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Weight and battery

Weight and battery

According to fueleconomy.gov an extra 100 pounds in your vehicle could reduce your MPG by about 1%. I imagine a similar principle also holds true for electric vehicles such as a Tesla Model 3, but obviously not MPG (rather something like Joules per mile). My question then is: where can I find such datas? I have searched for similar datas for electric vehicles without any luck.

Earl and Nagin ... | 1 novembre 2017

@ostepop2222,
I, too, would like to see such data, however, I doubt it would be as believable for an EV as for an ICE vehicle. This is because the affect of additional mass affects EVs differently from ICE and there aren't a whole lot of EVs available to collect statistical data on.
ICE vehicles are affected by mass both for tire drag and for acceleration. Regenerative braking with EVs reduce the impact of mass on acceleration losses, unlike ICE, but t he benefit probably varies a lot with the power train design.
I'm sure Tesla has data for their designs but I wouldn't expect them to share it much.

james.nicklin | 1 novembre 2017

Also it's relative to the change that 100lb represents. Adding 100lb to a motorcycle will have vastly different (more) impact then adding 100lb to a Dump Truck.

Should_I | 1 novembre 2017

Mass effect is relatively small for steady state travel, but more of a factor in acceleration. IMO the above poster is too generous in implying mass helps regeneration, sure it does but it isn't going to be a big effect, can't get back what you have used.
Also consider ICE is blowing over 60% of available energy out the radiator and tailpipe. That alone makes it very hard to compare ICE to EV.

Are you looking to bill passengers for the extra Nicole worth of electricity they cost you due to their weight? What about the affect of additional body heat in the cabin on HVAC use?

georgehawley.fl.us | 1 novembre 2017

Here's the scoop: the greater percentage of weight that the batterry pack accounts for, the farther the car will go.

2017 S90D : curb weight 4647 pounds according to Edmonds.com. Rated range 303 miles (EPA)
2017 S100D: curb weight 4647.3 pounds according to Tesla website. Rated range 335.

Same car, same drag, same weight but the 100D has about 114 pounds more of 18650 battery cells (8,256 vs. 7,104). QED.

The best you can do is to put wheels on a streamlined battery pack but that's not too practical.