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245/45/19 run flat tires

245/45/19 run flat tires

Thinking about replacing the 235/45/19 tires with a run flat that is a 245/45/19. Is this possible, and what are the pros and cons on affecting driving dynamics?

Scrannel | 8 février 2020

Lot of negative written about these tires. But, they came stock on my C6 as they did on the C7. The C8 in fact has all season run-flats. I like them, they had a predictable handling and break out. The C8 is getting great handling reviews. I plan to switch when I get the chance.

2015P90DI | 9 février 2020

We put them on my Dad's Model S. No issues. And for him, they actually came in handy---TWICE. He ended up with two "flats", or punctures and was able to safely drive straight to a tire repair shop and have it fixed in 10 minutes. Sure beat waiting for roadside service and whatever approach they would have taken.

I sure as hell wish I had them when I was in the middle of the Arizona desert and got a flat. 23 hours later, I finally made it home! WITHOUT THE CAR! Went back two weeks later to get the car.

rdavis | 9 février 2020

Isn’t the 245/45 going to be a taller tire with a larger diameter? Won’t that mess up your speedometer?

ejfrom | 11 février 2020

Potholes are a real pain with run flats. I went through 6 tires in 18 months as they were always rendered unrepairable. If you go with run flats consider Perelli which has (or had, haven't checked lately) a road hazard warranty where they will replace the tire in the first year and then pro-rate it after that. My wife had continentals on her old Merc and it cost around $600 every time she damaged one which was 2x per year. I will never get run flats again. Total scam IMHO.

nminars | 11 février 2020

Tesla has no information about how to handle a flat tire. They do not offer a compact spare! It could easily fit in my model 3 lower trunk area. Any have one? Anyone use the can of inflator\sealer aerosol
?

rdavis | 11 février 2020

nminars | February 11, 2020
Tesla has no information about how to handle a flat tire. They do not offer a compact spare! It could easily fit in my model 3 lower trunk area. Any have one? Anyone use the can of inflator\sealer aerosol
?
_____________________________

https://www.tesla.com/support/roadside-assistance

Tesla roadside assistance....

bucfan11 | 11 février 2020

I would think the main dis-advantage is weight. A R/F weighs more. The advantage is obvious. If you are even a little mechanical you can plug or patch your own tire. I can not recommend them enough.

Haggy | 11 février 2020

A spare adds weight. These days, it might not be the most likely thing to go wrong with a car, and you don't carry spare parts for other things. A spare, jack and everything else would add weight, but a big issue is that lug nut torque is129 lb. ft (175 Nm). For most owners, they wouldn't want to change the tire themselves and would rather have emergency road service do it. And a standard lug wrench might make it difficult for many people to get enough torque on the lug nuts.

For the price of a spare tire, jack, and everything else, you can pay for emergency roadside service as a rider on your car insurance, and have plenty of money to spare, for typical lengths of ownership.