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Model S 60KW

Model S 60KW

Will I be able to travel from Sacramento, Ca to Tacoma, Wa. using superchargers in a model S 60 KW?

Firaz | 12 mai 2019

Probably, but it would be tight around the mountains between CA an OR states, I would double check the car built-in trip planner and other online ev trip planners. Also coming back to Sacramento if you are planning to do so would be even tougher.

AERODYNE | 12 mai 2019

I tried A Better Route Planner today, I like it as you can input multiple waypoints, and desired charge percentages

YouTuber Tesla Bjorn has a recent vid on this planner.

Consider a few destination chargers if possible.

AERODYNE | 12 mai 2019

Just tried ABR for you. 7 stops. Worst case 93 to 30 SOC near grants pass. 16 hrs total.

Of course, your battery degradation may differ.

rmnelson | 13 mai 2019

I drove roundtrip to Sacramento from the Willamette Valley of Oregon a couple of times in my S60 before it was upgraded to S75 without difficulty. Driving the speed limit is good idea for the S60 IMHO. Drag increases as the cube of the velocity; if you drive fast you may not be able to drive long enough to reach the next supercharger. Keep an eye on what the car is projecting your arrival SOC will be; if it is staying the same or increasing you can maybe think about speeding up a bit if you want. If SOC at destination is dropping you should seriously think about slowing down.

Aerodyne's suggestion of destination chargers is an excellent idea as well. I occasionally stop at the Plaza Inn in Ashland, OR which has 4 destination chargers in the basement parking area (which is marked "Compact Cars Only", and is a really tight squeeze in the S). Northbound after an overnight at Ashland and departing with 190 miles of range displayed, I've bypassed Grant's Pass in favor of proceeding nonstop to Springfield SC where I arrived showing 35 miles remaining. YMMV

Bighorn | 13 mai 2019

@rmnelson
Drag energy increases with the square of velocity. You’re thinking of power, which is cubed, but since your travel time is halved, energy expended is squared. Also be mindful that that’s just for the drag component—other contributors to energy draw are not velocity-dependent.

rmnelson | 13 mai 2019

@Bighorn
Another liberal arts grad founders on the sea of science. You are correct, and I stand corrected.

Bighorn | 13 mai 2019

Bonus points for not doubling down:)