energy will go to those things (1.6%)"

"300Wh/mile at 60mph"

That is an extremely bizarre and confusing way to write "18,000 watts." Why on earth are you using Wh/mi units in a comparison to watts? Where did you even get that figure? Just curious.

Carl

rennerfra | 21 mars 2017

Thanks for commenting my point - by the way: it's NVidia Drive PX2 (not XP2) + you can read in spec: up to 300W power consumption.

Hint: autopilot power consumption is just an example - there are lots of power consumers in EVs, which will reduce the driving range. Summed up, this might be markable...

Carl Thompson | 21 mars 2017

I don't think any of those little power consumers is a big deal when just moving the car at freeway speeds takes 20,000 watts or more. And the same is true for gas-powered cars. All of those things detract from the fuel economy of the car. The typical big one is the air conditioner. It reduces the efficiency of both gas-powered and electric cars by several percent. Electric cars also have the very big drain of resistive heating which can reduce efficiency up to about 30% or so. Gas-powered cars don't have that particular inefficiency as they recycle waste heat from the ICE.

Carl

Carl

Haggy | 24 mars 2017

This reminds me of a thread from a couple of years ago when a Model S owner showed his car to a neighbor, who questioned whether the radio could be used. The neighbor was convinced that it couldn't or it would drain the battery. Chances are his daddy told him when he was young that leaving the radio on without the engine running would drain the battery. He didn't seem to be able to grasp that the amount of energy needed to power a radio is tiny compared to the amount needed to get over 4000 lbs of car moving at speeds of 70 mph for hundreds of miles. The Model S 85 has 7104 cells, and one of them would have been adequate to run the radio.

A laptop computer typically uses six 18650 cells. That could easily power the computer for three hours, which is probably more than the amount of time that a car will go between superchargers on a long trip. For shorter trips and local driving, there will be so much remaining battery capacity that it won't factor in. That's roughly 0.0% of a Model S 85's battery pack that goes toward the computer. If you want to go out another decimal place, it might be 0.04%.

In other words, I wouldn't worry about it.