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A 1000+ miles range Tesla?

A 1000+ miles range Tesla?

If the research in the Argonne Ill. lab pans out, a battery that has " “Five times the energy density at one fifth the cost.” is not too far in the future. See:
http://www.voanews.com/content/chicago-argonne-lab-developing-battery-of...
That would mean a 1250 miles range for a P85+!
At 1/5 the cost? So a Model S would be priced around 50,000? I hope Elon Musk is watching...after all he kind of started this ball rolling...

negarholger | 21 juli 2014

Is five times against Tesla or the industry standard?

Grinnin'.VA | 21 juli 2014

The video is more about ambitious goals for new battery technology than about any promising new battery that might even come close to fulfilling those goals.

I'm sure that Tesla would welcome any new battery that could fulfill the goals of this project.

Ron :)

Dramsey | 21 juli 2014

If Elon watched every breathless announcement of the miracle battery du jour, he wouldn't have time for anything else.

Let us know when it's in mass production.

Brian H | 22 juli 2014

Elon says TM fully evaluates every working prototype it has been offered. So far - zero examples.

Haeze | 23 juli 2014

People keep posting these "new battery technology for Tesla" posts, because a new technology is better than Lithium-Ion in one way or another. Unfortunately, to replace Lithium-Ion, the new technology would need to beat Lithium-Ion in EVERY way.

1) Energy Density (The amount of electricity stored in the battery)
2) Power Density (The amount of electricity you can draw from the battery all at once)
3) Recharge Time (In MOST cases, a battery with good Power Density will also be able to recharge quickly, but not always)
4) Safety (It can not be dangerous to keep in a moving vehicle, and must be very resistant to catching fire in an accident)
5) Reliability (Able to provide a consistent, predictable charge and discharge rate, and offer longevity comparable to Lithium-Ion so you do not need to replace the battery every year or so)
6) Price (If it is more expensive than Lithium-Ion to manufacture, good luck.)
7) Availability (It can't be made of rare materials)
8) Clean (It also can not be prohibitively polluting to produce)

Grinnin'.VA | 23 juli 2014

@Haeze | JULY 23, 2014:

"People keep posting these "new battery technology for Tesla" posts, because a new technology is better than Lithium-Ion in one way or another. Unfortunately, to replace Lithium-Ion, the new technology would need to beat Lithium-Ion in EVERY way."

AMEN

Ron :)

Timo | 23 juli 2014

I like these posts as long as they don't expect Tesla to get it immediately. It is nice to read about breakthroughs on battery development. People write here about hyperloop and SpaceX news too, so battery innovations fall nicely in general forum category.

Nexxus | 24 juli 2014

In an interview yesterday (7-23-2014) Elon stated they already have the technology to create a 500 mile-per-charge vehicle, but that it would be too expensive.

If they bring the battery cost down with the giga-factory, maybe the newer Model S's in 2017 and later could have this kind of range and the Model III can have 200 mile+ and sell for $35K base price.

If this comes about they'll sell everything they can make and still be production constrained. They might have to open another factory or two to keep up.

Boukman | 26 juli 2014

@Haeze...I do not think to replace the Li battery that a new kind would have to beat it in EVERY way. I my humble opinion( I am not a battery/electrical engineer/expert) you only need to beat it in a few categories ( from the list) and be even with others. Most people would agree that the main problem with EVs is Range. So if you have a (new) battery with a higher Energy density and Equal Power density than that of Li batteries at the same or slightly higher price, don't you think people would be interested? Of course you never want to reduce Safety, Reliability... but I could see people willing to compromise with a bit more charging time for a doubling range capacity...

1) Energy Density (The amount of electricity stored in the battery) : Better
2) Power Density (The amount of electricity you can draw from the battery all at once): Equal
3) Recharge Time (In MOST cases, a battery with good Power Density will also be able to recharge quickly, but not always) : Equal or slightly more (Worse)
4) Safety (It can not be dangerous to keep in a moving vehicle, and must be very resistant to catching fire in an accident) : Same (or Better)
5) Reliability (Able to provide a consistent, predictable charge and discharge rate, and offer longevity comparable to Lithium-Ion so you do not need to replace the battery every year or so):
Same (or Better)
6) Price (If it is more expensive than Lithium-Ion to manufacture, good luck.) Same or slightly Worse
7) Availability (It can't be made of rare materials): Same (or Better)
8) Clean (It also can not be prohibitively polluting to produce): Same( or Better)

Might not be fair to keep many of your conditions the same but I think it is a given that the research going on right now is taking all these factors as prerequisites in order to displace Li batteries...then again I could be wrong...

Bubba2000 | 26 juli 2014

The current batteries are fine for now. Tesla needs to optimize the design of Model S,X to reduce the weight and drag. The Model S at 4647 lbs is to heavy even with the 1200 lbs battery pack. Use of stronger alloys of Al, Steel, improved structural design, use of honeycombed structures, etc could reduce weight by 500--1,000 lbs. even the Al castings are thick and heavy. May be alloyed steel may be lighter than Al. Tesla with the help of SpaceX is quite capable of doing this.

In the mean time, it makes sense to deploy 500 SC sites and cover the US/Canada, China and EU. Plus HPWCs. Right now a S85 costs about $80k moderately equipped with tech package, leather, dual chargers,etc. price needs to drop to $60k for hi volume adoption.

Brian H | 27 juli 2014

Bubba;
I don't think TM is going to try for "hi volume" with the MS-MX. To push the price down that far would mean too much compromise and a slash in gross margin.