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Trunk size

Trunk size

The combined trunk size (inc frunk) of the Model 3 is shown to be 14 cu ft, or 396 litres (according to data published by Teslarati). This is less than half of the Model S at 30 cu ft, and, as it's a sedan rather than a lift back, or hatch back, it seems small for a car that sits in size between an Audi A3 sedan and Audi A4 sedan. The A4 sedan has 17 cu ft of cargo space. The A3 sedan has 15 cu ft of trunk space.
I anticipated the Model 3 to equal or exceed the A3 sedan, so I'm disappointed by the lack of cargo space in the Model 3, which is more inaccessible when compared to the Model S as it has no hatch/lift back.
I understand the Model 3 is not a version 3 car, and is more basic than a Model S, but generating more usable cargo space is not a luxury item.
And with the small frunk space taken up by charging cables, only the rear trunk is usable and it will be less than 14 cu ft.
This makes it difficult for domestic vacations and a roof box will be inevitable, but that will cause drag and decrease range. I can only hope for clever internal packaging solutions, such as Honda's magic [rear] seats. But I doubt this will happen because it's a feature that the Model S does not have.
I am disappointed. Everything's else I have accepted, but cargo space is something that can't be found, or added after the purchase without reducing range and causing additional expense and inconvenience.
I've not cancelled my reservation, but I will be waiting for the car to arrive so I can have a thorough look before I make my mind up.

rbortins | 27 mai 2017

I have a 2014 Hyundai Sonata/Cargo volume of cargo space is 16.4 ft³ and I have more than enough room. Obviously, will need to see, but as long as I can fit in my Golf Club and an overnight bag in the trunk and a carry on in the front, that should be enough. No one is getting a 3 to regularly haul wood from Lowes or Home Depot.

eeb9 | 27 mai 2017

imdo wish they'd made this a hatchback, but ya can't have everything. So long as the back seats fold down, I'm good - though I know hat's not a solution for everyone

eeb9 | 27 mai 2017

imdo wish they'd made this a hatchback, but ya can't have everything. So long as the back seats fold down, I'm good - though I know hat's not a solution for everyone

Efontana | 27 mai 2017

Let's talk about where fossil fuels are used - daily commutes.

This car is designed to attack that daily commute first and foremost. And carry multiple passengers in comfort to help even more.

The model 3 sedan with a trunk and good safety rating support that mission, better than a hatchback does - for noise reasons in some location and passenger compartment temperature control reasons in others.
On weekends, the rear seat folds to support long items and one or two people.

This Tesla is about transporting people.

eeb9 | 27 mai 2017

True that. My daily commute is the place where the attributes you mention really shine.

That said, the reason behind any vehicle choice I make is what it can do on the weekend. In my case, that means long mountain drives, occasional camping, cross-country tours and suchlike. Fortunately, I will rarely, if ever, need to carry more than one passenger (possible carpooling excepted - though highly unlikely in my situation). So the rear seat space is, for me, just an extension of the trunk.

eeb9 | 27 mai 2017

True that. My daily commute is the place where the attributes you mention really shine.

That said, the reason behind any vehicle choice I make is what it can do on the weekend. In my case, that means long mountain drives, occasional camping, cross-country tours and suchlike. Fortunately, I will rarely, if ever, need to carry more than one passenger (possible carpooling excepted - though highly unlikely in my situation). So the rear seat space is, for me, just an extension of the trunk.

eeb9 | 27 mai 2017

Sorry for the double post - wish I knew what caused those...

FISHEV | 27 mai 2017

"..generating more usable cargo space is not a luxury item."

It is an issue and one that's been front and center since the first prototypes were out. Musk admitted the trunk was a problem with the small opening and promised to fix it but doesn't look like that happened.

Big changes on the new Volt and Civic was to put in high utility hatchbacks vs. the trunk. The new Ioniq uses the same design.

I think Musk and Tesla got caught in the initial design and then their plans to respond to demand froze that design in place. No time to fix the problem while gearing up for high production rates. It's just going to be a sedan with trunk and folding seats with limited utility on the trunk.

I'm sure it will get fixed down the road. Rear vision was one of the issues and using camera/mirrors fixes that. EV insider shows a Bolt loaded for campaign with the rear filled floor to ceiling and the driver having perfect rear vision for the "mirror".

KP in NPT | 27 mai 2017

The fix is the Model Y.

tstolz | 27 mai 2017

2017 Audi A4 truck is 13 cu feet ... vs Tesla 3 at 14 according to Car and Driver.

Iwantmy3 | 27 mai 2017

The model 3 is a mid sized sedan. It is not an SUV or a minivan. The model S is amazing for trunk space, but it is a different category of car with considerably larger outside dimensions. I am more interested in the amount of space for the passengers. Most of the driving I will be doing will not require a lot of cargo but will include carrying passengers. For the rare occasions where I need to carry both, I will need to use my SUV (as I do now). Once the Y comes out, I can replace that as well.

FISHEV | 27 mai 2017

@Iwantmy3 "The model 3 is a mid sized sedan. It is not an SUV or a minivan."

And even more need on a mid-size cars to use smart design to increase the utility of the vehicle. It's nice you have two cars but for people with one car and especially for people trying to stretch do buy a more expensive EV, the need is to maximize utility.

There is a no doubt a hatchback trunk like the TS (or Volt or Civic or Ioniq) greatly increases the utility of the vehicle. It is something to be fixed in future T3 designs and something they just couldn't fix for the first T3 release despite good intentions of admitting the design error and trying to fix it.

Sandy’s 3 | 27 mai 2017

Troll ^

brian | 27 mai 2017

I actually just logged on to post basically exactly what @graemecobb037 posted. And while I agree that the "3" is not a Home Depot / Lowe's lumber transport device... I'm also disappointed if these numbers are accurate. I don't care about transported giant stuff like skis or lumber, but I *do* care about being able to store all of my IT gear (routers, switches, access points, etc.) as well as a couple boxes of cable, tools, etc. And my 9 year old Elantra can do that. This thing has TWO compartments due to NO ENGINE... and still comes in less than what I already have in storage space. So, it *is* a concern if the 15 is accurate when totaling BOTH front and back trunks.

Efontana | 27 mai 2017

Eagles,

I don't think is was a design error. It is a design decision, and a good one at that.

If you do an integral of energy expended to get people to work and back, multiple occupancy comes out way ahead.

People like sedans better than hatchbacks for noise, 'briefcase in the trunk draft' reasons and maybe fashion reasons - people would rather treated as people than cargo.

If you do an integral of energy to get people to work and back, you will see that frontal area matters. As does coefficient of drag. The model 3 performs better on those two metrics than any vehicle that sells in volume. This is a determined by the physical shape of the outside of the vehicle.

If you do an integral of energy expended to get people to work and back, you will discover that a more efficient vehicle has to sell well to have a significant impact. Aerodynamic hatchbacks do not have a record of high sales volume.

Yes CUVs do sell well, but they are not efficient. They leave too wide a wake.

If you want to make an efficient vehicle that attracts buyers and riders while disturbing the air very little, it will look, almost deterministically, like a Tesla Model 3.

CraigW | 27 mai 2017

The Model S was such a superior car, from almost every POV, that people have come to accept that the Model 3 would be a junior version. It is a different kind of car and Efontana put it very well.

If you are going to pay less for your car, then you have to accept some compromises. If this isn't acceptable, then shop for a used Model S. You will not be sorry.

FISHEV | 27 mai 2017

@Efonta " I don't think is was a design error. It is a design decision, and a good one at that."

Design constraint is more the case. That Tesla has it on the S shows that if Tesla could have done it they would have done it. Tesla, like all car mfgs who build it in such as the Volt, Civic, Ioniq, advertises the utility of the hatchback.

Musk admitted as much and he hoped to change it and no doubt made an honest effort but the cost was likely prohibitive to redesign the car or to try and patch a fix.

Perhaps in future versions just a Chevy and Honda did on their new model Volt and Civic respectively.

FISHEV | 27 mai 2017

@brian "I don't care about transported giant stuff like skis or lumber."

Actually those you can fit in as I do now on my Subaru Legacy with a T3 like trunk lid. It's the bulkier items like my coolers that don't fit or like renting the pressure washer at Lower and not being able to fit it into the back.

KP in NPT | 27 mai 2017

Eagles is a troll.

EM never said he was going to make the Model 3 a hatchback. he said he was going to fix the trunk opening - which in this case meant enlarge it. but since the pigeon isn't buying a tesla all he can do is try to create an issue where there isn't one.

Efontana | 27 mai 2017

Hi Eagles, I think Elon did address truck size, but not in the way many had hoped (there is still room for a hinge at the front edge of the rear glass).

The height of the rear trunk aperture is larger. That is a long edge, so % wise the opening might be almost 10% bigger.

topher | 27 mai 2017

"No one is getting a 3 to regularly haul wood from Lowes or Home Depot."

Wanna Bet? Though I usually get my lumber from a local lumber yard, one of the things I need to check is how long and how many 1x4s it will fit.

Thank you kindly.

FISHEV | 27 mai 2017

@KP in NPT "Eagles is a troll. EM never said he was going to make the Model 3 a hatchback. he said he was going to fix the trunk opening - which in this case meant enlarge it. but since the pigeon isn't buying a tesla all he can do is try to create an issue where there isn't one."

Oh dear. You realize how foolish and irrational your post makes you look?

1. This "trunk" thread was started by @graemecobb037 stating his view on the trunk problem.
2. This is probably the 20th "trunk" thread on the Tesla forum with the same view and none started by me.
3. Musk has directly addressed the issue calling the trunk a "mistake" and a "problem" to be "fixed".
4. The issue of the small trunk opening was raised by many in the EV community, media to users.

KP in NPT | 27 mai 2017

Oh dear. You seem to not realize you have zero credibility on this forum.

tstolz | 27 mai 2017

2017 Audi A4 truck is 13 cu feet ... vs Tesla 3 at 14 according to Car and Driver.

ReD eXiLe ms us | 27 mai 2017

14 ft³ is probably fine for the trunk alone, though it is still slightly smaller than a Honda Civic (which has the largest trunk in its market segment), it beats all the cars in the 'Entry Level Luxury' market segment that are in the EPA size class of 'Compact' (Alfa Romeo Giulia and Infiniti Q50 are both 'Midsize'). No way does that actually include the volume of the frunk. The Hyundai Ioniq Electric has no frunk, is much shorter, and has a much larger cargo area, per the EPA.